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1.
Front Psychol ; 13: 845024, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785412

ABSTRACT

Background: Burnout (BO) is a recognized challenge among the oncology workforce. It affects both genders with a higher frequency among women. This study examined the factors contributing to the development of burnout among female oncologists from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Methods: An online cross-sectional survey was distributed to oncology professionals from different countries in the MENA region. The validated Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) of emotional exhaustion (EE), Depersonalization (DE), and Personal Achievement (PA) plus questions about demography/work-related factors and attitudes toward oncology were included. Data were analyzed to measure BO prevalence and related factors. Results: Between 10 February and 15 March 2020, 545 responses were submitted by female oncologists. The responses pre-dated the COVID-19 pandemic emergence in the region. BO prevalence was 71% among female professionals. Women aged <44 years represented 85% of the cohort. Sixty-two percent were married, 52% with children and one-third practiced a hobby. Two-thirds worked in medical oncology, worked for <10 years and 35% worked in academia. The majority (73%) spent >25% on administrative work daily. Nearly half of the respondents (49%) expressed a recurring thought of quitting oncology and 70% had no burnout support or education. Inability to deliver optimal care was reported as distressing for career development in 82%. Factors significantly influencing the BO risk were identified. Marital status, having children, academia and years in practice did not impact the risk of BO among female oncologists from MENA. Conclusion: Female oncologists from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) were found to have a high prevalence of BO. In this cohort, the majority of women oncology workers were young and in their early to mid-career stages. Burnout was linked to being younger, practicing in North African nations, having a heavy administrative load, and having persistent thoughts of quitting. Practicing a hobby and engaging in oncology communication, on the other hand, reduced the chance of BO. Burnout support and education, specifically for oncology women, is required.

2.
JCO Oncol Pract ; 18(4): e426-e441, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484816

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: People with cancer are at increased risk for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. ASCO's COVID-19 registry promotes systematic data collection across US oncology practices. METHODS: Participating practices enter data on patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection in cancer treatment. In this analysis, we focus on all patients with hematologic or regional or metastatic solid tumor malignancies. Primary outcomes are 30- and 90-day mortality rates and change over time. RESULTS: Thirty-eight practices provided data for 453 patients from April to October 2020. Sixty-two percent had regional or metastatic solid tumors. Median age was 64 years. Forty-three percent were current or previous cigarette users. Patients with B-cell malignancies age 61-70 years had twice mortality risk (hazard ratio = 2.1 [95% CI, 1.3 to 3.3]) and those age > 70 years had 4.5 times mortality risk (95% CI, 1.8 to 11.1) compared with patients age ≤ 60 years. Association between survival and age was not significant in patients with metastatic solid tumors (P = .12). Tobacco users had 30-day mortality estimate of 21% compared with 11% for never users (log-rank P = .005). Patients diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 before June 2020 had 30-day mortality rate of 20% (95% CI, 14% to 25%) compared with 13% (8% to 18%) for those diagnosed in or after June 2020 (P = .08). The 90-day mortality rate for pre-June patients was 28% (21% to 34%) compared with 21% (13% to 28%; P = .20). CONCLUSION: Older patients with B-cell malignancies were at increased risk for death (unlike older patients with metastatic solid tumors), as were all patients with cancer who smoke tobacco. Diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 later in 2020 was associated with more favorable 30- and 90-day mortality, likely related to more asymptomatic cases and improved clinical management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Proportional Hazards Models , Registries , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
3.
Ecancermedicalscience ; 15: 1275, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369660

