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2.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(5): 1147-1156, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784703

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The aim of this study is to investigate the situation and perceptions of nursing directors about emergency nursing staff deployment in designated hospitals during the pandemic of COVID-19 in mainland China. BACKGROUND: The pandemic of COVID-19 has significantly depleted health care resources, leading to increased burden of nursing care and staffing and exacerbating the crisis in health care facilities. Currently, how to effectively plan and schedule nursing staffing in the pandemic still remains unknown. METHODS: From 14 July 2020 to 8 September 2020, 62 nursing directors of designated hospitals in mainland China were invited to participate in a cross-sectional online survey for their perceptions of nursing human-resource allocation during the pandemic of COVID-19. RESULTS: A total of 55 valid questionnaires were collected, showing that 96.36% of the hospitals had emergency nursing organizations and management systems during the pandemic, 96.36% had well-established scheduling principles for nursing human resources and 54.55% of hospitals had human-resource scheduling platforms. All the hospitals had trained emergency nursing staff in infection control (55, 100%), work process (51, 92.73%) and emergency skills (50, 90.91%). Most of the participants were satisfied with the nursing staffing deployments at their institutions (52, 94.55%). However, more than two thirds of them believed that their human-resource deployment plans need further improvements (39, 70.91%). CONCLUSIONS: Most of the designated hospitals investigated had established emergency nursing organizations, and management systems, and related regulations for the epidemic. However, the contents mentioned above still need to be further standardized. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: The surge of patients in the epidemic was considerable challenge for the emergency capacity of hospitals. In the future, we should pay more attention to the following aspects: building emergency nursing staffing platforms, increasing emergency human-resource reserves, establishing reliable communication channels for emergency response teams, improving the rules and regulations of emergency human-resource management, offering more training and drills for emergency-related knowledge and skills and giving more focus on bio-psycho-social wellbeing of nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-306635

ABSTRACT

Background: Real-time surveillance of search behavior on the Internet has achieved accessibility in measuring disease activity. Here, we systematically assessed the associations between Internet search trends of GI symptoms and daily newly confirmed COVID-19 cases at the global and country levels.Methods: Relative search volumes (RSVs) of the terms of GI symptoms were derived from Internet search engines. Time-series analyses with autoregressive integrated moving average models were conducted to fit and forecast the RSVs trends of each GI symptom before and after the COVID-19 outbreak. Generalized additive models were used to quantify the effects of RSVs of GI symptoms on the incidence of COVID-19. In addition, dose-response analyses were applied to estimate the shape of the associations.Findings: The RSVs of GI symptoms could be characterized by seasonal variation and high correlation with symptoms of fever and cough at worldwide and country levels;especially, “diarrhea” and “loss of taste” were abnormally increased during the outbreak period of COVID-19 with elevated point changes of 1.31 and 8 times, respectively. In addition, these symptom terms could effectively predict the COVID-19 outbreak in advance underlying lag correlation at 12 and 5 days, respectively, and with mutual independence as well. The dose-response curves showed a consistent increase in daily COVID-19 risk with increasing search volumes of “diarrhea” and “loss of taste”.Interpretation: Our comprehensive research was the first and largest infodemiological study that revealed the advanced prediction of the COVID-19 outbreak via GI symptom indicators.Funding: None to declare. Declaration of Interest: We declare no competing interests.

4.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-8, 2022 Jan 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1661934

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-related knowledge and practices of cancer patients and to assess their anxiety- and depression-related to COVID-19 during the early surge phase of the pandemic. METHODS: An online questionnaire survey of cancer patients was conducted from February 10-29, 2020. Knowledge and practices related to COVID-19 were assessed using a custom-made questionnaire. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to assess the presence of anxiety and depression, with scores beyond 7 indicating anxiety or depressive disorder. Univariate and multiple linear regression analyses were used to identify the high-risk groups according to the level of knowledge, practices, anxiety, and depression scores. RESULTS: A total of 341 patients were included. The rate of lower level of knowledge and practices was 49.9% and 18.8%, respectively. Education level of junior high school degree or lower showed a significant association with lower knowledge score (ß: -3.503; P < 0.001) and lower practices score (ß: -2.210; P < 0.001) compared to the education level of college degree and above. The prevalence of anxiety and depression among the respondents was 17.6% and 23.2%, respectively. A higher depression score was associated with older age, marital status of the widowed, and lower level of education, knowledge score, and practices score (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Targeted COVID-19-related education interventions are required for cancer patients with a lower level of knowledge to help improve their practices. Interventions are also required to address the anxiety and depression of cancer patients.

