Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
1.
J Evid Based Med ; 2021 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462829

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has turned into a pandemic and resulted in huge death tolls and burdens. Integrating Chinese and western medicine has played an important role in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. PURPOSE: We aimed to develop a living evidence-based guideline of integrating Chinese and western medicine for COVID-19. STUDY DESIGN: Living evidence-based guideline. METHODS: This living guideline was developed using internationally recognized and accepted guideline standards, dynamically monitoring the release of new clinical evidence, and quickly updating the linked living systematic review, evidence summary tables, and recommendations. Modified Delphi method was used to reach consensus for all recommendations. The certainty of the evidence, resources, and other factors were fully considered, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was used to rate the certainty of evidence and the strength of recommendations. RESULTS: The first version of this living guidance focuses on patients who are mild or moderate COVID-19. A multidisciplinary guideline development panel was established. Ten clinical questions were identified based on the status of evidence and a face-to-face experts' consensus. Finally, nine recommendations were reached consensus, and were formulated from systematic reviews of the benefits and harms, certainty of evidence, public accessibility, policy supports, feedback on proposed recommendations from multidisciplinary experts, and consensus meetings. CONCLUSION: This guideline panel made nine recommendations, which covered five traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescription granules/decoction (MXXFJD, QFPD, XFBD, TJQW, and JWDY), three Chinese patent medicines (LHQW granules/capsule, JHQG granules, and LHQK granules), and one Chinese herbal injection (XBJ injection). Of them, two were strongly recommended (LHQW granules/capsule and QFPD decoction), and five were weakly recommended (MXXFJD decoction, XFBD decoction, JHQG granules, TJQW granules, and JWDY decoction) for the treatment of mild and moderate COVID-19; two were weakly recommended against (XBJ injection and LHQK granules) the treatment of mild and moderate COVID-19. The users of this living guideline are most likely to be clinicians, patients, governments, ministries, and health administrators.

2.
Disease Surveillance ; 36(6):573-580, 2021.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1395019

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze the early clinical characteristics of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases in different age groups, and provide references for the early identification, treatment and management of COVID-19 cases, prevention of the progression of illness and further effective prevention and control of COVID-19.

3.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 12(19): 18822-18832, 2020 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-836444

ABSTRACT

In this study, we established a simple and practical tool for early identification of potentially high-risk individuals among elderly COVID-19 patients. Included were 2106 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 patients aged 60 years and above in 30 provinces of mainland China. Using discrimination (the area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve [AUC]) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test and calibration plots), a nomogram for predicting critically ill cases was developed, and its performance was examined using an internal validation cohort (444 patients) and external cohort (770 patients). The proportion of critically ill patients was 11.8% (248/2106). The most common symptoms at the onset of illness were fever (66.6%), cough (34.1%), fatigue (23.3%), and expectoration (23.6%). Older age, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, fever, fatigue, shortness of breath, and lymphocyte percentage lower than 20% at admission were associated with increased risk of becoming critically ill. The AUCs for the six-variable-based nomogram were 0.77 (95% CI: 0.73-0.82), 0.73 (95% CI: 0.67-0.79), and 0.77 (95% CI: 0.71-0.83) in the development, internal validation, and external validation cohorts, respectively. This six-variable-based nomogram could potentially serve as a practical and reliable tool for early identification of elderly COVID-19 patients at high risk of becoming critically ill.

4.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-627

ABSTRACT

Background: The sudden epidemic of COVID-19 in China caused attention globally. Health staff are in heavy workload and at high-risk infection. The aims of this

6.
Front Med ; 15(1): 139-143, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597942

ABSTRACT

The rationale for the antibiotic treatment of viral community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults was analyzed to develop a clinical reference standard for this condition. Clinical data from 166 patients diagnosed with viral pneumonia across 14 hospitals in Beijing from November 2010 to December 2017 were collected. The indications for medications were evaluated, and the rationale for the use of antibiotics was analyzed. A total of 163 (98.3%) patients with viral pneumonia were treated with antibiotics. A combination of C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) was used as markers to analyze the possible indications for antibiotic use. With threshold levels set at 0.25 µg/L for PCT and 20 mg/L for CRP, the rate of unreasonable use of antibiotics was 55.2%. By contrast, at a CRP level threshold of 60 mg/L, the rate of antibiotic misuse was 77.3%. A total of 39 of the 163 (23.9%) patients did not meet the guidelines for drug selection for viral CAP in adults. The unreasonable use of antibacterial drugs for the treatment of viral CAP in adults is a serious concern. Clinicians must reduce the unnecessary use of antibiotics.