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had ramifications for most healthcare activities, including medical education and communication aspects. Virtual educational meetings and activities (VEMAs) have been utilised tremendously in the pandemic era, reflecting a transition to new horizons of cyberspace. This creates the need to explore possible challenges for the implementation of such services in the rapidly evolving field of oncology. The aim of our study is to explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on VEMAs in the oncology community in Egypt. It focused on the evaluation of current attitudes, satisfaction and expectations of Egyptian oncologists during and beyond the COVID-19 era. The study is a cross-sectional study using a survey that was distributed through social media. It targeted Egyptian oncologists during the months of May and June 2020. A total of 118 participants completed the survey and most of them were younger than 35 years (71%). Most participants (93.2%) agreed that COVID-19 affected the stream of live medical educational meetings. About three-quarters of them attended VEMAs during the COVID-19 period compared to 50% prior to the pandemic. The majority reported that evening hours after 8 PM was the best time to attend VEMAs and 1 hour is the optimal duration for a virtual meeting. Although the COVID-19 pandemic appeared as an unprecedented challenge for medical education, it can be a catalyst for VEMAs, especially in a rapidly evolving field such as oncology. Further research is needed to assess whether learners are ready and willing to make greater use of online educational platforms and investigate the possible barriers and strategies to enhance their use.

4.
Blood ; 136(Supplement 1):21-21, 2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1339047

ABSTRACT

BackgroundCOVID-19 pandemic disrupted heath care system all around the world and overwhelmed the capacity of hospital to manage regular patients including cancer patients. We implemented a new program to help managing oncology patients visited our Emergency Rooms (ER) and discharged home.MethodsOur home care program designed to cover all aspects of patients care while they are at home by checking the ER list on daily basis and identify all oncology patients on this list. We developed an algorithm, to follow up our patients and the COVID-19 test status and to act accordingly (figure 1). The team consists of oncologist, oncology nurse specialists, patient educator and data management person. The primary oncologist of each patient is notified and consulted on the plan. The team follows the result and decide further steps of management accordingly. The intervention includes regular clinical assessment by calling the patient, arranging medication delivery, sending patients brochures explaining the necessary protective measured needs to be taken by patient and care givers and respond to patient and family queries and concerns.ResultsBetween May 31 and July 31, 237 oncology patients seen in ED with different clinical presentations. One hundred forty two patients did not need admission and therefore discharged home. COVID-19 test was carried out according to the presenting symptoms and ARI score (test requested if score is 4 or more). Only 30 patients (21%) needed COVID-19 testing prior to discharge from ED and 6 patients tested positive. However, on our follow of those patients at home further 16 patients (11%) needed to be tested due to new developments of their symptoms and 3 patients tested positive. The main reasons for nor requesting COVID-19 for some patients either 1) recent testing in outpatient clinics or other health centers outside our institution Ministry of Health, 2) they are known to have covid-19 and still in active infection, 3) based on patient`s MRP decision not to swab patient for COVID -19. During our daily monitoring of patients at their homes, 12 patients (8%) were called back due to worsening of their symptoms and needed further assessment and management after discussion with their MRP. As per our infection control department guidelines, repeating COVID-19 testing for asymptomatic patients was not necessary and patient can be discharged from our records. This new model of care in our institution was presented to the COVID-19 pandemic command center and the program got the approval and recommended to be implemented in other departments as per patients need.ConclusionOncology patients are vulnerable especially at this time of COVID-19 pandemic and our program is designed to reduce the risk of exposure and infection by looking after those patient while they are at home in addition to maintain the continuity of their cancer management.Figure

