Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 11 de 11
Filter
1.
eBioMedicine ; 83:104240, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2004031

ABSTRACT

Summary Background The live-attenuated yellow fever vaccine YF17D holds great promise as alternative viral vector vaccine platform, showcased by our previously presented potent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine candidate YF-S0. Besides protection from SARS-CoV-2, YF-S0 also induced strong yellow fever virus (YFV)-specific immunity, suggestive for full dual activity. A vaccine concomitantly protecting from SARS-CoV-2 and YFV would be of great benefit for those living in YFV-endemic areas with limited access to current SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. However, for broader applicability, pre-existing vector immunity should not impact the potency of such YF17D-vectored vaccines. Methods The immunogenicity and efficacy of YF-S0 against YFV and SARS-CoV-2 in the presence of strong pre-existing YFV immunity were evaluated in mouse and hamster challenge models. Findings Here, we show that a single dose of YF-S0 is sufficient to induce strong humoral and cellular immunity against YFV as well as SARS-CoV-2 in mice and hamsters;resulting in full protection from vigorous YFV challenge in either model;in mice against lethal intracranial YF17D challenge, and in hamsters against viscerotropic infection and liver disease following challenge with highly pathogenic hamster-adapted YFV-Asibi strain. Importantly, strong pre-existing immunity against the YF17D vector did not interfere with subsequent YF-S0 vaccination in mice or hamsters;nor with protection conferred against SARS-CoV-2 strain B1.1.7 (Alpha variant) infection in hamsters. Interpretation Our findings warrant the development of YF-S0 as dual SARS-CoV-2 and YFV vaccine. Contrary to other viral vaccine platforms, use of YF17D does not suffer from pre-existing vector immunity. Funding Stated in the acknowledgments.

2.
EBioMedicine ; 83: 104195, 2022 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1977201

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) binds to the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor, a critical component of the kallikrein-kinin system. Its dysregulation may lead to increased vascular permeability and release of inflammatory chemokines. Interactions between the kallikrein-kinin and the coagulation system might further contribute to thromboembolic complications in COVID-19. METHODS: In this observational study, we measured plasma and tissue kallikrein hydrolytic activity, levels of kinin peptides, and myeloperoxidase (MPO)-DNA complexes as a biomarker for neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from patients with and without COVID-19. FINDINGS: In BAL fluid from patients with severe COVID-19 (n = 21, of which 19 were mechanically ventilated), we observed higher tissue kallikrein activity (18·2 pM [1·2-1535·0], median [range], n = 9 vs 3·8 [0·0-22·0], n = 11; p = 0·030), higher levels of the kinin peptide bradykinin-(1-5) (89·6 [0·0-2425·0], n = 21 vs 0·0 [0·0-374·0], n = 19, p = 0·001), and higher levels of MPO-DNA complexes (699·0 ng/mL [66·0-142621·0], n = 21 vs 70·5 [9·9-960·0], n = 19, p < 0·001) compared to patients without COVID-19. INTERPRETATION: Our observations support the hypothesis that dysregulation of the kallikrein-kinin system might occur in mechanically ventilated patients with severe pulmonary disease, which might help to explain the clinical presentation of patients with severe COVID-19 developing pulmonary oedema and thromboembolic complications. Therefore, targeting the kallikrein-kinin system should be further explored as a potential treatment option for patients with severe COVID-19. FUNDING: Research Foundation-Flanders (G0G4720N, 1843418N), KU Leuven COVID research fund.

3.
Mol Ther Methods Clin Dev ; 25: 215-224, 2022 Jun 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740074

ABSTRACT

New platforms are needed for the design of novel prophylactic vaccines and advanced immune therapies. Live-attenuated yellow fever vaccine YF17D serves as a vector for several licensed vaccines and platform for novel candidates. On the basis of YF17D, we developed an exceptionally potent COVID-19 vaccine candidate called YF-S0. However, use of such live RNA viruses raises safety concerns, such as adverse events linked to original YF17D (yellow fever vaccine-associated neurotropic disease [YEL-AND] and yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease [YEL-AVD]). In this study, we investigated the biodistribution and shedding of YF-S0 in hamsters. Likewise, we introduced hamsters deficient in signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 (STAT2) signaling as a new preclinical model of YEL-AND/AVD. Compared with YF17D, YF-S0 showed improved safety with limited dissemination to brain and visceral tissues, absent or low viremia, and no shedding of infectious virus. Considering that yellow fever virus is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, any inadvertent exposure to the live recombinant vector via mosquito bites is to be excluded. The transmission risk of YF-S0 was hence compared with readily transmitting YF-Asibi strain and non-transmitting YF17D vaccine, with no evidence for productive infection of mosquitoes. The overall favorable safety profile of YF-S0 is expected to translate to other vaccines based on the same YF17D platform.