5.
BMC Nurs ; 21(1): 23, 2022 Jan 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636867

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Appropriate allocation of nursing staff is key to ensuring efficient nursing in hospitals, and is significantly correlated with patient safety, nursing quality, and nurse job satisfaction. However, there are few studies on nursing workforce allocation in the isolation wards of COVID-19 designated hospitals globally. This study aims to better understand the nursing workforce allocation in the isolation wards of COVID-19 designated hospitals in China, and provide a theoretical basis for efficiently deploying first-line nurses in China and across the world in the future. METHODS: An online survey was conducted among the head nurses (n = 229) and nurses (n = 1378) in the isolation wards of 117 hospitals (selected by stratified sampling), using a self-reported human resource allocation questionnaire. RESULTS: The average bed-to-nurse ratios of different isolation wards were different (Z = 36.742, P = 0.000). The bed-to-nurse ratios of the ICU, suspected COVID-19 cases ward, and confirmed COVID-19 cases ward, were 1:1.88, 1:0.56, and 1:0.45, respectively. The nurse work hours per shift in different isolation wards were also different (Z = 8.468, P = 0.014), with the specific values of the ICU, suspected COVID-19 cases ward, and confirmed COVID-19 cases ward, being 5, 6, and 6 h, respectively. A correlation analysis showed that the average work hours per shift was proportional to the overtime work of nurses (rs = 0.146), the proportion of nurse practitioners was proportional to the overall utilization rate of nursing human resources in the wards (rs = 0.136), and the proportion of nurses with college degrees was proportional to teamwork (rs = 0.142). The proportion of nurses above grade 10 was inversely proportional to teamwork and psychological problems (rs = 0.135, rs = 0.203). The results of multiple stepwise regression analyses showed that the work hours of nurses per shift was the main factor affecting nurse satisfaction and that the proportion of nurses and the work hours of nurses per shift were both independent factors affecting the length of stay (LOS) of patients. CONCLUSION: Hospitals in China have made good nursing workforce allocations during the COVID-19 pandemic, but there are certain shortcomings. Therefore, scientific and efficient nursing workforce allocation practice plans should be established to improve the ability of hospitals to deal with public health emergencies and are urgent problems that need to be addressed soon.

6.
J Infect ; 84(1): 56-63, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510025

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Real-time surveillance of search behavior on the internet has achieved accessibility in measuring disease activity. In this study, we systematically assessed the associations between internet search trends of gastrointestinal (GI) symptom terms and daily newly confirmed COVID-19 cases at both global and regional levels. METHODS: Relative search volumes (RSVs) of GI symptom terms were derived from internet search engines. Time-series analyses with autoregressive integrated moving average models were conducted to fit and forecast the RSV trends of each GI symptom term before and after the COVID-19 outbreak. Generalized additive models were used to quantify the effects of RSVs of GI symptom terms on the incidence of COVID-19. In addition, dose-response analyses were applied to estimate the shape of the associations. RESULTS: The RSVs of GI symptom terms could be characterized by seasonal variation and a high correlation with symptoms of "fever" and "cough" at both global and regional levels; in particular, "diarrhea" and "loss of taste" were abnormally increased during the outbreak period of COVID-19, with elevated point changes of 1.31 and 8 times, respectively. In addition, these symptom terms could effectively predict a COVID-19 outbreak in advance, underlying the lag correlation at 12 and 5 days, respectively, and with mutual independence. The dose-response curves showed a consistent increase in daily COVID-19 risk with increasing search volumes of "diarrhea" and "loss of taste". CONCLUSION: This is the first and largest epidemiologic study that comprehensively revealed the advanced prediction of COVID-19 outbreaks at both global and regional levels via GI symptom indicators.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Epidemiologic Studies , Humans , Internet , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Journal of Biosafety and Biosecurity ; 3(2):67-71, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1355671

