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1.
Progress in Neurology and Psychiatry ; 26(2):29-32, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1826101

ABSTRACT

The link and association between COVID‐19 and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is controversial. This study aims to investigate whether COVID‐19 was associated with a different presenting clinical picture or a more severe course of illness (eg intubation and death) in people with AD in this study cohort.

2.
Iran J Public Health ; 51(1): 172-177, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1716270

ABSTRACT

Background: Identifying effective biomarkers plays a critical role on screening; rapid diagnosis; proper managements and therapeutic options, which is helpful in preventing serious complications. The present study aimed to compare the liver laboratory tests between alive and dead hospitalized cases for prediction and proper management of the patients. Methods: This retrospective, cross sectional study consists of all deceased patients admitted in one center in Shiraz, Iran during 19 Feb 2020 to 22 Aug 2021. For further comparison, we selected a 1:2 ratios alive group randomly. Results: Overall, 875 hospitalized cases died due to COVID-19. We selected 1750 alive group randomly. The median age was significantly higher in died group (65.96 vs 51.20). Regarding the laboratory findings during the hospitalization ALT, AST, Bili.D were significantly higher in non-survivors than survivors but Albumin was less in deceased patients. It was revealed elevated levels of Albumin, AST, Bili.T and Bili.D were associated with increasing the risk of in hospital death. Moreover, the predictive effect of ALP and Bili.D had significantly more than others with high sensitivity and specify. Conclusion: We found patients with COVID-19 have reduced serum albumin level, and increase ALT and AST. The current results revealed abnormal liver chemistries is associated with poor outcome, which highlighted the importance of monitoring these patients more carefully and should be given more caution.

3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-305054

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite the whole world’s effort for controlling, an ongoing global outbreak of lower respiratory tract disease, caused by new corona virus;led to a major public health issue. Current study aims to evaluate the characteristics of infected case in Fars, Iran Methods: : According to the referral of suspicious patients during one month, 2538 samples were evaluated and extracted for Viral RNA nucleic acids by using the Invitrogen ChargeSwitch® Total RNA Cell Kit (Invitrogen Co.). Data were recorded based on the standardized data collection forms shared by WHO and the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium. Results: : By 19 March 2020, 440 admitted patients had been identified with CoVID-19 confirmation. More than 50% of cases were men. Mean age were estimated 48.15 ±18.07. Of all the patients, 30 (6.81%) had a history of travel to Qom city, which was the first infected zone in Iran, also 92(20.90%) had close contact with contaminated or suspected individuals. The mortality rate was estimated 2. 95% (13 cases). Cardiovascular disease (25, 5.68%), diabetes (33, 7.5%), and hypertension (35, 7.95%) were the most common co-existing disorders. Patients with underlying disease are more in danger of death [OR: 11.64, (95%CI 3.14 – 43.18), p= 0.0002]. Conclusion: Human to human transmission of SARS-CoV-II causes Fars province in southwest of Iran become infected and 440 cases identified during one month. The SARS-Cov-2 is more likely to affect male sex and individuals with old age and underlying disorders.