Subject(s)
Community-Acquired Infections , Pneumonia , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Biomarkers , Calcitonin , Community-Acquired Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Protein Precursors
7.
J Inflamm (Lond) ; 17: 19, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260363

ABSTRACT

Background: To investigate the efficacy and safety of aerosol inhalation of recombinant human interferon α1b (IFNα1b) injection for noninfluenza viral pneumonia. Methods: One hundred sixty-four patients with noninfluenza viral pneumonia were divided into IFNα1b and control groups. The IFNα1b group received routine treatment + aerosol inhalation of recombinant human IFNα1b injection (50 µg × 2 injections, bid). The control group received routine treatment + IFN analog (two injections, bid). Overall response rate (ORR) of five kinds clinical symptoms. Further outcomes were daily average score and the response rate of each of the symptoms above. Results: A total of 163 patients were included in the full analysis set (FAS) and 151 patients were included in the per-protocol set (PPS). After 7 days of treatment, ORR of clinical symptoms was higher in IFNα1b group than that in control group for both the FAS and PPS. Moreover, after 7 days of treatment, the daily score of three efficacy indexes including expectoration, respiratory rate, and pulmonary rales were improved. The ORRs for expectoration and pulmonary rales were higher in the IFNα1b group than in the control group (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences of the ORRs for coughing, chest pain and respiratory rate between the two groups (P > 0.05). The incidence of adverse events was 6.5% (n = 5) in IFNα1b group and 3.5% (n = 3) in control group (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Aerosol inhalation of recombinant human IFNα1b is safe and it can improve the clinical symptoms of noninfluenza viral pneumonia.

9.
Lancet ; 395(10223): 497-506, 2020 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-34

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A recent cluster of pneumonia cases in Wuhan, China, was caused by a novel betacoronavirus, the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV). We report the epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, and radiological characteristics and treatment and clinical outcomes of these patients. METHODS: All patients with suspected 2019-nCoV were admitted to a designated hospital in Wuhan. We prospectively collected and analysed data on patients with laboratory-confirmed 2019-nCoV infection by real-time RT-PCR and next-generation sequencing. Data were obtained with standardised data collection forms shared by WHO and the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium from electronic medical records. Researchers also directly communicated with patients or their families to ascertain epidemiological and symptom data. Outcomes were also compared between patients who had been admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and those who had not. FINDINGS: By Jan 2, 2020, 41 admitted hospital patients had been identified as having laboratory-confirmed 2019-nCoV infection. Most of the infected patients were men (30 [73%] of 41); less than half had underlying diseases (13 [32%]), including diabetes (eight [20%]), hypertension (six [15%]), and cardiovascular disease (six [15%]). Median age was 49·0 years (IQR 41·0-58·0). 27 (66%) of 41 patients had been exposed to Huanan seafood market. One family cluster was found. Common symptoms at onset of illness were fever (40 [98%] of 41 patients), cough (31 [76%]), and myalgia or fatigue (18 [44%]); less common symptoms were sputum production (11 [28%] of 39), headache (three [8%] of 38), haemoptysis (two [5%] of 39), and diarrhoea (one [3%] of 38). Dyspnoea developed in 22 (55%) of 40 patients (median time from illness onset to dyspnoea 8·0 days [IQR 5·0-13·0]). 26 (63%) of 41 patients had lymphopenia. All 41 patients had pneumonia with abnormal findings on chest CT. Complications included acute respiratory distress syndrome (12 [29%]), RNAaemia (six [15%]), acute cardiac injury (five [12%]) and secondary infection (four [10%]). 13 (32%) patients were admitted to an ICU and six (15%) died. Compared with non-ICU patients, ICU patients had higher plasma levels of IL2, IL7, IL10, GSCF, IP10, MCP1, MIP1A, and TNFα. INTERPRETATION: The 2019-nCoV infection caused clusters of severe respiratory illness similar to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and was associated with ICU admission and high mortality. Major gaps in our knowledge of the origin, epidemiology, duration of human transmission, and clinical spectrum of disease need fulfilment by future studies. FUNDING: Ministry of Science and Technology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, National Natural Science Foundation of China, and Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Commission.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/virology , Female , Fever/epidemiology , Fever/virology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/epidemiology , Myalgia/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Prognosis , Radiography, Thoracic , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Time Factors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...