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4.
JCO Clin Cancer Inform ; 5: 1096-1105, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502035

ABSTRACT

Multiple myeloma (MM) is associated with the highest symptom burden and lowest health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients with hematologic malignancies. HRQoL in MM is heterogeneous, varying over the course of disease, with the highest burden at diagnosis and relapse. Patients with MM are increasingly being treated with oral maintenance medications at home. As a result, longitudinal monitoring of medication adherence and patient-reported outcomes, including HRQoL, could inform on disease status, therapeutic tolerability, and satisfaction with care. Digital health technologies, including telemedicine, mobile health, and wearable devices, are poised to become an integral part of modern health care, in part due to the surge in telemedicine necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Although the literature has many reports on the use of digital health technologies in other types of cancers, fewer studies report on their application to MM. In the current narrative review, we survey the applications of digital health for MM. Although there is evidence that some are associated with improved health outcomes, challenges exist that must be met to ensure more widespread adoption. These include the need for increased awareness by patients and health care providers, lack of access by the typical older patient with MM, absence of randomized clinical trials, and low integration with current workflows such as electronic health records. Following our summary of technologies that could benefit patients with MM, we end by describing our vision for how they can be integrated into each phase of the patient journey.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Myeloma , Humans , Multiple Myeloma/diagnosis , Multiple Myeloma/epidemiology , Multiple Myeloma/therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Blood Cancer Discov ; 1(3): 234-243, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470534

ABSTRACT

Patients with multiple myeloma have a compromised immune system, due to both the disease and antimyeloma therapies, and may therefore be particularly susceptible to COVID-19. Here, we report outcomes and risk factors for serious disease in patients with multiple myeloma treated at five large academic centers in New York City in the spring of 2020, during which it was a global epicenter of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Of 100 patients with multiple myeloma (male 58%; median age 68) diagnosed with COVID-19, 75 were admitted; of these, 13 patients (17%) were placed on invasive mechanical ventilation, and 22 patients (29%) expired. Of the 25 nonadmitted patients, 4 were asymptomatic. There was a higher risk of adverse outcome (intensive care unit admission, mechanical ventilation, or death) in Hispanics/Latinos (n = 21), OR = 4.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.3-16.7), and African American Blacks (n = 33), OR = 3.5 (1.1-11.5), as compared with White patients (n = 36). Patients who met the adverse combined endpoint had overall higher levels of inflammatory markers and cytokine activation. None of the other studied risk factors were significantly associated (P > 0.05) with adverse outcome: hypertension (n = 56), OR = 2.2 (0.9-5.4); diabetes (n = 18), OR = 0.9 (0.3-2.9); age >65 years (n = 63), OR = 1.8 (0.7-4.6); high-dose melphalan with autologous stem cell transplant <12 months (n = 7), OR = 0.9 (0.2-5.4); and immunoglobulin G <650 mg/dL (n = 42), OR = 0.9 (0.3-2.2). In this largest cohort to date of patients with multiple myeloma and COVID-19, we found the case fatality rate to be 29% among hospitalized patients and that race/ethnicity was the most significant risk factor for adverse outcome. Significance: Patients with multiple myeloma are immunocompromised, raising the question whether they are at higher risk of severe COVID-19 disease. In this large case series on COVID-19 in patients with multiple myeloma, we report 29% mortality rates among hospitalized patients and identify race/ethnicity as the most significant risk factor for severe outcome.See related commentary by Munshi and Anderson, p. 218. This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 215.

8.
Nat Med ; 26(10): 1636-1643, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-728994

ABSTRACT

Several studies have revealed that the hyper-inflammatory response induced by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a major cause of disease severity and death. However, predictive biomarkers of pathogenic inflammation to help guide targetable immune pathways are critically lacking. We implemented a rapid multiplex cytokine assay to measure serum interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1ß in hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) upon admission to the Mount Sinai Health System in New York. Patients (n = 1,484) were followed up to 41 d after admission (median, 8 d), and clinical information, laboratory test results and patient outcomes were collected. We found that high serum IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α levels at the time of hospitalization were strong and independent predictors of patient survival (P < 0.0001, P = 0.0205 and P = 0.0140, respectively). Notably, when adjusting for disease severity, common laboratory inflammation markers, hypoxia and other vitals, demographics, and a range of comorbidities, IL-6 and TNF-α serum levels remained independent and significant predictors of disease severity and death. These findings were validated in a second cohort of patients (n = 231). We propose that serum IL-6 and TNF-α levels should be considered in the management and treatment of patients with COVID-19 to stratify prospective clinical trials, guide resource allocation and inform therapeutic options.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , Interleukin-6/immunology , Interleukin-8/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate
9.
J Hematol Oncol ; 13(1): 94, 2020 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-647080

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by SARS-CoV-2 virus, has resulted in over 100,000 deaths in the USA. Our institution has treated over 2000 COVID-19 patients during the pandemic in New York City. The pandemic directly impacted cancer patients and the organization of cancer care. Mount Sinai Hospital has a large and diverse multiple myeloma (MM) population. Herein, we report the characteristics of COVID-19 infection and serological response in MM patients in a large tertiary care institution in New York. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study on a cohort of 58 patients with a plasma-cell disorder (54 MM, 4 smoldering MM) who developed COVID-19 between March 1, 2020, and April 30, 2020. We report epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory characteristics including the persistence of viral detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody testing, treatments initiated, and outcomes. RESULTS: Of the 58 patients diagnosed with COVID-19, 36 were hospitalized and 22 were managed at home. The median age was 67 years; 52% of patients were male and 63% were non-White. Hypertension (64%), hyperlipidemia (62%), obesity (37%), diabetes mellitus (28%), chronic kidney disease (24%), and lung disease (21%) were the most common comorbidities. In the total cohort, 14 patients (24%) died. Older age (> 70 years), male sex, cardiovascular risk, and patients not in complete remission (CR) or stringent CR were significantly (p < 0.05) associated with hospitalization. Among hospitalized patients, laboratory findings demonstrated elevation of traditional inflammatory markers (CRP, ferritin, D-dimer) and a significant (p < 0.05) association between elevated inflammatory markers, severe hypogammaglobulinemia, non-White race, and mortality. Ninety-six percent (22/23) of patients developed antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 at a median of 32 days after initial diagnosis. The median time to PCR negativity was 43 (range 19-68) days from initial positive PCR. CONCLUSIONS: Drug exposure and MM disease status at the time of contracting COVID-19 had no bearing on mortality. Mounting a severe inflammatory response to SARS-CoV-2 and severe hypogammaglobulinemia was associated with higher mortality. The majority of patients mounted an antibody response to SARS-CoV-2. These findings pave a path to the identification of vulnerable MM patients who need early intervention to improve outcomes in future outbreaks of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Multiple Myeloma/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Tertiary Care Centers , Agammaglobulinemia/mortality , Agammaglobulinemia/pathology , Aged , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Inflammation/mortality , Inflammation/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Myeloma/immunology , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
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