4.
Murray, Christopher J. L.; Ikuta, Kevin Shunji, Sharara, Fablina, Swetschinski, Lucien, Robles Aguilar, Gisela, Gray, Authia, Han, Chieh, Bisignano, Catherine, Rao, Puja, Wool, Eve, Johnson, Sarah C.; Browne, Annie J.; Chipeta, Michael Give, Fell, Frederick, Hackett, Sean, Haines-Woodhouse, Georgina, Kashef Hamadani, Bahar H.; Kumaran, Emmanuelle A. P.; McManigal, Barney, Agarwal, Ramesh, Akech, Samuel, Albertson, Samuel, Amuasi, John, Andrews, Jason, Aravkin, Aleskandr, Ashley, Elizabeth, Bailey, Freddie, Baker, Stephen, Basnyat, Buddha, Bekker, Adrie, Bender, Rose, Bethou, Adhisivam, Bielicki, Julia, Boonkasidecha, Suppawat, Bukosia, James, Carvalheiro, Cristina, Castañeda-Orjuela, Carlos, Chansamouth, Vilada, Chaurasia, Suman, Chiurchiù, Sara, Chowdhury, Fazle, Cook, Aislinn J.; Cooper, Ben, Cressey, Tim R.; Criollo-Mora, Elia, Cunningham, Matthew, Darboe, Saffiatou, Day, Nicholas P. J.; De Luca, Maia, Dokova, Klara, Dramowski, Angela, Dunachie, Susanna J.; Eckmanns, Tim, Eibach, Daniel, Emami, Amir, Feasey, Nicholas, Fisher-Pearson, Natasha, Forrest, Karen, Garrett, Denise, Gastmeier, Petra, Giref, Ababi Zergaw, Greer, Rachel Claire, Gupta, Vikas, Haller, Sebastian, Haselbeck, Andrea, Hay, Simon I.; Holm, Marianne, Hopkins, Susan, Iregbu, Kenneth C.; Jacobs, Jan, Jarovsky, Daniel, Javanmardi, Fatemeh, Khorana, Meera, Kissoon, Niranjan, Kobeissi, Elsa, Kostyanev, Tomislav, Krapp, Fiorella, Krumkamp, Ralf, Kumar, Ajay, Kyu, Hmwe Hmwe, Lim, Cherry, Limmathurotsakul, Direk, Loftus, Michael James, Lunn, Miles, Ma, Jianing, Mturi, Neema, Munera-Huertas, Tatiana, Musicha, Patrick, Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa Marcia, Nakamura, Tomoka, Nanavati, Ruchi, Nangia, Sushma, Newton, Paul, Ngoun, Chanpheaktra, Novotney, Amanda, Nwakanma, Davis, Obiero, Christina W.; Olivas-Martinez, Antonio, Olliaro, Piero, Ooko, Ednah, Ortiz-Brizuela, Edgar, Peleg, Anton Yariv, Perrone, Carlo, Plakkal, Nishad, Ponce-de-Leon, Alfredo, Raad, Mathieu, Ramdin, Tanusha, Riddell, Amy, Roberts, Tamalee, Robotham, Julie Victoria, Roca, Anna, Rudd, Kristina E.; Russell, Neal, Schnall, Jesse, Scott, John Anthony Gerard, Shivamallappa, Madhusudhan, Sifuentes-Osornio, Jose, Steenkeste, Nicolas, Stewardson, Andrew James, Stoeva, Temenuga, Tasak, Nidanuch, Thaiprakong, Areerat, Thwaites, Guy, Turner, Claudia, Turner, Paul, van Doorn, H. Rogier, Velaphi, Sithembiso, Vongpradith, Avina, Vu, Huong, Walsh, Timothy, Waner, Seymour, Wangrangsimakul, Tri, Wozniak, Teresa, Zheng, Peng, Sartorius, Benn, Lopez, Alan D.; Stergachis, Andy, Moore, Catrin, Dolecek, Christiane, Naghavi, Mohsen.
Lancet ; 399(10325): 629-655, 2022 02 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1624565

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) poses a major threat to human health around the world. Previous publications have estimated the effect of AMR on incidence, deaths, hospital length of stay, and health-care costs for specific pathogen-drug combinations in select locations. To our knowledge, this study presents the most comprehensive estimates of AMR burden to date. METHODS: We estimated deaths and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) attributable to and associated with bacterial AMR for 23 pathogens and 88 pathogen-drug combinations in 204 countries and territories in 2019. We obtained data from systematic literature reviews, hospital systems, surveillance systems, and other sources, covering 471 million individual records or isolates and 7585 study-location-years. We used predictive statistical modelling to produce estimates of AMR burden for all locations, including for locations with no data. Our approach can be divided into five broad components: number of deaths where infection played a role, proportion of infectious deaths attributable to a given infectious syndrome, proportion of infectious syndrome deaths attributable to a given pathogen, the percentage of a given pathogen resistant to an antibiotic of interest, and the excess risk of death or duration of an infection associated with this resistance. Using these components, we estimated disease burden based on two counterfactuals: deaths attributable to AMR (based on an alternative scenario in which all drug-resistant infections were replaced by drug-susceptible infections), and deaths associated with AMR (based on an alternative scenario in which all drug-resistant infections were replaced by no infection). We generated 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs) for final estimates as the 25th and 975th ordered values across 1000 posterior draws, and models were cross-validated for out-of-sample predictive validity. We present final estimates aggregated to the global and regional level. FINDINGS: On the basis of our predictive statistical models, there were an estimated 4·95 million (3·62-6·57) deaths associated with bacterial AMR in 2019, including 1·27 million (95% UI 0·911-1·71) deaths attributable to bacterial AMR. At the regional level, we estimated the all-age death rate attributable to resistance to be highest in western sub-Saharan Africa, at 27·3 deaths per 100 000 (20·9-35·3), and lowest in Australasia, at 6·5 deaths (4·3-9·4) per 100 000. Lower respiratory infections accounted for more than 1·5 million deaths associated with resistance in 2019, making it the most burdensome infectious syndrome. The six leading pathogens for deaths associated with resistance (Escherichia coli, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were responsible for 929 000 (660 000-1 270 000) deaths attributable to AMR and 3·57 million (2·62-4·78) deaths associated with AMR in 2019. One pathogen-drug combination, meticillin-resistant S aureus, caused more than 100 000 deaths attributable to AMR in 2019, while six more each caused 50 000-100 000 deaths: multidrug-resistant excluding extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, third-generation cephalosporin-resistant E coli, carbapenem-resistant A baumannii, fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli, carbapenem-resistant K pneumoniae, and third-generation cephalosporin-resistant K pneumoniae. INTERPRETATION: To our knowledge, this study provides the first comprehensive assessment of the global burden of AMR, as well as an evaluation of the availability of data. AMR is a leading cause of death around the world, with the highest burdens in low-resource settings. Understanding the burden of AMR and the leading pathogen-drug combinations contributing to it is crucial to making informed and location-specific policy decisions, particularly about infection prevention and control programmes, access to essential antibiotics, and research and development of new vaccines and antibiotics. There are serious data gaps in many low-income settings, emphasising the need to expand microbiology laboratory capacity and data collection systems to improve our understanding of this important human health threat. FUNDING: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Wellcome Trust, and Department of Health and Social Care using UK aid funding managed by the Fleming Fund.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Global Burden of Disease , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Global Health , Humans , Models, Statistical
5.
Epilepsy Behav ; 122: 108207, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294313

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We performed a follow-up study of patients with COVID-19 presenting with seizures. METHODS: All consecutive patients with seizures, who were referred to Namazee Hospital, Shiraz, Iran, with a diagnosis of COVID-19, from 10 August 2020 until 20 October 2020 were included in this longitudinal study. The clinical data were collected by the admitting physician. In a follow-up phone call to the discharged patients (after eight weeks or more), we inquired their seizure outcome. RESULTS: In total, 32 patients were studied; 28 patients were followed. Twelve patients (37.5%) presented with a single tonic-clonic seizure and nine (28.1%) had convulsive status epilepticus; one patient had functional (psychogenic) seizures. Ten patients (31.3%) had pre-existing epilepsy, eight others (25%) had pre-existing CNS problems (without epilepsy), one person (3.1%) had pre-existing functional seizures, and 13 individuals (40.1%) neither had epilepsy nor had other CNS problems. Eight patients (28.6%) reported experiencing seizure(s) after being discharged from the hospital; six of these had pre-existing epilepsy and one had pre-existing functional seizures. One patient, who had a newly developed ischemic brain infarction, reported experiencing recurrent seizures. CONCLUSION: Seizures in patients with COVID-19 are either acute symptomatic (in about two-thirds) or an exacerbation of a pre-existing epilepsy/functional seizures (in about one-third). A thorough investigation of the underlying etiology of seizures in patients with COVID-19 is necessary. Seizure outcome in patients, who are hospitalized with COVID-19 and seizures, is generally good.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/complications , Seizures/drug therapy
6.
Obes Med ; 25: 100352, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230694

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with diabetes are one of the most high-risk group to become infected with SARS-CoV-2. Current study was designed to evaluate the risk of other complications in COVID-19 patients with diabetes. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study (25 February to July 10, 2020), 458 patients with diabetes were enrolled based on their characteristics, symptoms and signs, laboratory data and presence of other underlying diseases. Multiple logistic regression and Chi-square test analysis were used to check the effectiveness of other comorbidities on the mortality outcome among patients with diabetes. RESULTS: Of 458 patients with diabetes, 306 (67%) had other underlying diseases, such as 200 (65.4%) hypertension, 103 (33.7%) cardiovascular diseases and 29 (9.5%) kidney diseases. The rate of fatality was significantly high in patients with chronic kidney and liver diseases. The odds of mortality were increased 3.1-fold for patients over 55 years as compared to those under 55 years (P = 0.011), and the odds of mortality outcome were more than 5.1-fold for those who had chronic kidney disease (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The presentation of SARS-CoV-2 in older patients with diabetes with other comorbidities such as chronic kidney and liver diseases is more severe in risk of mortality.

7.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-3, 2021 May 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211232

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine whether COVID-19 is associated with a different presenting clinical picture or a more severe course of illness in people with a past history of chemical war injury. METHODS: This is a multicenter retrospective study in Fars Province, Iran, from August 22 to October 4, 2020. People with a past history of chemical war injury and COVID-19 were studied. Two age- and sex-matched control groups, double the size of the patient group each, from the same database of patients with COVID-19 who were hospitalized at the same time (ie, healthy controls and pseudocontrols). RESULTS: A total of 46 people with a past history of chemical war injury, 92 healthy controls, and 92 pseudocontrols were studied. People with COVID-19 and a past history of chemical war injury had a significantly higher rate of chest pain compared with others. There were no other clinical differences between the groups. Mortality rate was 17.39%, 15.21%, and 27.17% in people with a past history of chemical war injury, the control group, and the pseudocontrol group, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: A past history of a chemical war injury does not add to the risk of COVID-19 and does not significantly modify its clinical picture either.

8.
Acta Neurologica Scandinavica ; 143(6):624-628, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1208836

ABSTRACT

ObjectiveTo determine whether patients with epilepsy (PWE) are particularly over‐represented in a very large cohort of patients with COVID‐19. We also investigated whether COVID‐19 is associated with a different clinical picture or a more severe course of illness in PWE (compared with others).MethodsAll consecutive patients who referred to and admitted at healthcare facilities anywhere in Fars province (located in the south of Iran with a population of 4,851,000 people) from February 19, 2020 until November 20, 2020 were included.ResultsA total of 37,968 patients were studied. Eighty‐two patients (0.2%) had pre‐existing epilepsy. Seizures were significantly more frequent among PWE as a presenting manifestation of COVID‐19 compared with that in people without epilepsy (Odds Ratio = 27;p = 0.0001). Furthermore, PWE less often reported cough (significantly) and more often had gastrointestinal symptoms (vomiting and anorexia;as trends) compared with those in people without epilepsy. Patients with epilepsy were not differently likely to be intubated or admitted at ICUs. Case fatality rates were not different between the two groups [9.8% in PWE and 8.5% in people without epilepsy;p = 0.690].ConclusionPatients with epilepsy are not susceptible to contracting COVID‐19 more than other individuals. Furthermore, COVID‐19 in PWE is not associated with a more severe illness or a poorer prognosis. However, PWE and COVID‐19 may present somewhat differently than others with such an illness. Why PWE less often present with cough and more often present with gastrointestinal symptoms is not clear yet and should be investigated and clarified in the future studies.

9.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-4, 2021 Apr 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169326

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: A year after the emergence of a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), as a new crisis in respiratory infections, there remain many uncertainties and unknowns about SARS-CoV-2 and the disease it causes, called coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Although COVID-19 is known as a respiratory disease, some atypical manifestations have been seen, different from those seen in other types of viral respiratory infections. This paper aims to describe designing, launching, and implementing a data collection system for all respiratory diseases, with a focus on SARS-CoV-2 from the onset of this pandemic. METHOD: The current registry is designed in compliance with the standard Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) guidelines, along with the declaration of Helsinki principles. RESULTS: A respiratory disease registry, with an emphasis on COVID-19 and other co-infections, was developed. Data consisted of demographic, clinical, and supporting information about SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory viral diseases. CONCLUSION: It is hoped that the current data registry will facilitate patient evaluation and improve the outcomes of cases of respiratory infection defined by a particular condition, disease, or exposure. Moreover, the registry can harmonize data about the treatment, outcomes, and well-being of patients who receive care over time, and identify best practices.

