Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
1.
J Affect Disord ; 2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611791

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study examined the extent to which the network structure of anxiety and depression among adolescents identified during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic could be cross-validated in a sample of adolescents assessed after the COVID-19 peak. METHODS: Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted between February 20 and 27, 2020 and between April 11 and 19, 2020, respectively. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were assessed using 20-item the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression and 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder, respectively. Anxiety-depression networks of the first and second assessments were estimated separately using a sparse Graphical Gaussian Model combined with the graphical least absolute shrinkage and selection operator method. A Network Comparison Test was conducted to assess differences between the two networks. RESULTS: The most central symptoms in the first and second survey networks were Depressed affect and Nervousness. Compared with connections in the first survey network, connections in the second survey network analysis between Relax- Nervousness-Depressive affect-Interpersonal problems (diff, contrast: second survey-first survey. diff=-0.04, P=0.04; diff=-0.03, P=0.03; diff=-0.03, P=0.04), and Irritability-Somatic complaints (diff=-0.04, P=0.02) were weaker while connections of Somatic complaints-Nervousness (diff=0.05, P<0.001), Somatic complaints-Depressive affect (diff=0.03, P=0.009), and Irritability-Control worry-Restlessness (diff=0.02, P=0.03; diff=0.05, P=0.02) were stronger. CONCLUSIONS: Depressed affect emerged as a robust central symptom and bridge symptom across Anxiety-Depression networks. Considering the negative impact of depression and anxiety on daily life, timely interventions targeting depressed affect should be implemented to reduce the co-occurrence of anxious and depressed symptoms among adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic.

2.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(11)2021 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502548

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Following the initial manufacture of COVID-19 vaccines, numerous studies have investigated factors that influence people's vaccination intentions. However, no studies have examined links of vaccination attitudes with body-related attitudes, especially body appreciation. To address this gap in the literature, we conducted this study to disentangle the relationship between college students' COVID-19 vaccination intentions and body appreciation. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted among Chinese college students. Participants completed the Body Appreciation Scale-2 (BAS-2) and other questionnaire measures of demographics, intentions to be vaccinated, and attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccination programs. RESULTS: A total of 2058 college students participated in this study. Students who were willing to get COVID-19 vaccines had significantly higher BAS-2 scores than did those who were unwilling to receive a vaccine (3.61 ± 0.84 vs. 3.34 ± 0.92, p < 0.001). A hierarchical multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to test the association between body appreciation and COVID-19 vaccine intentions when controlling for other covariates; elevated BAS-2 scores were associated with greater willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccines (OR = 1.250, 95%CI: 1.112-1.406, p < 0.001), independent of other significant influences. CONCLUSION: Our study was the first to reveal that body appreciation is a significant factor related to college students' COVID-19 vaccination intentions. Public health interventions designed to improve people's body-appreciation levels may help in efforts to promote universal immunization.

3.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 735973, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472406

ABSTRACT

Background: Depression has been a common mental health problem during the COVID-19 epidemic. From a network perspective, depression can be conceptualized as the result of mutual interactions among individual symptoms, an approach that may elucidate the structure and mechanisms underlying this disorder. This study aimed to examine the structure of depression among residents in Wuhan, the epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak in China, in the later stage of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A total of 2,515 participants were recruited from the community via snowball sampling. The Patient Health Questionnaire was used to assess self-reported depressive symptoms with the QuestionnaireStar program. The network structure and relevant centrality indices of depression were examined in this sample. Results: Network analysis revealed Fatigue, Sad mood, Guilt and Motor disturbances as the most central symptoms, while Suicide and Sleep problems had the lowest centrality. No significant differences were found between women and men regarding network structure (maximum difference = 0.11, p = 0.44) and global strength (global strength difference = 0.04; female vs. male: 3.78 vs. 3.83, p = 0.51), a finding that suggests there are no gender differences in the structure or centrality of depressive symptoms. Limitations: Due to the cross-sectional study design, causal relationships between these depressive symptoms or dynamic changes in networks over time could not be established. Conclusions: Fatigue, Sad mood, Guilt, and Motor disturbances should be prioritized as targets in interventions and prevention efforts to reduce depression among residents in Wuhan, in the later stage of the COVID-19 pandemic.

4.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 686177, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450841

ABSTRACT

Background: Since the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic emerged, Internet usage has increased among adolescents. Due to this trend, the prevalence of Internet addiction disorder (IAD) may have increased within this group. This study examined the prevalence of IAD and its correlates among clinically stable adolescents with psychiatric disorders in China during the COVID-19 outbreak. Method: A multi-center, cross-sectional study was carried out between April 29 and June 9, 2020 in three major tertiary mental health centers in China. IAD and depressive symptoms were assessed using the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), respectively. Results: A total of 1,454 adolescent psychiatric patients were included in final analyses. The prevalence of IAD was 31.2% (95% CI: 28.8-33.6%) during the COVID-19 pandemic. A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that poor relationships with parents (P < 0.001, OR = 2.34, 95%CI: 1.49-3.68) and elevated total PHQ-9 scores (P < 0.001, OR = 1.19, 95%CI: 1.16-1.21) were significantly associated with higher risk for IAD while longer daily physical exercise durations (P = 0.04, OR = 0.67, 95%CI: 0.46-0.98) and rural residence (P = 0.003, OR = 0.62, 95%CI: 0.46-0.85) were significant correlates of lower risk for IAD. Conclusions: IAD was common among adolescent patients with clinically stable psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic; regular physical exercise, healthy relationships with parents and fewer symptoms of depression were associated with lower risk within this population.

5.
J Affect Disord ; 294: 753-760, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322168

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted the mental health and well-being of medical personnel, including nursing students. Network analysis provides a deeper characterization of symptom-symptom interactions in mental disorders. The aim of this study was to elucidate characteristics of anxiety and depressive symptom networks of Chinese nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: A total of 932 nursing students were included. Anxiety and depressive symptom were measured using the seven-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) and two-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2), respectively. Central symptoms and bridge symptoms were identified via centrality indices and bridge centrality indices, respectively. Network stability was examined using the case-dropping procedure. RESULTS: Irritability, Uncontrollable worry, Trouble relaxing, and Depressed mood had the highest centrality values. Three bridge symptoms (Depressed mood, Nervousness, and Anhedonia) were also identified. Neither gender nor region of residence was associated with network global strength, distribution of edge weights or individual edge weights. LIMITATIONS: Data were collected in a cross-sectional study design, therefore, causal relations and dynamic changes between anxiety and depressive symptoms over time could not be inferred. Generalizability of findings may be limited to Chinese nursing students during a particular phase of the current pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Irritability, Uncontrollable worry, Trouble relaxing, and Depressed mood constituted central symptoms maintaining the anxiety-depression network structure of Chinese nursing students during the pandemic. Timely, systemic multi-level interventions targeting central symptoms and bridge symptoms may be effective in alleviating co-occurring experiences of anxiety and depression in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 665507, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259397

ABSTRACT

Background: The prevalence of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in COVID-19 survivors is unclear. This study examined the prevalence of PTSS and its association with quality of life (QOL) among COVID-19 survivors during the post-COVID-19 era in China. Methods: This was a comparative, cross-sectional study. PTSS, depressive symptoms, and QOL were assessed with standardized instruments. Results: A total of 134 COVID-19 survivors and 214 non-infected controls (healthy controls hereafter) were recruited. Among COVID-19 survivors, the PTSS prevalence was 18.66% (95%CI: 11.98-25.34%), which was significantly higher than that (5.61%, 95%CI: 2.50-8.71%) of healthy controls (P < 0.001). After controlling for covariates, an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that COVID-19 survivors had a higher PTSS total score than did healthy controls [F (1,348) = 4.664, P = 0.032]. A separate ANCOVA revealed there were no significant differences in overall QOL between COVID-19 survivors with and without PTSS [F (1,348) = 1.067, P = 0.304]. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that more severe depressive symptoms were significantly associated with PTSS in COVID-19 survivors (OR = 1.425, P < 0.001). Conclusions: PTSS were more severe in COVID-19 survivors compared to healthy controls in the post-COVID-19 era. Considering their negative impact on daily life and functional outcomes, regular assessment and appropriate treatments of PTSS should be conducted in COVID-19 survivors.