5.
J Infect Public Health ; 14(7): 949-953, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243050

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of COVID-19 infection in cancer patients is critical to co-manage their underlying disease and infection appropriately. Our study aimed at evaluating the sensitivity and specificity of screening patients with cancer for COVID-19 infection. METHODS: All oncology patients receiving care at Department of Oncology at King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh were screened using the acute respiratory infection (ARI) survey. Nasopharyngeal and throat swap for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) was performed on patients who have high ARI score (i.e. ≥ 4), or any patient requiring elective/emergency hospitalization, undergoing a procedure as well as screening asymptomatic patients receiving chemotherapy between April 1st and July 30, 2020. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained. Descriptive and inferential analyses were done and sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were calculated considering the COVID-19 PCR as the gold standard. RESULTS: During the study period, a total of 473 patients were included with a median age was 56 years (14-104), 51% were female, 73% had solid tumors, and 66% received treatment within the last 3 months. These patients underwent 688 PCR tests along with ARI survey screening. Testing was done in the outpatient, inpatient, and emergency department setting in 41%, 40% and 19% of the patients, respectively. Majority of tests were screening of asymptomatic patients and only 23% were tested for suspected infections with ARI ≥ 4. A total of 54 patients (8%) had positive PCR for COVID-19 infection. The prevalence of infection varied from month to month ranging from 1.09% in April up to 19.70% in June and correlated with the average daily and active case load at a national level. The diagnostic yield of the ARI score also correlated with infection burden nationally. The PPV and NPV of the ARI as a screening tool was 18.24% (0-31.8) and 95.6% (86.36-98.86%) with the PPN fluctuating considerably in parallel with the prevalence of COVID-19 result. Similarly, the sensitivity and specificity of the ARI were 55.77% (0-70.59) and 79.4 (69.19-92), respectively. CONCLUSION: The yield of screening asymptomatic patients with cancer varies based on the community burden of COVID-19 infection. As universal screening can cause delays to patient care, it should be tailored based on the individual patient risks and infection burden in the region.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 7: 242-252, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197355

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: As frontline workers facing the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare providers should be well-prepared to fight the disease and prevent harm to their patients and themselves. Our study aimed to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practice of oncologists in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on them. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a validated questionnaire disseminated to oncologists by SurveyMonkey. The tool had 42 questions that captured participants' knowledge, attitude, and practice; their experiences; and the pandemic's impact on various aspects of their lives. Participants from Middle East and North African countries, Brazil, and the Philippines completed the electronic survey between April 24 and May 15, 2020. RESULTS: Of the 1,010 physicians who participated in the study, 54.75% were male and 64.95% were medical or clinical oncologists. The level of knowledge regarding the prevention and transmission of the virus was good in 52% of participants. The majority (92%) were worried about contracting the virus either extremely (30%) or mildly (62%), and 84.85% were worried about transmitting the virus to their families. Approximately 76.93% reported they would take the COVID 19 vaccine once available, with oncologists practicing in Brazil having the highest odds ratio of intention to receive the COVID-19 vaccine (odds ratio, 11.8, 95% CI, 5.96 to 23.38, P < .001). Participants reported a negative impact of the pandemic on relations with coworkers (15.84%), relations with family (27.84%), their emotional and mental well-being (48.51%), research productivity (34.26%), and financial income (52.28%). CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has adverse effects on various personal and professional aspects of oncologists' lives. Interventions should be implemented to mitigate the negative impact and prepare oncologists to manage future crises with more efficiency and resilience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Oncologists/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Africa, Northern , Brazil , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Middle East , Oncologists/economics , Oncologists/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Philippines , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
7.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 6: 1428-1438, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1088630

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic affected health care systems globally and resulted in the interruption of usual care in many health care facilities, exposing vulnerable patients with cancer to significant risks. Our study aimed to evaluate the impact of this pandemic on cancer care worldwide. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study using a validated web-based questionnaire of 51 items. The questionnaire obtained information on the capacity and services offered at these centers, magnitude of disruption of care, reasons for disruption, challenges faced, interventions implemented, and the estimation of patient harm during the pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 356 centers from 54 countries across six continents participated between April 21 and May 8, 2020. These centers serve 716,979 new patients with cancer a year. Most of them (88.2%) reported facing challenges in delivering care during the pandemic. Although 55.34% reduced services as part of a preemptive strategy, other common reasons included an overwhelmed system (19.94%), lack of personal protective equipment (19.10%), staff shortage (17.98%), and restricted access to medications (9.83%). Missing at least one cycle of therapy by > 10% of patients was reported in 46.31% of the centers. Participants reported patient exposure to harm from interruption of cancer-specific care (36.52%) and noncancer-related care (39.04%), with some centers estimating that up to 80% of their patients were exposed to harm. CONCLUSION: The detrimental impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer care is widespread, with varying magnitude among centers worldwide. Additional research to assess this impact at the patient level is required.


