Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 32
Filter
1.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 24(2)2022 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1766038

ABSTRACT

Objective: To survey and analyze the experience of stigma among patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Iran.Methods: This qualitative study was conducted from September to December 2020 in the Fars, Khorasan Razavi, and Yazd provinces of Iran. Sampling was done via the snowball method. Based on data saturation criteria, 24 adults aged > 18 years who had been diagnosed with COVID-19 were recruited. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with each patient. Data were analyzed following the conventional content analysis method.Results: The results showed that during their illness with COVID-19, the participants experienced a difficult and anxious course, with rejection and alienation from their first-degree relatives taking them by surprise. The 3 main themes extracted from this study were (1) fear and rejection, (2) discrimination, and (3) loneliness. These experiences changed the attitudes of the participants toward life and themselves.Conclusions: The results show the importance of being aware of social stigma among patients and that primary care physicians play an integral role in addressing this issue, especially during pandemics. Psychological counseling sessions for those afflicted is recommended, and education and training should be provided to the public regarding the proper treatment of patients with COVID-19. Quantitative studies in this field are highly recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Humans , Qualitative Research , Social Stigma , Stereotyping , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
JAAD Int ; 7: 57-61, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1676806

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 may play a role in various immune-related dermatologic conditions. The relationship between COVID-19 and alopecia areata remains unclear. Objective: To review the existing literature for clinical studies and reports investigating the association between new-onset alopecia areata or the exacerbation of preexisting alopecia areata following infection with SARS-CoV-2. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was performed using PubMed, Embase, and MEDLINE databases from inception to October 2021. Included articles assessed alopecia areata following infection with SARS-CoV-2. Results: Of 402 total articles, 9 were identified as meeting the inclusion criteria. Six articles described case reports of 7 patients with new-onset alopecia areata following confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2, and 3 articles reported on alopecia areata recurrence or exacerbation following SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with preexisting disease. Studies investigating the exacerbation or recurrence of alopecia areata following infection reported mixed findings. Limitations: A majority of the included studies were case reports. The heterogeneity of articles precluded data synthesis. Conclusion: Alopecia areata may be a dermatologic manifestation of COVID-19, with cases most often appearing 1 to 2 months following infection. Additional research is necessary to better elucidate the relationship and draw conclusions.

14.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 22(5)2020 Oct 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841593

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Amid the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, health care workers of multiple disciplines have been designated as frontline doctors. This unforeseen situation has led to psychological problems among these health care workers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the mental health status of pan-Indian frontline doctors combating the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional, observational study was conducted among frontline doctors of tertiary care hospitals in India (East: Kolkata, West Bengal; North: New Delhi; West: Nagpur, Maharashtra; and South: Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala) from May 23, 2020, to June 6, 2020. Doctors involved in clinical services in outpatient departments, designated COVID-19 wards, screening blocks, fever clinics, and intensive care units completed an online questionnaire. The 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire and the Perceived Stress Scale were used to assess depression and perceived stress. RESULTS: The results of 422 responses revealed a 63.5% and 45% prevalence of symptoms of depression and stress, respectively, among frontline COVID-19 doctors. Postgraduate trainees constituted the majority (45.5%) of the respondents. Moderately severe and severe depression was noted in 14.2% and 3.8% of the doctors, respectively. Moderate and severe stress was noted in 37.4% and 7.6% of participants, respectively. Multivariate regression analysis showed working ≥ 6 hours/day (adjusted odds ratio: 3.5; 95% CI, 1.9-6.3; P < .0001) to be a significant risk factor for moderate or severe perceived stress, while single relationship status (adjusted odds ratio: 2.9; 95% CI, 1.5-5.9; P = .002) and working ≥ 6 hours/day (adjusted odds ratio: 10.3; 95% CI, 4.3-24.6; P < .0001) significantly contributed to the development of moderate, moderately severe, or severe depression. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic has taken a serious toll on the physical and mental health of doctors, as evident from our study. Regular screening of medical personnel involved in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with COVID-19 should be conducted to evaluate for stress, anxiety, and depression.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Depression/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Pandemics , Physicians/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Internship and Residency , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Health Questionnaire , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , Residence Characteristics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload , Young Adult
15.
Dermatol Ther ; 33(6): e14140, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696651

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus 2019 (COVID 19) was first detected in December 2019 in China. It has become a pandemic. With concern about therapies that may decrease immunity and enhance the severity of an individual's COVID-19 infection, leading to a possibly fatal outcome, use of immunosuppressants has become an important concern. This work focuses on management of various skin diseases individuals lacking immunity to COVID-19 but requiring a systemic immunosuppressant, keeping in view the challenge of the COVID 19 pandemic and that our knowledge of this virus and its effects on the immune system are incomplete including knowledge as to an individual's immunity after COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunosuppressive Agents/administration & dosage , Skin Diseases/drug therapy , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Severity of Illness Index , Skin Diseases/immunology
16.
J Dermatolog Treat ; 33(2): 1134-1135, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-684318

ABSTRACT

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been an important therapy in the treatment of a large number of cutaneous pathologies for more than three decades. Concerns have been raised that NSAIDs may be associated with an increased risk of adverse effects when used in patients with acute viral respiratory infections. Given the current SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic, the availability of reliable information for clinicians and patients is of extreme importance Although accumulating evidence support the existence of a harmful effect of NSAIDs in some infectious settings, no clinical studies demonstrating that such risk applies in case of COVID-19. Pending further research, a pragmatic and cautionary approach would be to avoid regular NSAID use or as first line option in suspicion of COVID19 symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/adverse effects , Dermatologists , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 19(9): 2169-2173, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-671663

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic has affected the world from every aspect. Individuals are drained from social, financial, and emotional percussion of this pandemic. Psychosocial consequences are far greater than are being perceived. It is anticipated that once the pandemic is over the psycho-emotional turbulence would shake the whole populations of affected countries. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To review the psychological consequences of COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A literature search was conducted on major databases from January 2020 to April 2020 with the search terms of Covid-19, Corona virus, psychological, depression, anxiety, phobias, obsessive behaviors, paranoia, parental relationship, marital life and maternal and fetal bond. CONCLUSION: Patients with COVID-19 infection are more likely to suffer from a myriad of psychological consequences, and this infection may have profound effect on parenting, relationships, marital life, elderly, and maternal-fetal bond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Age Factors , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/transmission , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Global Burden of Disease , Global Health , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Male , Maternal Behavior/psychology , Maternal-Fetal Relations/psychology , Obsessive Behavior/epidemiology , Obsessive Behavior/etiology , Obsessive Behavior/psychology , Paranoid Disorders/epidemiology , Paranoid Disorders/etiology , Paranoid Disorders/psychology , Parenting/psychology , Phobic Disorders/epidemiology , Phobic Disorders/etiology , Phobic Disorders/psychology , Pregnancy , Risk Factors , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL