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1.
Journal of Health, Population & Nutrition ; 42(1):3, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196522

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The term "human microbiota" refers to populations of microorganisms that live harmoniously in co-existence with humans. They contribute significantly to the host's immunological response when confronted with a respiratory viral infection. However, little is known about the relationship between the human microbiome and COVID-19. Therefore, our objective is to perform a bibliometric analysis to explore the overall structure and hotspots of research activity on the links between microbiota and COVID-19 at the global level.

3.
Advances in Human Biology ; 12(2):180-189, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2155506

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The early approaches to prevent the spread of COVID-19 included lockdown and social distancing measures, leading to university closures. These measures forced unparalleled changes to the delivery of healthcare education. Concerns included the preparedness of faculty and students to e-learning as well as the routine availability and funding of equipment and internet bundles. This needed addressing with fully trained healthcare professionals required given rising inappropriate use of antibiotics in India, growing prevalence of non-communicable diseases as well as an increasing number of patients with joint comorbidities. Consequently, there is a need to ascertain the current impact of the pandemic on healthcare student education across India. Materials and Methods: This was a pilot study among 10 purposely selected healthcare educators in both private and public universities. The questionnaire built on published studies. Results: Identified challenges included a lack of familiarity with online education, no bedside teaching, lack of equipment and affordability of internet bundles, poor internet connectivity and postponed examinations. Ways forward included training faculty on e-learning, providing students with loans and other financial support to purchase equipment and internet bundles, establishing COVID-19 prevention protocols and protective equipment, recording lectures and tutorials to make up for lost time and simulated methods to teach clinical aspects. Conclusion: Despite challenges, there was a rapid move to online learning among surveyed universities. Alongside this, courses to address lack of familiarity with e-learning approaches with hybrid teaching approaches here to stay. The next step will be to undertake a wider study and to use the combined findings to provide future guidance.

4.
Cureus Journal of Medical Science ; 14(7), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2072159

ABSTRACT

Introduction: There is a growing focus on researching the management of children with COVID-19 admitted to hospital, especially among developing countries with new variants alongside concerns with the overuse of antibiotics. Patient care can be improved with guidelines, but concerns with the continued imprudent prescribing of antimicrobials, including antibiotics, antivirals, and antimalarials. Objective: Consequently, a need to document the current management of children with COVID-19 across India. Key outcome measures included the percentage of prescribed antimicrobials, adherence to current guidelines, and mortality. Methodology: A point prevalence study using specially developed report forms among 30 hospitals in India. Results: The majority of admitted children were aged between 11 and 18 years (70%) and boys (65.8%). Reasons for admission included respiratory distress, breathing difficulties, and prolonged fever. 75.3% were prescribed antibiotics typically empirically (68.3% overall), with most on the Watch list (76.7%). There were no differences in antibiotic prescribing whether hospitals followed guidelines or not. There was also appreciable prescribing of antimalarials (21.4% of children), antivirals (15.2%), and antiparasitic medicines (27.2%) despite limited evidence. The majority of children (92.2%) made a full recovery Conclusion: It was encouraging to see low hospitalization rates. However, concerns about high empiric use of antibiotics and high use of antimalarials, antivirals, and antiparasitic medicines exist. These can be addressed by instigating appropriate stewardship programs.

5.
Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology ; 15(8):3717-3724, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067732

ABSTRACT

Background: Health care workers (HCWs), being in the front line dealing with COVID-19 patients, are facing various challenges. Therefore, being aware about COVID-19 is of high importance. The overall aim of this study is to evaluate the HCWs' knowledge and attitude about COVID-19. The objectives of the study are assessment of HCWs' knowledge and attitude about COVID-19 and determining the significant factors that influence their knowledge. Methods and Materials: a descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among convenient sample (n=353) of HCWs in the UAE by using an online self-administrated questionnaire. The data was analyzed using the SPSS version 26. Mann Whitney u test and Kruskal Wallis test were used to test the differences in quantitative variables across groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association between the knowledge about COVID-19 and significant factors. A p value <0.05 was chosen as the criteria to make decisions regarding statistical significance. Result(s): A total of (353) HCWs participated in the study and completed the whole questionnaire. The average knowledge score was 76.3% with a 95% confidence interval (CI) [75.2%, 77.5%]. Of the total participants, 122 (34.6%) have poor knowledge, 81 (22.9%) have acceptable knowledge and 150(42.5%) have good knowledge. In the present study, significantly higher knowledge scores were observed in Western participants (OR 2.83;95% CI 1.51 - 5.29), General practitioners (OR 1.319;95% CI 1.03 - 1.69), participants working in Dubai (OR 1.47;95 % CI 1.28- 1.69) and participants who had been in contact with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 cases (OR 1.235;95% CI 1.11- 1.37). On the other hand, significantly lower knowledge scores were observed in participants aged 30-39 years (OR 0.760;95% CI 0.647- 0.893), Arabian participants (OR 0.76;95 % CI 0.58- 0.98) and participants with less than 1year experience (OR 0.729;95% CI 0.601- 0.883). Conclusion(s): This study revealed that HCWs working in the UAE have a good level of general knowledge about COVID-19 symptoms, transmission, progression, and prevention. Questions about deeper knowledge revealed a lower level of knowledge. Therefore, tailored awareness campaigns may be required in order to meet HCWs' needs and enhance their levels of deep knowledge. Copyright © RJPT All right reserved.

7.
Pharmaceutical Sciences ; 26:S87-S90, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-972217
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