4.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-327091

ABSTRACT

New platforms are urgently needed for the design of novel prophylactic vaccines and advanced immune therapies. Live-attenuated yellow fever vaccine YF17D serves as vector for several licensed vaccines and platform for novel vaccine candidates. Based on YF17D, we developed YF-S0 as exceptionally potent COVID-19 vaccine candidate. However, use of such live RNA virus vaccines raises safety concerns, i.e., adverse events linked to original YF17D (yellow fever vaccine-associated neurotropic;YEL-AND, and viscerotropic disease;YEL-AVD). In this study, we investigated the biodistribution and shedding of YF-S0 in hamsters. Likewise, we introduced hamsters deficient in STAT2 signaling as new preclinical model of YEL-AND/AVD. Compared to parental YF17D, YF-S0 showed an improved safety with limited dissemination to brain and visceral tissues, absent or low viremia, and no shedding of infectious virus. Considering yellow fever virus is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, any inadvertent exposure to the live recombinant vector via mosquito bites is to be excluded. The transmission risk of YF-S0 was hence evaluated in comparison to readily transmitting YFV-Asibi strain and non-transmitting YF17D vaccine, with no evidence for productive infection of vector mosquitoes. The overall favorable safety profile of YF-S0 is expected to translate to other novel vaccines that are based on the same YF17D platform.

5.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-323197

ABSTRACT

Epidemiological and clinical reports have indicated that the host immune response to SARS-CoV-2, more so than viral factors, determines COVID-19 disease severity. To elucidate the immunopathology underlying COVID-19 severity, cytokine and multiplex immune profiling was performed in mild-moderate and critically-ill COVID-19 patients. Hypercytokinemia in COVID-19 differed from the IFN-γ-driven cytokine storm in macrophage activation syndrome, and was more pronounced in critical versus mild-moderate COVID-19. Systems modelling of cytokine levels followed by deep-immune profiling showed that classical monocytes drive this hyper-inflammatory phenotype and that a reduction in T-lymphocytes correlates with disease severity, with CD8+ cells being disproportionately affected. Expression of antigen presenting machinery was reduced in critical disease, while also neutrophils contributed to disease severity and local tissue damage by amplifying hypercytokinemia and neutrophil extracellular trap formation. We suggest a myeloid-driven immunopathology, in which hyperactivated neutrophils and an ineffective adaptive immune system act as mediators of COVID-19 disease severity.

6.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 6243, 2021 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493101

ABSTRACT

Understanding the pathology of COVID-19 is a global research priority. Early evidence suggests that the respiratory microbiome may be playing a role in disease progression, yet current studies report contradictory results. Here, we examine potential confounders in COVID-19 respiratory microbiome studies by analyzing the upper (n = 58) and lower (n = 35) respiratory tract microbiome in well-phenotyped COVID-19 patients and controls combining microbiome sequencing, viral load determination, and immunoprofiling. We find that time in the intensive care unit and type of oxygen support, as well as associated treatments such as antibiotic usage, explain the most variation within the upper respiratory tract microbiome, while SARS-CoV-2 viral load has a reduced impact. Specifically, mechanical ventilation is linked to altered community structure and significant shifts in oral taxa previously associated with COVID-19. Single-cell transcriptomics of the lower respiratory tract of COVID-19 patients identifies specific oral bacteria in physical association with proinflammatory immune cells, which show higher levels of inflammatory markers. Overall, our findings suggest confounders are driving contradictory results in current COVID-19 microbiome studies and careful attention needs to be paid to ICU stay and type of oxygen support, as bacteria favored in these conditions may contribute to the inflammatory phenotypes observed in severe COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/genetics , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/physiology , Humans , Microbiota/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Transcriptome/genetics
7.
Nat Microbiol ; 6(10): 1219-1232, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392860

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has claimed millions of lives and caused a global economic crisis. No effective antiviral drugs are currently available to treat infections of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The medical need imposed by the pandemic has spurred unprecedented research efforts to study coronavirus biology. Every virus depends on cellular host factors and pathways for successful replication. These proviral host factors represent attractive targets for antiviral therapy as they are genetically more stable than viral targets and may be shared among related viruses. The application of various 'omics' technologies has led to the rapid discovery of proviral host factors that are required for the completion of the SARS-CoV-2 life cycle. In this Review, we summarize insights into the proviral host factors that are required for SARS-CoV-2 infection that were mainly obtained using functional genetic and interactome screens. We discuss cellular processes that are important for the SARS-CoV-2 life cycle, as well as parallels with non-coronaviruses. Finally, we highlight host factors that could be targeted by clinically approved molecules and molecules in clinical trials as potential antiviral therapies for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Humans , Peptide Hydrolases/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
8.
Nat Genet ; 53(4): 435-444, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1123140

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has caused a global economic and health crisis. To identify host factors essential for coronavirus infection, we performed genome-wide functional genetic screens with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and human coronavirus 229E. These screens uncovered virus-specific as well as shared host factors, including TMEM41B and PI3K type 3. We discovered that SARS-CoV-2 requires the lysosomal protein TMEM106B to infect human cell lines and primary lung cells. TMEM106B overexpression enhanced SARS-CoV-2 infection as well as pseudovirus infection, suggesting a role in viral entry. Furthermore, single-cell RNA-sequencing of airway cells from patients with COVID-19 demonstrated that TMEM106B expression correlates with SARS-CoV-2 infection. The present study uncovered a collection of coronavirus host factors that may be exploited to develop drugs against SARS-CoV-2 infection or future zoonotic coronavirus outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Genome, Human/genetics , Genome-Wide Association Study/methods , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Nerve Tissue Proteins/genetics , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/cytology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line, Tumor , Cells, Cultured , Coronavirus 229E, Human/genetics , Epidemics , Epithelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Proviruses/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Internalization
9.
Cell Res ; 31(3): 272-290, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039635