7.
Global Health ; 17(1): 54, 2021 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220233

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is closely associated with physical and mental health problems; however, little is known about the severity of stigma caused by COVID-19 among its survivors. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare differences in stigma experiences of COVID-19 survivors versus healthy controls after the COVID-19 outbreak peak in China. METHODS: This cross-sectional study comprised 154 COVID-19 survivors and 194 healthy controls recruited through consecutive and convenience sampling methods, respectively. COVID-19 related stigma was measured by the Social Impact Scale (SIS). Stigma differences between the two groups were compared with analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and a generalized linear model (GLM) was used to identify independent correlates of COVID-19-related stigma in this study. RESULTS: Compared with healthy controls, COVID-19 survivors reported more overall stigma (F(1,347) = 60.82, p < 0.001), and stigma in domains of social rejection (F(1,347) = 56.54, p < 0.001), financial insecurity (F(1,347) = 19.96, p < 0.001), internalized shame (F(1,347) = 71.40, p < 0.001) and social isolation (F(1,347) = 34.73, p < 0.001). Status as a COVID-19 survivor, having family members infected with COVID-19, being married, economic loss during the COVID-19 pandemic, and depressive symptoms were positively associated with higher overall stigma levels (all p values < 0.05). CONCLUSION: COVID-19-related stigma is commonly experienced among COVID-19 survivors even though the outbreak has been well-contained in China. Routine assessment of stigma experiences should be conducted on COVID-19 survivors and appropriate psychological assistance, public education, and anti-stigma campaigns and policies should be enforced to reduce stigma within this vulnerable subpopulation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Social Stigma , Socioeconomic Factors , Adult , Analysis of Variance , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Correlation of Data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data
8.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 148, 2021 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1114701

ABSTRACT

The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is a public health emergency of international concern. In China, all schools were shut down and students were home quarantined to prevent disease spread; these steps could have potential negative effects on mental health of adolescents. This study aimed to examine changes in depression and anxiety among Chinese adolescents during the COVID-19 epidemic, and explore factors associated with depression and anxiety. Two survey administrations were conducted among Chinese adolescents between February 20 and February 27 and between April 11 and April 19, 2020, respectively. The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D) and the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) scale were used to assess depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms, respectively. A total of 9554 and 3886 adolescents participated in the first and second surveys. During the initial survey, the prevalence of depression was 36.6% (95% CI: 35.6-37.6%) while the prevalence of anxiety was 19% (95% CI: 18.2-19.8%). Rates of depression and anxiety increased to 57.0% (95% CI: 55.4-58.6%) and 36.7% (95% CI: 35.2-38.2%), respectively, in the second survey. Multivariable logistic regression analyses revealed that group membership in the second survey, female gender, senior secondary school enrollment, and concerns about entering a higher grade were positively associated with both depression and anxiety. Conversely, a sleep duration of ≥6 h/day, an exercise duration ≥30 min/day, having the same as typical or higher study efficiency during the COVID-19 outbreak, and living in provinces with 1000-9999 confirmed COVID-19 cases were negatively associated with depression and anxiety. In conclusion, compared to figures reported during the COVID-19 outbreak, the prevalence of depression and anxiety in Chinese adolescents significantly increased after the initial outbreak. Regular screening and appropriate interventions are urgently needed to reduce the risk for emotional disturbances among adolescents during and after the initial COVID-19 outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Students/psychology , Students/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Child , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
9.
Global Health ; 16(1): 119, 2020 12 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992508

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pattern of fatigue in older psychiatric patients during the COVID-19 outbreak was unknown. This study examined the prevalence of fatigue and its association with overall quality of life (overall QOL) in clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: This was a multicenter, cross-sectional study. Fatigue, depressive symptoms, pain, insomnia symptoms, and overall QOL were assessed with standardized instruments. RESULTS: A total of 1063 patients were recruited. The prevalence of fatigue was 47.1% (95%CI: 44.1-50.1%). An analysis of covariance revealed that overall QOL was significantly lower in patients with fatigue compared to those without (P = 0.011). A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that more severe depressive symptoms (OR = 1.15, P < 0.001), insomnia symptoms (OR = 1.08, P < 0.001) and pain (OR = 1.43, P < 0.001) were significantly associated with fatigue. CONCLUSIONS: Fatigue is common among clinically stable older patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 outbreak. Considering its negative impact on overall QOL, regular assessment of fatigue and appropriate treatment warrant attention in this subpopulation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fatigue/complications , Mental Disorders/complications , Pain/complications , Quality of Life , Severity of Illness Index , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/complications , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/complications , Depression/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder/complications , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pain/epidemiology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Social Isolation/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...