Subject(s)
Cancer Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Cancer Care Facilities/standards , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Global Burden of Disease , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Humans , Infection Control/standards , International Cooperation , Medical Oncology/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data
8.
Crit Rev Oncol Hematol ; 156: 103120, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-887065

ABSTRACT

Treatment of patients with lung cancer during the current COVID-19 pandemic is challenging. Lung cancer is a heterogenous disease with a wide variety of therapeutic options. Oncologists have to determine the risks and benefits of modifying the treatment plans of patients especially in situation where the disease biology and treatment are complex. Health care visits carry a risk of transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and the similarities of COVID-19 symptoms and lung cancer manifestations represent a dominant problem. Efforts to modify treatment of lung cancer during the current pandemic have been adapted by many healthcare institutes to reduce exposure of lung cancer patients to SARS-CoV-2. We summarized the implications of COVID-19 pandemic on the management of lung cancer from the perspective of different specialties of thoracic oncology multidisciplinary team.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Lung Neoplasms , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Ecancermedicalscience ; 14: 1076, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-820242

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to disrupt many healthcare settings worldwide including cancer care. COVID-19 has been associated with worse outcomes amongst cancer patients. Saudi Arabia has experienced several Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) outbreaks that affected the continuity of cancer care. In this paper, we describe how Saudi Arabia responded to COVID-19, how cancer care was re-restructured during this pandemic and how the recent MERS-CoV experience may have improved the Saudi response to COVID-19.

10.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 6: 1461-1471, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807637

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the ASCO launched a Global Webinar Series to address various aspects of cancer care during the pandemic. Here we present the lessons learned and recommendations that have emerged from these webinars. METHODS: Fifteen international health care experts from different global regions and oncology disciplines participated in one of the six 1-hour webinars to discuss the latest data, share their experiences, and provide recommendations to manage cancer care during the COVID-19 pandemic. These sessions include didactic presentations followed by a moderated discussion and questions from the audience. All recommendations have been transcribed, categorized, and reviewed by the experts, who have also approved the consensus recommendations. RESULTS: The summary recommendations are divided into different categories, including risk minimization; care prioritization of patients; health care team management; virtual care; management of patients with cancer undergoing surgical, radiation, and systemic therapy; clinical research; and recovery plans. The recommendations emphasize the protection of patients and health care teams from infections, delivery of timely and appropriate care, reduction of harm from the interruption of care, and preparation to handle a surge of new COVID-19 cases, complications, or comorbidities thereof. CONCLUSION: The recommendations from the ASCO Global Webinar Series may guide practicing oncologists to manage their patients during the ongoing pandemic and help organizations recover from the crisis. Implementation of these recommendations may improve understanding of how COVID-19 has affected cancer care and increase readiness to manage the current and any future outbreaks effectively.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Global Health , Medical Oncology/standards , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/standards , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Medical Oncology/trends , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/immunology , Oncologists/organization & administration , Oncologists/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/trends
11.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 7: 429, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-719738
12.
Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk ; 21(1): e66-e75, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-718689

ABSTRACT

Histiocytic disorders are an exceptionally rare group of diseases with diverse manifestations and a paucity of approved treatments, thereby leading to various challenges in their diagnosis and management. With the discovery of novel molecular targets and the incorporation of targeted agents in the management of various adult histiocytic disorders, their management has become increasingly complex. In an attempt to improve the understanding of the clinical features and management of common adult histiocytic disorders (Langerhans cell histiocytosis, Erdheim-Chester disease, Rosai-Dorfman disease, and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis), we created this document based on existing literature and expert opinion.


Subject(s)
Erdheim-Chester Disease/drug therapy , Histiocytosis, Langerhans-Cell/drug therapy , Histiocytosis, Sinus/drug therapy , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/drug therapy , Adult , Drug Therapy, Combination , Erdheim-Chester Disease/diagnosis , Histiocytosis, Langerhans-Cell/diagnosis , Histiocytosis, Sinus/diagnosis , Humans , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/diagnosis , Treatment Outcome
13.
Patient Prefer Adherence ; 14: 1205-1212, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-685217

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During curfew, patients are self-isolated at home and worried. Patient-doctor interactions may be disrupted and therefore need to be replaced by alternative effective communication methods. PURPOSE: To describe the preferences of cancer patients with respect to communication methods and the use of patient-accessible electronic health records (PAEHRs). To record the impact on cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic and the knowledge and attitude of the patients towards it. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We created a self-administered electronic survey that was piloted and evaluated for its clinical relevance. Using convenient sampling methods, we surveyed the cancer patients in our Oncology Center. RESULTS: We received 385 responses between April 15 and April 30, 2020. The preferred method for communication was a phone call with a 92% response rate followed by the electronic patient portal, mobile application, telemedicine and text message in 75%, 76%, 73%, and 72%, respectively. The majority (97%) preferred the use of PAEHRs for appointments, 95% for drug delivery and to view laboratory tests, and 92% in requesting medical reports. In our survey, 22% of patients with cancer reported that their medical cancer care had not been affected by COVID-19. They reported that trusted sources of information during COVID-19 included the Ministry of Health with 98% and doctors with 94%. Sixty-one percent know that they are more susceptible to COVID-19 infection and 91% of respondents supported the notion of digital transformation in the caring of cancer patients. CONCLUSION: Our study revealed a general acceptance of patients to telecommunication as substitute to in-person interaction with their physicians. Interaction between cancer patients and health care providers should not be disrupted but should be augmented with more effective platforms to improve health care outcomes.

14.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(6): e19691, 2020 06 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-612381

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, patients with cancer in rural settings and distant geographical areas will be affected the most by curfews. Virtual management (telemedicine) has been shown to reduce health costs and improve access to care. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this survey is to understand oncologists' awareness of and views on virtual management, challenges, and preferences, as well as their priorities regarding the prescribing of anticancer treatments during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We created a self-administrated electronic survey about the virtual management of patients with cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic. We evaluated its clinical sensibility and pilot tested the instrument. We surveyed practicing oncologists in Gulf and Arab countries using snowball sampling via emails and social media networks. Reminders were sent 1 and 2 weeks later using SurveyMonkey. RESULTS: We received 222 responses from validated oncologists from April 2-22, 2020. An awareness of virtual clinics, virtual multidisciplinary teams, and virtual prescriptions was reported by 182 (82%), 175 (79%), and 166 (75%) respondents, respectively. Reported challenges associated with virtual management were the lack of physical exam (n=134, 60%), patients' awareness and access (n=131, 59%), the lack of physical attendance of patients (n=93, 42%), information technology (IT) support (n=82, 37%), and the safety of virtual management (n=78, 35%). Overall, 111 (50%) and 107 (48%) oncologists did not prefer the virtual prescription of chemotherapy and novel immunotherapy, respectively. However, 188 (85%), 165 (74%), and 127 (57%) oncologists preferred the virtual prescription of hormonal therapy, bone modifying agents, and targeted therapy, respectively. In total, 184 (83%), 183 (83%), and 176 (80%) oncologists preferred to continue neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and perioperative treatments, respectively. Overall, 118 (53%) respondents preferred to continue first-line palliative treatment, in contrast to 68 (30%) and 47 (21%) respondents indicating a preference to interrupt second- and third-line palliative treatment, respectively. For administration of virtual prescriptions, all respondents preferred the oral route and 118 (53%) preferred the subcutaneous route. In contrast, 193 (87%) did not prefer the intravenous route for virtual prescriptions. Overall, 102 (46%) oncologists responded that they would "definitely" prefer to manage patients with cancer virtually. CONCLUSIONS: Oncologists have a high level of awareness of virtual management. Although their survey responses indicated that second- and third-line palliative treatments should be interrupted, they stated that neoadjuvant, adjuvant, perioperative, and first-line palliative treatments should continue. Our results confirm that oncologists' views on the priority of anticancer treatments are consistent with the evolving literature during the COVID-19 pandemic. Challenges to virtual management should be addressed to improve the care of patients with cancer.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Care Surveys , Neoplasms/therapy , Oncologists , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19 , Female , Health Care Costs , Humans , Internet , Male , Neoplasms/economics , Pandemics , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/economics , Telemedicine/economics
15.
J Thorac Oncol ; 15(7): 1119-1136, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-478255

