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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 07 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1969223

ABSTRACT

Nursing staff who are competent to use personal protective equipment (PPE) correctly can protect themselves while providing safe, high-quality care to patients. Under pandemic conditions, the ability to wear PPE correctly is essential in clinical practice, but the acquisition of correct PPE-wearing procedures is difficult for most staff in the absence of live practice drills. This study aimed to test the mobile video online learning approach by integrating PPE contexts into a digital learning system. We conducted an experiment to verify whether the mobile video online learning approach could effectively improve nursing staff's learning achievement, learning anxiety, critical thinking skills, and learning self-efficacy. The study used a quasi-experimental design and was conducted with 47 nursing staff, divided into one group using a mobile video online learning approach and one group with a conventional learning approach. We used pre-and post-test examinations of learning achievements, learning anxiety, critical thinking, and learning self-efficacy. Results showed a significant effect of using the mobile video online learning method in helping nursing staff to decrease learning anxiety and improve knowledge about COVID-19 protection, increase learning achievement, critical thinking skills, and learning self-efficacy. These benefits are of interest to nursing workplace managers wishing to maintain professional standards during epidemics by improving the nursing staff's PPE knowledge and self-efficacy concerning PPE.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Nursing Staff , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment
2.
J Glob Health ; 12: 05028, 2022 Jul 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1964527

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has been shown to cause enormous psychological burden among health care workers, including first responders. However, psychological well-being of first responders, essential in the fight against COVID-19 pandemic, has often been ignored. We performed the first meta-analysis to explore the prevalence of 1) depression, 2) anxiety, and 3) stress among first responders for medical emergencies during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A comprehensive search was conducted in Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science, PsychInfo, PubMed, and the WHO COVID-19 database from 2020. The Freeman-Tukey double-arcsine transformation model in R-software determined the pooled prevalence and Comprehensive Meta-Analysis for associated factors of depression, anxiety, and stress with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). The Cochrane Q, τ2, and I2 statistics were used to examine heterogeneity. Sub-group analysis was conducted to identify moderator variables. Results: We identified 765 records, from which 17 studies were included with 8096 first responders. The pooled prevalence was 31% (95% CI = 21%-41%) for depression; 67% (95% CI = 64%-70%) for mild depression, 24% (95% CI = 17%-31%) for moderate depression, and 16% (95% CI = 4%-34%) for severe depression. The pooled prevalence for anxiety was 32% (95% CI = 20%-44%); 60% (95% CI = 46%-73%) for mild anxiety, 27% (95% CI = 14%-42%) for moderate anxiety, and 14% (95% CI = 7%-22%) for severe anxiety. The pooled prevalence for stress was 17% (95% CI = 4%-34%); 58% (95% CI = 38%-77%) for mild stress, 22% (95% CI = 5%-44%) for moderate stress, and 19% (95% CI = 5%-37%) for severe stress. The prevalence of depression was 37% (95% CI = 25%-52%) for paramedics, 28% (95% CI = 12%-54%) for EMS personnel and 22% (95% CI = 13%-33%) for police. Similarly, the prevalence of anxiety was 38% (95% CI = 20%-60%) for paramedics, 28% (95% CI = 11%-53%) for EMS personnel, and 19% (95% CI = 10%-32%) for police. Married responders were likely at risk for depression (1.50, 95% CI = 1.26-1.78) and anxiety (1.94, 95% CI = 1.62-2.33), while unmarried responders were less likely at risk for depression (0.67, 95% CI = 0.56-0.79) and anxiety (0.50, 95% CI = 0.43-0.63). Conclusions: High prevalence of depression, anxiety, and stress during the COVID-19 pandemic among first responders for medical emergencies emphasizes the need for monitoring their psychological well-being. Early assessment and management of mild depression, anxiety, and stress among first responders are crucial in preventing progression into moderate and severe types.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Responders , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Emergencies , Humans , Pandemics , Prevalence , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
3.
Intensive Crit Care Nurs ; 72: 103257, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783407

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine the effectiveness of prone positioning on COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome with moderating factors in both traditional prone positioning (invasive mechanical ventilation) and awake self-prone positioning patients (non-invasive ventilation). RESEARCH METHODOLOGY: A comprehensive search was conducted in CINAHL, Cochrane library, Embase, Medline-OVID, NCBI SARS-CoV-2 Resources, ProQuest, Scopus, and Web of Science without language restrictions. All studies with prospective and experimental designs evaluating the effect of prone position patients with COVID-19 related to acute respiratory distress syndrome were included. Pooled standardised mean differences were calculated after prone position for primary (PaO2/FiO2) and secondary outcomes (SpO2 and PaO2) RESULTS: A total of 15 articles were eligible and included in the final analysis. Prone position had a statistically significant effect in improving PaO2/FiO2 with standardised mean difference of 1.10 (95%CI 0.60-1.59), SpO2 with standardised mean difference of 3.39 (95% CI 1.30-5.48), and PaO2 with standardised mean difference of 0.77 (95% CI 0.19-1.35). Patients with higher body mass index and longer duration/day are associated with larger standardised mean difference effect sizes for prone positioning. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that prone position significantly improved oxygen saturation in COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome in both traditional prone positioning and awake self-prone positioning patients. Prone position should be recommended for patients with higher body mass index and longer durations to obtain the maximum effect.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Duration of Therapy , Humans , Obesity , Prone Position , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Int J Nurs Stud ; 126: 104136, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575989

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively impacted the psychological well-being of individuals and society. Previous studies conducted on coronavirus outbreaks including Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome pandemic found that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and anxiety were the most common mental health problems and long-term consequences of these outbreaks. Currently, comprehensive and integrated information on the global prevalence of PTSD due to the COVID-19 pandemic is lacking. OBJECTIVE: In the present meta-analysis, we examined the global prevalence and associated risk factors of PTSD in patients/survivors of COVID-19, health professionals, and the population at large. DESIGN: Meta-analysis. DATA SOURCE: Cochrane, CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and manual search up to June 2021. METHODS: We included studies evaluating the prevalence of PTSD during the COVID-19 pandemic in either patients/survivors, health professionals, and the population at large. The data were analyzed using logit transformation with the random-effects model. Risk of bias assessment was conducted using Hoy and colleagues. RESULTS: A total of 63 studies (n = 124,952) from 24 different countries were involved. The overall pooled estimate of PTSD prevalence was 17.52% (95% CI 13.89 to 21.86), with no evidence of publication bias (t=-0.22, p-value=0.83). This study found a high prevalence of PTSD among patients with COVID-19 (15.45%; 95% CI 10.59 to 21.99), health professionals (17.23%; 95% CI 11.78 to 24.50), and the population at large (17.34%; 95% CI 12.21 to 24.03). Subgroup analyses showed that those working in COVID-19 units (30.98%; 95% CI, 16.85 to 49.86), nurses (28.22%; 95% CI, 15.83 to 45.10), those living in European countries (25.05%; 95% CI 19.14 to 32.06), and studies that used Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-5 (30.18%, 95% CI 25.78 to 34.98) demonstrated to have the highest PTSD prevalence compared to other subgroups. Meta-regression analyses revealed that the elderly (above age 65) had lower PTSD prevalence (-1.75, 95% CI -3.16 to -0.34) than the adult population. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS: Substantial PTSD prevalence was found in patients with COVID-19, health professionals, and the population at large. Moderator analysis revealed that age, unit of work, health profession, continent, and assessment tools as significant moderators. Mental health services are needed for everyone, especially adults under the age of 65, those who work in COVID-19 units, nurses, and people in the European continent. REGISTRATION: The study protocol was registered with the International database of prospective registered systematic reviews (PROSPERO): CRD42020218762. Tweetable abstract: The pooled PTSD prevalence during COVID-19 pandemic for patients with COVID-19, health professionals, and the population at large was 17.52%.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , Aged , Humans , Pandemics , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
5.
Aust Crit Care ; 34(2): 182-190, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-947115

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since coronavirus disease 2019 was first discovered, at the time of writing this article, the number of people infected globally has exceeded 1 million. Its high transmission rate has resulted in nosocomial infections in healthcare facilities all over the world. Nursing personnel account for nearly 50% of the global health workforce and are the primary provider of direct care in hospitals and long-term care facilities. Nurses stand on the front line against the spread of this pandemic, and proper protection procedures are vital. OBJECTIVES: The present study aims to share the procedures and measures used by Taiwan nursing personnel to help reduce global transmission. REVIEW METHODS: Compared with other regions, where large-scale epidemics have overwhelmed the health systems, Taiwan has maintained the number of confirmed cases within a manageable scope. A review of various national and international policies and guidelines was carried out to present proper procedures and preventions for nursing personnel in healthcare settings. RESULTS: This study shows how Taiwan's health system rapidly identified suspected cases as well as the prevention policies and strategies, key protection points for nursing personnel in implementing high-risk nursing tasks, and lessons from a nursing perspective. CONCLUSIONS: Various world media have affirmed the rapid response and effective epidemic prevention strategies of Taiwan's health system. Educating nurses on procedures for infection control, reporting cases, and implementing protective measures to prevent nosocomial infections are critical to prevent further outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Nurse's Role , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Taiwan/epidemiology
6.
Int J Ment Health Nurs ; 30(1): 102-116, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-892267

ABSTRACT

A large-scale survey study was conducted to assess trauma, burnout, posttraumatic growth, and associated factors for nurses in the COVID-19 pandemic. The Trauma Screening Questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and Posttraumatic Growth Inventory-Short Form were utilized. Factors associated with trauma, burnout, and posttraumatic growth were analysed using logistic and multiple regressions. In total, 12 596 completed the survey, and 52.3% worked in COVID-19 designated hospitals. At the survey's conclusion in April, 13.3% reported trauma (Trauma ≥ 6), there were moderate degrees of emotional exhaustion, and 4,949 (39.3%) experienced posttraumatic growth. Traumatic response and emotional exhaustion were greater among (i) women (odds ratio [OR]: 1.48, 95% CI 1.12-1.97 P = 0.006; emotional exhaustion OR: 1.30, 95% CI 1.09-1.54, P = 0.003), (ii) critical care units (OR: 1.20, 95% CI 1.06-1.35, P = 0.004; emotional exhaustion OR: 1.23, 95% CI 1.12-1.33, P < 0.001) (iii) COVID-19 designated hospital (OR: 1.24, 95% CI 1.11-1.38; P < 0.001; emotional exhaustion OR: 1.26, 95% CI 1.17-1.36; P < 0.001) and (iv) COVID-19-related departments (OR: 1.16, 95% CI 1.04-1.29, P = 0.006, emotional exhaustion only). To date, this is the first large-scale study to report the rates of trauma and burnout for nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study indicates that nurses who identified as women, working in ICUs, COVID-19 designated hospitals, and departments involved with treating COVID-19 patients had higher scores in mental health outcomes. Future research can focus on the factors the study has identified that could lead to more effective prevention and treatment strategies for adverse health outcomes and better use of resources to promote positive outcomes.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/nursing , Adult , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Critical Care Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Personality Inventory , Sex Factors , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Taiwan
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