ABSTRACT

China is one of the countries with the richest wildlife population. The large variety of widely distributed species act as natural or susceptible hosts for numerous infectious diseases. It is estimated that there are more than 1.2 million unknown virus species in China, and there might be 10,000–30,000 unknown bacteria in wild mammals on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau alone. There are no less than 600,000 species of animal-borne parasites and approximately 2 million species of fungi worldwide. With rapid economic growth and globalization, humans and wildlife interact more frequently, which enhances the probability of wildlife-borne pathogens infecting humans. The occurrence of animal-borne infectious diseases will become the “new normal” we have to face in the future. Therefore, research should be carried out on wildlife-borne microorganisms and the prevention and control of emerging infectious diseases to establish an analytical framework and an evaluation technology system for risk assessment and early warning of potential animal-borne emerging infectious diseases. This will not only improve our understanding of wildlife-borne microbial communities but also enable in-depth analysis, discovery, early warning, and even prediction of major animal-borne emerging infectious diseases that might occur in the future. Furthermore, this research will reduce response times, minimize the social and economic impact and losses, enable interventions related to the emergence or spread of the disease as early as possible, and comprehensively improve our management of infectious disease outbreaks.

8.
Front Public Health ; 9: 678738, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315961

ABSTRACT

Background: Infections are the second leading cause of death among patients undergoing hemodialysis. However, preventive measures against infectious diseases are limited and have not been made mandatory for patients. Objective: To investigate the incidence of infectious diseases before and during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Design: A historical comparative study of a prospective cohort. Setting(s): February 1, 2015 to January 31, 2020 was defined as the period before the mitigative confrontation of the COVID-19 pandemic in China. The period from February 1 to June 29, 2020 was defined as the period of mitigative confrontation of the COVID-19 pandemic in China. Participants: A cohort of patients undergoing hemodialysis whose infectious disease episodes were documented prospectively in the hemodialysis unit of the Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University since February 1, 2015. Methods: Mandatory mask-wearing and reinforced hand-hygiene education were implemented to prevent COVID-19 from January 23, 2020 in China. The incidence of infectious episodes, including catheter-related infection, digestive tract infection, upper respiratory tract infection (UTRI), pneumonia, and infection at other sites, were documented and compared in the periods before and during the pandemic. Results: The historical control group consisted of 157 patients, with 79 patients in the COVID-19 prevention group. The mask-wearing rate of patients increased from 1.5 to 100%. Hand sanitizer consumption increased significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic. The compliance rates of hand hygiene increased from 66, 75.5, to 55% in physicians, nurses, and other employees before the pandemic to 90.5, 92.5, and 76.5%, respectively. The incidences of UTRI and pneumonia decreased during the pandemic (p < 0.001). Notably, catheter-related and digestive tract infections also decreased during the pandemic (p = 0.003 and 0.034, respectively). A matched-pair study was conducted to further analyze the 79 individual changes in the incidences of infectious disease before and during the pandemic. As a result, the incidences of UTRI, pneumonia, catheter-related infections, digestive tract infections, and infections at other sites all decreased during the pandemic. Conclusions: The present study indicated an association between mandatory mask-wearing and reinforced hand hygiene education and decreased respiratory, catheter-related, and digestive tract infection episodes in the hemodialysis unit.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Hand Hygiene , China/epidemiology , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2
9.
World J Gastroenterol ; 27(22): 3022-3036, 2021 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268365

ABSTRACT

In the early December 2019, a novel coronavirus named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 was first reported in Wuhan, China, followed by an outbreak that spread around the world. Numerous studies have shown that liver injury is common in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and may aggravate the severity of the disease. However, the exact cause and specific mechanism of COVID-associated liver injury needs to be elucidated further. In this review, we present an analysis of the clinical features, potential mechanisms, and treatment strategies for liver injury associated with COVID-19. We hope that this review would benefit clinicians in devising better strategies for management of such patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Liver Diseases/virology , COVID-19/complications , China/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
10.
JMIR Ment Health ; 8(2): e27596, 2021 Feb 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110193

ABSTRACT

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.2196/23125.].