ABSTRACT

The global coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic continues to escalate at a rapid pace inundating medical facilities and creating substantial challenges globally. The risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in patients with cancer seems to be higher, especially as they are more likely to present with an immunocompromised condition, either from cancer itself or from the treatments they receive. A major consideration in the delivery of cancer care during the pandemic is to balance the risk of patient exposure and infection with the need to provide effective cancer treatment. Many aspects of the SARS-CoV-2 infection currently remain poorly characterized and even less is known about the course of infection in the context of a patient with cancer. As SARS-CoV-2 is highly contagious, the risk of infection directly affects the cancer patient being treated, other cancer patients in close proximity, and health care providers. Infection at any level for patients or providers can cause considerable disruption to even the most effective treatment plans. Lung cancer patients, especially those with reduced lung function and cardiopulmonary comorbidities are more likely to have increased risk and mortality from coronavirus disease 2019 as one of its common manifestations is as an acute respiratory illness. The purpose of this manuscript is to present a practical multidisciplinary and international overview to assist in treatment for lung cancer patients during this pandemic, with the caveat that evidence is lacking in many areas. It is expected that firmer recommendations can be developed as more evidence becomes available.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Infection Control/organization & administration , Lung Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Patient Care Management , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Interdisciplinary Communication , International Cooperation , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care Management/methods , Patient Care Management/organization & administration , Patient Care Management/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2
16.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 6: 518-524, 2020 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-18719

ABSTRACT

Outbreaks of infectious etiology, particularly those caused by a novel virus that has no known treatment or vaccine, may result in the interruption of medical care provided to patients with cancer and put them at risk for undertreatment in addition to the risk of being exposed to infection, a life-threatening event among patients with cancer. This article describes the approach used to manage patients with cancer during a large-scale Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus hospital outbreak in Saudi Arabia to ensure continuity of care and minimize harm from treatment interruption or acquiring infection. The approach taken toward managing this high-risk situation (COVID-19) could be easily adopted by health care organizations and would be helpful to ensure readiness for the occurrence of future outbreaks of different infectious etiologies like those recent episodes of new coronavirus.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Continuity of Patient Care , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
17.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 6: 471-475, 2020 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-11409

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study investigated the features of oncology patients with confirmed Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) at the Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs-Riyadh during the outbreak of June 2015 to determine the clinical course and outcome of affected patients. METHODS: The patients' demographic information, cancer history, treatment pattern, information about MERS-coronavirus (CoV) infection, history of travel, clinical symptoms, test results, and outcome were collected and analyzed as part of a quality improvement project to improve the care and safety of our patients. Only patients with confirmed infection were included. RESULTS: A total of 19 patients were identified, with a median age of 66 years (range, 16-88 years), and 12 patients (63%) were males. The most common underlying disease was hematologic malignancies (47.4%), followed by colorectal cancer (21%) and lung cancer (15.8%). Hypertension and diabetes mellitus were the most common comorbidities (57.9% and 52.6%, respectively). Infection was diagnosed by nasopharyngeal swab in all patients. All patients contracted the infection during their hospitalization for other reasons. Sixteen patients (80%) were admitted to the intensive care unit; 13 patients (81%) had acute respiratory distress syndrome, 11 were intubated (68.75%), 9 had acute renal injury (56.25%), and 3 required dialysis (18.75%). Only 3 patients (15.8%) with early-stage cancers survived. Patients with hematologic malignancies and advanced solid tumors had a 100% case fatality rate. The majority of the causes of death were due to multi-organ failure and septic shock. CONCLUSION: MERS-CoV infection resulted in a high case fatality rate in patients with malignancy. Therefore, it is critical to implement effective primary preventive measures to avoid exposure of patients with cancer to the virus.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Neoplasms/virology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/mortality , Renal Dialysis , Retrospective Studies , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Travel , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
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