10.
Neurol Sci ; 42(5): 1649-1652, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1056021

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of the current study was to determine whether COVID-19 is associated with a different presenting clinical picture or a more severe course of illness in people with Down syndrome (DS). METHODS: All consecutive patients who were admitted at healthcare facilities anywhere in Fars province (located in the south of Iran with a population of 4,851,000 people) from 19 February 2020 to 20 November 2020 were included. For every patient with DS, three age- and sex-matched patients with COVID-19 and without any underlying medical conditions were selected as controls. RESULTS: During the study period, 37,968 patients were hospitalized with a diagnosis of COVID-19. Eighteen patients had DS. Patients with DS were significantly more likely to be intubated [7 patients (39%)] compared with those without DS [3 patients (6%)]; p = 0.002. Patients with DS significantly more often died of COVID-19 compared with the controls [8 (44.4%) vs. 1 (1.9%); odds ratio: 24.37; 95% confidence interval 2.39-247.94; p = 0.007]. CONCLUSION: Patients with DS are among the high-risk populations with respect to severe COVID-19 and should receive the vaccine as soon as possible. Furthermore, they should receive more intensive care if they get hospitalized with the illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Down Syndrome , Down Syndrome/complications , Down Syndrome/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
11.
World J Plast Surg ; 9(3): 331-338, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-918636

ABSTRACT

Despite the whole world's effort for controlling an ongoing global outbreak caused by new corona virus; it is still a major public health issue. Any hospitalized patient or outpatient in burn departments should be considered as a potential infectious source of COVID-19, which may cause an overwhelming of disease. However, there are no previous experiences about COVID-19 in burn patients all over the world, and here we reported two burn cases at Amir-al-Momenin Burn Hospital Affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran with skin manifestations, which were detected as a rarely COVID-19 symptom. A 13-year-old girl [total body surface area (TBSA): 18%] and a 37-year-old woman (TBSA: 30%) who had burn injuries by gas explosion and car accident, respectively were enrolled. After admission, some vesicular injuries were visible in burn area. To confirm, skin biopsy specimens were either sent for histopathology examination or for real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as follow: Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV), chicken pox, and potassium hydroxide (KOH) for fungal infections. All test results were negative. Although they had no symptoms of COVID-19, two swabs from nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal samplings were taken, the result was negative either. Specimens were obtained from vesicular lesions for qRT-PCR assay of COVID-19. According to the molecular results for vesicular samples, all the results were positive for COVID-19. Unlike all other COVID-19 patients who have respiratory symptoms, SARS-COV-2 appeared by cutaneous vesicular and blisters in two burn cases.

12.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0241265, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-890196

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Underlying disease have a critical role in vulnerability of populations for a greater morbidity and mortality when they suffer from COVID-19. The aim of current study is evaluating the prevalence of underlying disease in died people with COVID-19. METHODS: The current study have been conducted according to PRISMA guideline. International database including PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Cochrane and google scholar were searched for relevant studies up to 1 June. All relevant articles that reported underlying disease in died cases of COVID-19 were included in the analysis. RESULTS: After screening and excluding duplicated and irrelevant studies, 32 articles included in the analysis. The most prevalent comorbidities were hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, liver disease, lung disease, malignancy, cerebrovascular disease, COPD and asthma. Among all reported underlying disease, highest and lowest prevalence was related to hypertension and asthma which were estimated 46% (37% - 55%) and 3% (2%- 6%), respectively. CONCLUSION: In summary, underlying disease have a critical role in poor outcomes, severity of disease and high mortality rate of COVID-19 cases. Patients with hypertension, cardiovascular disease and diabetes should be carefully monitored and be aware of health protocols.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Hypertension/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
13.
Neurol Sci ; 41(11): 3057-3061, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-777864

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the current study was to collect the data on the occurrence of seizures in patients with COVID-19 and to clarify the circumstances of the occurrence of seizures in these patients. METHODS: All consecutive patients who referred to healthcare facilities anywhere in Fars province (located in South Iran with a population of 4.851 million people) from February 19 until June 2, 2020, and had confirmed COVID-19 by positive result on polymerase chain reaction testing and seizure were included. RESULTS: During the study period, 6,147 people had confirmed COVID-19 in Fars province, Iran; 110 people died from the illness (case fatality rate 1.79%). During this time period, five people had seizures (seizure rate 0.08%). In four patients, seizure was one of the presenting manifestations, and in one person, it happened during the course of hospital admission. Two patients had status epilepticus. All patients experienced hypoxemia and four of them needed respirator. Two patients had related metabolic derangements and one had cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytic pleocytosis. Brain imaging was abnormal in three patients. Four patients died. CONCLUSION: New-onset seizures in critically ill patients with COVID-19 should be considered as acute symptomatic seizures and the treating physician should try to determine the etiology of the seizure and manage the cause immediately and appropriately. Detailed clinical, neurological, imaging, and electrophysiological investigations and attempts to isolate SARS-CoV-2 from CSF may clarify the role played by this virus in causing seizures in these patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Seizures/virology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/epidemiology
14.
Clin Exp Hypertens ; 43(1): 77-80, 2021 Jan 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-726986

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: A life-threatening respiratory disease, coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19), has spread across the globe since December 2019. Many prognostic factors have already been put forward to predict the risk of death and other outcomes. The current study is evaluating the survival rate between hypertensive and non-hypertensive infected patients. METHODS: Patients who were included in this study were admitted between 20 February to 1 March 2020 in Fars (southwest of Iran) province hospitals. Data were collected from the electronic base registry which contained demographic information, medical symptoms, and signs, underlying diseases, CT scan results, and final outcome. RESULTS: Of all 1239 positive cases, 159 (12.83%) had known with hypertension ant this group was significantly older than non-hypertensive patients (66.1 years Vs 48.95 years, p < .001). According to Kaplan-Meier survival curve and log-rank test, it was seen hypertensive patients deteriorated more rapidly than non-hypertensive group (p = .032). Moreover, HIV, cardiovascular, and kidney disease were diagnosed as factors that increase the risk of death in hypertensive patients. CONCLUSION: The current study about the survival rate of COVID-19 patients had shown hypertensive patents are in danger of disease severity, although it may be related to their age. Moreover, the probability of other complications like diabetes, smoking, asthma, kidney, and cardiovascular diseases, and either some other infections such as HIV can make the condition complicated and need more consideration to prevent noxious outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Hypertension/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Kidney Diseases/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Registries , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate
15.
Infect Ecol Epidemiol ; 10(1): 1781330, 2020 Jun 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-644782

ABSTRACT

Emergence of a new coronavirus causes a serious concern whether this can be stopped at all. The ongoing coronavirus disease created a substantial variation in the fatality rate over the world. The current report brought an explore about the epidemiological characteristics of deceased patients and the fatality rate after the first peak in Fars province which is the fourth most populous and large province in Iran. Of the 3702 confirmed cases with coVID-19, 87 patients passed away and so the fatality rate estimated 2.35. Also, it was derived that male sex, old age and underlying diseases especially diabetes were common characteristics of these victims.

16.
Dermatol Ther ; 33(4): e13627, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-327229

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has made various challenges for communications all over the world. Nowadays hand hygiene practices with alcohol sanitizers are an unavoidable reality for many people, which cause skin dryness and flaking. The current short communication has been explained about monitoring the quality control of alcohol concentrations and hand rub formulation, which needs more attention and should consider meticulous in this crisis.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Ethanol/pharmacology , Hand Hygiene/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Anti-Infective Agents, Local/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Arch Acad Emerg Med ; 8(1): e35, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-30033

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In the beginning of 2020, an unexpected outbreak due to a new corona virus made the headlines all over the world. Exponential growth in the number of those affected makes this virus such a threat. The current meta-analysis aimed to estimate the prevalence of underlying disorders in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. METHODS: A comprehensive systematic search was performed on PubMed, Scopus, Web of science, and Google scholar, to find articles published until 15 February 2020. All relevant articles that reported clinical characteristics and epidemiological information of hospitalized COVID-19 patients were included in the analysis. RESULTS: The data of 76993 patients presented in 10 articles were included in this study. According to the meta-analysis, the pooled prevalence of hypertension, cardiovascular disease, smoking history and diabetes in people infected with SARS-CoV-2 were estimated as 16.37% (95%CI: 10.15%-23.65%), 12.11% (95%CI 4.40%-22.75%), 7.63% (95%CI 3.83%-12.43%) and 7.87% (95%CI 6.57%-9.28%), respectively. CONCLUSION: According to the findings of the present study, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), malignancy, and chronic kidney disease were among the most prevalent underlying diseases among hospitalized COVID-19 patients, respectively.

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