ABSTRACT

How the innate and adaptive host immune system miscommunicate to worsen COVID-19 immunopathology has not been fully elucidated. Here, we perform single-cell deep-immune profiling of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from 5 patients with mild and 26 with critical COVID-19 in comparison to BALs from non-COVID-19 pneumonia and normal lung. We use pseudotime inference to build T-cell and monocyte-to-macrophage trajectories and model gene expression changes along them. In mild COVID-19, CD8+ resident-memory (TRM) and CD4+ T-helper-17 (TH17) cells undergo active (presumably antigen-driven) expansion towards the end of the trajectory, and are characterized by good effector functions, while in critical COVID-19 they remain more naïve. Vice versa, CD4+ T-cells with T-helper-1 characteristics (TH1-like) and CD8+ T-cells expressing exhaustion markers (TEX-like) are enriched halfway their trajectories in mild COVID-19, where they also exhibit good effector functions, while in critical COVID-19 they show evidence of inflammation-associated stress at the end of their trajectories. Monocyte-to-macrophage trajectories show that chronic hyperinflammatory monocytes are enriched in critical COVID-19, while alveolar macrophages, otherwise characterized by anti-inflammatory and antigen-presenting characteristics, are depleted. In critical COVID-19, monocytes contribute to an ATP-purinergic signaling-inflammasome footprint that could enable COVID-19 associated fibrosis and worsen disease-severity. Finally, viral RNA-tracking reveals infected lung epithelial cells, and a significant proportion of neutrophils and macrophages that are involved in viral clearance.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity , Bronchoalveolar Lavage , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate , Single-Cell Analysis , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/cytology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/cytology , Cell Communication , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Lung/virology , Macrophages, Alveolar/cytology , Monocytes/cytology , Neutrophils/cytology , Phenotype , Principal Component Analysis , RNA-Seq , Th17 Cells/cytology
10.
Nature ; 590(7845): 320-325, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-953381

ABSTRACT

The expanding pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) requires the development of safe, efficacious and fast-acting vaccines. Several vaccine platforms are being leveraged for a rapid emergency response1. Here we describe the development of a candidate vaccine (YF-S0) for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that uses live-attenuated yellow fever 17D (YF17D) vaccine as a vector to express a noncleavable prefusion form of the SARS-CoV-2 spike antigen. We assess vaccine safety, immunogenicity and efficacy in several animal models. YF-S0 has an excellent safety profile and induces high levels of SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies in hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), mice (Mus musculus) and cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), and-concomitantly-protective immunity against yellow fever virus. Humoral immunity is complemented by a cellular immune response with favourable T helper 1 polarization, as profiled in mice. In a hamster model2 and in macaques, YF-S0 prevents infection with SARS-CoV-2. Moreover, a single dose conferred protection from lung disease in most of the vaccinated hamsters within as little as 10 days. Taken together, the quality of the immune responses triggered and the rapid kinetics by which protective immunity can be attained after a single dose warrant further development of this potent SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Genetic Vectors/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, Attenuated/immunology , Yellow Fever Vaccine/genetics , Animals , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , Cricetinae , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Glycosylation , Macaca fascicularis/genetics , Macaca fascicularis/immunology , Macaca fascicularis/virology , Male , Mesocricetus/genetics , Mesocricetus/immunology , Mesocricetus/virology , Mice , Safety , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vaccines, Attenuated/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Attenuated/adverse effects , Vaccines, Attenuated/genetics
11.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 5838, 2020 11 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-933686

ABSTRACT

Emergence of SARS-CoV-2 causing COVID-19 has resulted in hundreds of thousands of deaths. In search for key targets of effective therapeutics, robust animal models mimicking COVID-19 in humans are urgently needed. Here, we show that Syrian hamsters, in contrast to mice, are highly permissive to SARS-CoV-2 and develop bronchopneumonia and strong inflammatory responses in the lungs with neutrophil infiltration and edema, further confirmed as consolidations visualized by micro-CT alike in clinical practice. Moreover, we identify an exuberant innate immune response as key player in pathogenesis, in which STAT2 signaling plays a dual role, driving severe lung injury on the one hand, yet restricting systemic virus dissemination on the other. Our results reveal the importance of STAT2-dependent interferon responses in the pathogenesis and virus control during SARS-CoV-2 infection and may help rationalizing new strategies for the treatment of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , STAT2 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Animals , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Cricetinae , Immunity, Innate , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mice , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , STAT2 Transcription Factor/genetics , Virus Replication
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL