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1.
Violence Against Women ; : 10778012221150275, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2195107

ABSTRACT

Women have experienced increased rates of intimate partner violence (IPV) since the onset of the COVID-19 global pandemic, and at the same time requirements for physical distancing and/or remote delivery of services have created challenges in accessing services. We synthesized research evidence from 4 systematic reviews and 20 individual studies to address how IPV interventions can be adapted within the context of the pandemic. As many interventions have been delivered via various technologies, access to technology is of particular importance during the pandemic. Our results can inform the provision of services during the remainder of the COVID-19 pandemic including how to support women who have little access to in-person services.

3.
Eurochoices ; 19(3):34-39, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1343793

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 placed unprecedented stresses on food supply chains. Farms faced bottlenecks for some inputs, notably seasonal labour. Processing was disrupted by labour shortages and shutdowns, especially in meat processing. Air freight, important for fruits and vegetables, was severely disrupted. Demand from restaurants and food service collapsed, while retail food demand surged. Yet supply chains in the developed world have been remarkably resilient to date. Store shelves were replenished as stockpiling behaviour subsided and as supply chain actors expanded operating hours, increased staff, simplified the product range and found alternative suppliers. This rapid recovery was facilitated by policy decisions to reduce border waiting times, to streamline certification procedures and to relax regulations on trade in food. Importantly, policymakers have so far mostly avoided a repeat of the mistakes of the 2007-2008 food price crisis, which was greatly exacerbated by export bans. Some bottlenecks remain, and there may be new supply risks as Covid-19 spreads in Latin America. Overall, the biggest risk to food security is not food availability, but consumers' loss of income. Safety nets and food assistance are essential to avoid an increase in hunger, especially in developing countries.

4.
Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry ; 17:34-39, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1109441

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 placed unprecedented stresses on food supply chains. Farms faced bottlenecks for some inputs, notably seasonal labour. Processing was disrupted by labour shortages and shutdowns, especially in meat processing. Air freight, important for fruits and vegetables, was severely disrupted. Demand from restaurants and food service collapsed, while retail food demand surged. Yet supply chains in the developed world have been remarkably resilient to date. Store shelves were replenished as stockpiling behaviour subsided and as supply chain actors expanded operating hours, increased staff, simplified the product range and found alternative suppliers. This rapid recovery was facilitated by policy decisions to reduce border waiting times, to streamline certification procedures and to relax regulations on trade in food. Importantly, policymakers have so far mostly avoided a repeat of the mistakes of the 2007-2008 food price crisis, which was greatly exacerbated by export bans. Some bottlenecks remain, and there may be new supply risks as Covid-19 spreads in Latin America. Overall, the biggest risk to food security is not food availability, but consumers' loss of income. Safety nets and food assistance are essential to avoid an increase in hunger, especially in developing countries.

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