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1.
Brain Behav Immun Health ; 20: 100420, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631479

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has negatively impacted the global healthcare and economic systems worldwide. The COVID-19 pandemic has also created an emotional and psychological pandemic among people of all ages irrespective of economic status and physical wellbeing. As a consequence of prolonged lockdowns, one of the most severely affected age groups globally is the young adults' group, especially students. Uncertainties in the academic calendar, restricted outdoor activities, and unusual daily routines during lockdowns led to higher incidences of stress, anxiety, and depression among students worldwide. In this review, we summarise the available evidence on the effect of lockdowns on students and discuss possible positive impacts of yoga and meditation on various psychological, emotional, and immunological parameters, which can significantly influence the general wellbeing and academic performance of students. Perspectives shared in the review will also bring awareness on how yoga and meditation could boost students' performance and assist them in maintaining physical and mental wellbeing during stressful conditions such as future epidemics and pandemics with novel infections. This information could help create better educational curriculums and healthy routines for students.

2.
Womens Health Rep (New Rochelle) ; 2(1): 396-399, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475763

ABSTRACT

Background: Gender inequity is apparent for women in medicine. With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, there are concerns about how women physicians are personally and professionally impacted. Materials and Methods: Participants of the Women in Medicine Summit were anonymously surveyed about their perspectives about COVID-19 affecting women in medicine. Questions were centered around perceived gender bias, productivity expectations, and stressors. Results: At the Women in Medicine Summit, 454 attendees were invited to complete the survey with a response rate of 27% (n = 124). Of those participants, 46% of participants perceived gender bias in the workplace, with 39% citing further inequities with intersectional identities (p < 0.05). Productivity expectations were reported to be higher than before the pandemic in 41% of survey participants. The majority of respondents (70%) reported experiencing high levels of stress during the pandemic, compared with only 16% reporting high levels of stress before the pandemic (p < 0.05). Discussion: It is clear that women physicians are experiencing the pandemic differently. Gender bias is a common occurrence, especially by individuals with intersectional identities. These stressors are not new to women in medicine, but with the overriding impact of the pandemic, higher expectations for productivity, and increased personal responsibilities, employers should focus on preventing further exacerbations of gender inequity in medicine.

3.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis ; 2021 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444406

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic is associated with an unprecedented requirement for intensive care unit (ICU) admission, invasive mechanical ventilation, and thereby significantly increasing the risk of secondary nosocomial pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP). Our study aims to identify the overall incidence of VAP, common organisms associated with it, and outcome in COVID-19 patients in comparison to the non-SARS-CoV-2 infected critically ill ventilated COVID-19 patients. A comprehensive screening was conducted using major electronic databases), from January 1st 2020 to May 31st 2021, as per the PRISMA statement. In our rapid review, we included a total of 34 studies (involving 8901 cases. Overall VAP was reported in 48.15 % (95% CI 42.3%-54%) mechanically ventilated COVID-19 patients and the mortality rate was 51.4% (95% CI 42.5%-60%). COVID-19 patients had increased risk of VAP and mortality in comparison to other non-SARS-CoV-2 viral pneumonia (OR=2.33; 95%CI 1.75-3.11; I2=15%, and OR=1.46; 95%CI 1.15-1.86; I2=0% respectively). Critically ill COVID-19 patients are prone to develop VAP, which worsens the outcome.

4.
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003) ; 2021 Aug 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364191

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Visual communication strategies are becoming increasingly prevalent for conveying information to health professionals as well as to the general public. The potential of social media for rapid knowledge dissemination using infographics was recognized early in the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic by health professionals. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe a coalition of health professionals' approach to developing infographics about COVID-19 vaccines and the reach and engagement of those infographics when shared through social media. METHODS: Infographics were created by a core team within the coalition following a stepwise approach. Each underwent a multistep review process, readability evaluation, and translation into Spanish. Infographics were then shared through multiple social media platforms. They were grouped into 1 of 3 categories for this analysis: COVID-19 vaccine series, myth debunkers, or other. RESULTS: All infographics had greater outreach, impressions, and engagement on Twitter than they did on other platforms. When comparing the 3 groups, no 1 infographic type was consistently performing higher than the others. CONCLUSION: Each infographic reached thousands to tens of thousands of people. We do not know whether those who viewed these infographics changed their perspective on vaccination, so we are unable to draw a conclusion about their impact on vaccine hesitancy based on this study alone.

5.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) ; 30(5): 665-671, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223313

ABSTRACT

Background: Currently, physicians face an unprecedented crisis with the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The impact of the pandemic on dual-physician households remains unknown. In this survey study, we examined the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on dual-physician families and described gendered differences related to the impact of the pandemic. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey distributed via e-mail and social media, with results collected from April 30, 2020 until May 26, 2020. Respondents were members of a dual-physician couple. Respondents provided information on demographic characteristics and the impact of the pandemic on their professional lives, personal lives, and well-being. Categorical variables were compared using chi-squared or Fisher's exact test. Ordinal variables were compared between genders using Cochran-Armitage trend test. Feeling emotionally and physically drained compared to pre-pandemic was analyzed as a binary outcome in a multivariable logistic model. Results: Of the 1799 physicians who completed the survey, 52% were between 30 and 39 years old, 81% self-identified as women, and 62% were white. Women were more likely to report increased worry about their job security, finances, personal health, partner's health, and children's health (p = 0.02, p = 0.01, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). Seventy-eight percent of respondents reported feeling more drained during the pandemic. Multivariable analysis revealed that female gender (odds ratio [OR] 2.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7-3.3, p < 0.001), and having children younger than 5 years of age (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.05-1.95, p = 0.02) were associated with an increased risk of feeling more drained. Conclusions: Women were more likely to report increased worry about job security, finances, and health and had an increased risk of feeling more drained during the pandemic. While the COVID-19 pandemic is a significant stress for all physicians, women in dual-physician families were disproportionately affected, demonstrating the need for increased support from hospital administrations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians, Women , Physicians , Adult , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Biosens Bioelectron ; 179: 113074, 2021 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064881

ABSTRACT

On global scale, the current situation of pandemic is symptomatic of increased incidences of contagious diseases caused by pathogens. The faster spread of these diseases, in a moderately short timeframe, is threatening the overall population wellbeing and conceivably the economy. The inadequacy of conventional diagnostic tools in terms of time consuming and complex laboratory-based diagnosis process is a major challenge to medical care. In present era, the development of point-of-care testing (POCT) is in demand for fast detection of infectious diseases along with "on-site" results that are helpful in timely and early action for better treatment. In addition, POCT devices also play a crucial role in preventing the transmission of infectious diseases by offering real-time testing and lab quality microbial diagnosis within minutes. Timely diagnosis and further treatment optimization facilitate the containment of outbreaks of infectious diseases. Presently, efforts are being made to support such POCT by the technological development in the field of internet of medical things (IoMT). The IoMT offers wireless-based operation and connectivity of POCT devices with health expert and medical centre. In this review, the recently developed POC diagnostics integrated or future possibilities of integration with IoMT are discussed with focus on emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases like malaria, dengue fever, influenza A (H1N1), human papilloma virus (HPV), Ebola virus disease (EVD), Zika virus (ZIKV), and coronavirus (COVID-19). The IoMT-assisted POCT systems are capable enough to fill the gap between bioinformatics generation, big rapid analytics, and clinical validation. An optimized IoMT-assisted POCT will be useful in understanding the diseases progression, treatment decision, and evaluation of efficacy of prescribed therapy.


Subject(s)
Biosensing Techniques/instrumentation , Communicable Diseases/diagnosis , Internet of Things , Point-of-Care Testing , Animals , Artificial Intelligence , Biosensing Techniques/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Dengue/diagnosis , Equipment Design , HIV Infections/diagnosis , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/diagnosis , Humans , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Malaria/diagnosis , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/diagnosis , Zika Virus Infection/diagnosis
9.
N Engl J Med ; 383(27): e145, 2020 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1003380
11.
Acad Med ; 96(6): 813-816, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-811245

ABSTRACT

Women remain underrepresented within academic medicine despite past and present efforts to promote gender equity. The authors discuss how the COVID-19 pandemic could stymie progress toward gender parity within the biomedical workforce and limit the retention and advancement of women in science and medicine. Women faculty face distinct challenges as they navigate the impact of shelter-in-place and social distancing on work and home life. An unequal division of household labor and family care between men and women means women faculty are vulnerable to inequities that may develop in the workplace as they strive to maintain academic productivity and professional development without adequate assistance with domestic tasks and family care. Emerging data suggest that gender differences in academic productivity may be forthcoming as a direct result of the pandemic. Existing gender inequities in professional visibility, networking, and collaboration may be exacerbated as activities transition from in-person to virtual environments and create new barriers to advancement. Meanwhile, initiatives designed to promote gender equity within academic medicine may lose key funding due to the economic impact of COVID-19 on higher education. To ensure that the gender gap within academic medicine does not widen, the authors call upon academic leaders and the broader biomedical community to support women faculty through deliberate actions that promote gender equity, diversity, and inclusion. The authors provide several recommendations, including faculty needs assessments; review of gender bias within tenure-clock-extension offers; more opportunities for mentorship, sponsorship, and professional recognition; and financial commitments to support equity initiatives. Leadership for these efforts should be at the institutional and departmental levels, and leaders should ensure a gender balance on task forces and committees to avoid overburdening women faculty with additional service work. Together, these strategies will contribute to the development of a more equitable workforce capable of transformative medical discovery and care.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers/ethics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/economics , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Career Mobility , Efficiency/ethics , Faculty, Medical/ethics , Female , Gender Equity , Humans , Leadership , Male , Mentors , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sexism/prevention & control , Workforce/statistics & numerical data
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