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1.
Acta Pharmacol Sin ; 2021 Dec 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565710
2.
Biomed Environ Sci ; 34(9): 743-749, 2021 Sep 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1417232

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to estimate the seroprevalence of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and G (IgG) antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in asymptomatic people in Wuhan. This was a cross-sectional study, which enrolled 18,712 asymptomatic participants from 154 work units in Wuhan. Pearson Chi-square test, t-test, and Mann-Whitney test were used to compare the standardized seroprevalence of IgG and IgM for age and gender between different groups. The results indicated the standardized seroprevalence of IgG and IgM showed a downward trend and was significantly higher among females than males. Besides, different geographic areas and workplaces had different seroprevalence of IgG among asymptomatic people, and the number of abnormalities in CT imaging were higher in IgG antibody-positive cases than IgG-negative cases. We hope these findings can provide references for herd immunity investigation and provide basis for vaccine development.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carrier State/epidemiology , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/immunology , Carrier State/immunology , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupations/classification , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Young Adult
4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 691249, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241171

ABSTRACT

Background: Dynamic D-dimer level is a key biomarker for the severity and mortality of COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019). How aberrant fibrinolysis influences the clinical progression of COVID-19 presents a clinicopathological dilemma challenging intensivists. Methods: We performed meta-analysis and meta regression to analyze the associations of plasma D-dimer with 106 clinical variables to identify a panoramic view of the derangements of fibrinolysis in 14,862 patients of 42 studies. There were no limitations of age, gender, race, and country. Raw data of each group were extracted separately by two investigators. Individual data of case series, median and interquartile range, and ranges of median or mean were converted to SDM (standard deviation of mean). Findings: The weighted mean difference of D-dimer was 0.97 µg/mL (95% CI 0.65, 1.29) between mild and severe groups, as shown by meta-analysis. Publication bias was significant. Meta-regression identified 58 of 106 clinical variables were associated with plasma D-dimer levels. Of these, 11 readouts were negatively related to the level of plasma D-dimer. Further, age and gender were confounding factors. There were 22 variables independently correlated with the D-dimer level, including respiratory rate, dyspnea plasma K+, glucose, SpO2, BUN (blood urea nitrogen), bilirubin, ALT (alanine aminotransferase), AST (aspartate aminotransferase), systolic blood pressure, and CK (creatine kinase). Interpretation: These findings support elevated D-dimer as an independent predictor for both mortality and complications. The identified D-dimer-associated clinical variables draw a landscape integrating the aggregate effects of systemically suppressive and pulmonary hyperactive derangements of fibrinolysis, and the D-dimer-associated clinical biomarkers, and conceptually parameters could be combined for risk stratification, potentially for tracking thrombolytic therapy or alternative interventions.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Diagnostic Tests, Routine , Disease Progression , Humans , Patient Admission , Severity of Illness Index
6.
World J Stem Cells ; 12(6): 471-480, 2020 Jun 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-719804

ABSTRACT

Respiratory diseases, including coronavirus disease 2019 and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are leading causes of global fatality. There are no effective and curative treatments, but supportive care only. Cell therapy is a promising therapeutic strategy for refractory and unmanageable pulmonary illnesses, as proved by accumulating preclinical studies. Stem cells consist of totipotent, pluripotent, multipotent, and unipotent cells with the potential to differentiate into cell types requested for repair. Mesenchymal stromal cells, endothelial progenitor cells, peripheral blood stem cells, and lung progenitor cells have been applied to clinical trials. To date, the safety and feasibility of stem cell and extracellular vesicles administration have been confirmed by numerous phase I/II trials in patients with COPD, acute respiratory distress syndrome, bronchial dysplasia, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary artery hypertension, and silicosis. Five routes and a series of doses have been tested for tolerance and advantages of different regimes. In this review, we systematically summarize the global trends for the cell therapy of common airway and lung diseases registered for clinical trials. The future directions for both new clinical trials and preclinical studies are discussed.

7.
Physiol Rev ; 100(3): 1065-1075, 2020 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-17758

ABSTRACT

Patients with hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular illness, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and kidney dysfunction have worse clinical outcomes when infected with SARS-CoV-2, for unknown reasons. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence for the existence of elevated plasmin(ogen) in COVID-19 patients with these comorbid conditions. Plasmin, and other proteases, may cleave a newly inserted furin site in the S protein of SARS-CoV-2, extracellularly, which increases its infectivity and virulence. Hyperfibrinolysis associated with plasmin leads to elevated D-dimer in severe patients. The plasmin(ogen) system may prove a promising therapeutic target for combating COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/blood , Disease Susceptibility/blood , Fibrinolysin/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions/physiology , Plasminogen/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
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