11.
Front Psychol ; 12: 612007, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1094209

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of COVID-19 has greatly affected university students' studies and life. This study aimed to examine the possible mediating role of psychological capital and the moderating role of academic burnout in the relationship between problematic social media usage and anxiety among university students during COVID-19. A total of 3,123 undergraduates from universities in Shanghai participated in an online survey from March to April 2020. The results showed that problematic social media usage among university students predicted their levels of anxiety. Mediation analysis indicated that psychological capital mediated the relationship between problematic social media usage and anxiety. Furthermore, for university students whose academic performance had been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, the effects of both problematic social media usage and the psychological capital on anxiety were moderated by academic burnout. For university students whose academic performance was not affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, academic burnout moderated the effects of psychological capital but not the effects of problematic social media usage on anxiety. The results highlighted the underlying mechanisms in the relationship between problematic social media usage and anxiety. These findings provide practical insights into the development and implementation of psychological interventions when facing a pandemic.

12.
JMIR Ment Health ; 8(1): e23125, 2021 01 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1040100

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of COVID-19 has dominated headlines worldwide. The number of infections has continued to rise and had reached 30,000 worldwide at the time this paper was written. Because of the high risk of nosocomial transmission, medical health care workers may be experiencing substantial psychological stress. This descriptive study aimed to identify psychosocial effects on hospital staff associated with working in a hospital environment during the COVID-19 outbreak. OBJECTIVE: Our survey participants included 57 frontline clinicians working at Wuhan First Hospital and 157 medical students working at Jiangsu Provincial People's Hospital during the COVID-19 outbreak. The questionnaire we adopted included questions regarding the participants' personal well-being, sociodemographic characteristics, and psychological status. METHODS: 57 frontline clinicians working in Wuhan First Hospital and 157 medical training students working in Jiangsu Provincial Peoples Hospital during this outbreak participated in our survey. The questionnaire we adopted included questions regarding the participants' personal well-being, sociodemographic characteristics and the psychological status. RESULTS: The COVID-19 outbreak had psychological impacts both on formal workers and medical students. The psychological effects included sleep disorders, anxiety, and depression. There was no significant difference between the group of formal workers and medical students (P=.85), and more than 50% (30/54, 56%, vs. 83/157, 52.9%) of the respondents reported pandemic-related mental disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that the high risk of SARS-CoV-2 exposure caused substantial psychological stress among health care workers. This finding emphasizes the need to promote psychological crisis intervention for medical personnel during this epidemic.

14.
Front Psychiatry ; 11: 598712, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000154

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic is a major public health issue and challenge to health professionals. In similar epidemics, nurses experienced more distress than other providers. Methods: We surveyed both on-duty nurses caring for infected patients and second-line nurses caring for uninfected patients from Hubei and other provinces throughout China. Results: We received completed surveys from 1,364 nurses from 22 provinces: 658 front-line and 706 second-line nurses. The median (IQR) GHQ-28 score of all nurses was 17 (IQR 11-24). The overall incidence of mild-to-moderate distress (GHQ score > 5) was 28%; that for severe distress (GHQ score > 11) was 6%. The incidence of mild-to-moderate distress in the second-line nurses was higher than that in the front-line nurses (31 vs. 25%; OR, 0.74; 95 CI, 0.58-0.94). Living alone (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.44-0.86) and feeling supported (OR, 0.82, 95% CI, 0.74-0.90) independently predicted lower anxiety. Conclusions: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the psychological problems of all nurses were generally serious. The interviewed second-line nurses face more serious issues than the front-line nurses.

15.
JMIR Ment Health ; 8(1): e23125, 2021 01 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-993065

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of COVID-19 has dominated headlines worldwide. The number of infections has continued to rise and had reached 30,000 worldwide at the time this paper was written. Because of the high risk of nosocomial transmission, medical health care workers may be experiencing substantial psychological stress. This descriptive study aimed to identify psychosocial effects on hospital staff associated with working in a hospital environment during the COVID-19 outbreak. OBJECTIVE: Our survey participants included 57 frontline clinicians working at Wuhan First Hospital and 157 medical students working at Jiangsu Provincial People's Hospital during the COVID-19 outbreak. The questionnaire we adopted included questions regarding the participants' personal well-being, sociodemographic characteristics, and psychological status. METHODS: 57 frontline clinicians working in Wuhan First Hospital and 157 medical training students working in Jiangsu Provincial Peoples Hospital during this outbreak participated in our survey. The questionnaire we adopted included questions regarding the participants' personal well-being, sociodemographic characteristics and the psychological status. RESULTS: The COVID-19 outbreak had psychological impacts both on formal workers and medical students. The psychological effects included sleep disorders, anxiety, and depression. There was no significant difference between the group of formal workers and medical students (P=.85), and more than 50% (30/54, 56%, vs. 83/157, 52.9%) of the respondents reported pandemic-related mental disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that the high risk of SARS-CoV-2 exposure caused substantial psychological stress among health care workers. This finding emphasizes the need to promote psychological crisis intervention for medical personnel during this epidemic.

16.
Int J Nurs Stud ; 114: 103809, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-929095

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a public health emergency of international concern and has caused traumatic experience for nurses worldwide. However, the prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms in nurses, and how psychosocial factors influence nurses in this public crisis are unknown. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of COVID-19 on the mental health of nurses and the prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms among nurses in China during the outbreak. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. SETTINGS AND PARTICIPANTS: A total of 3,228 nurses in Sichuan Province and Wuhan City were selected by convenience sampling. All participants were invited to complete the questionnaire through WeChat from January 27 to February 3, 2020. METHODS: A self-reported questionnaire combining depression and anxiety scale was used to collect data anonymously. Binary and multivariate logistic regression was applied to measure the odds of psychosocial factors of anxiety and depression and perceived health, respectively. RESULTS: The total incidence of depression (34.3%) and anxiety (18.1%) during the COVID-19 outbreak was lower than that during the SARS outbreak; however, the rate of depression in our study (47.1%) was high and similar in a recent study (50.4%) about the health care workers exposed to COVID-19 in China. The results indicated that COVID-19-related stress, relationship quality with family, and demographic characteristics were associated with depression, anxiety, and perceived health status. Furthermore, the prevalence of depression was similar between nurses working in low-risk COVID-19 wards was as high as working in high-risk COVID-19 wards (OR, 1.078; 95% CI, 0.784-1.481). CONCLUSIONS: Our study revealed the high prevalence of depression and anxiety among nurses during the outbreak of COVID-19. COVID-19 factors and psychosocial factors were associated with mental health of nurses. The results suggest that hospitals should implement effective mental health promotion programs focused on occupational safety and family support to improve the well-being of nurses.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Nurses/psychology , Adult , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Self Report , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Clinical eHealth ; 3:7-15, 2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-822402

ABSTRACT

The aim is to diagnose COVID-19 earlier and to improve its treatment by applying medical technology, the “COVID-19 Intelligent Diagnosis and Treatment Assistant Program (nCapp)” based on the Internet of Things. Terminal eight functions can be implemented in real-time online communication with the “cloud” through the page selection key. According to existing data, questionnaires, and check results, the diagnosis is automatically generated as confirmed, suspected, or suspicious of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) infection. It classifies patients into mild, moderate, severe or critical pneumonia. nCapp can also establish an online COVID-19 real-time update database, and it updates the model of diagnosis in real time based on the latest real-world case data to improve diagnostic accuracy. Additionally, nCapp can guide treatment. Front-line physicians, experts, and managers are linked to perform consultation and prevention. nCapp also contributes to the long-term follow-up of patients with COVID-19. The ultimate goal is to enable different levels of COVID-19 diagnosis and treatment among different doctors from different hospitals to upgrade to the national and international through the intelligent assistance of the nCapp system. In this way, we can block disease transmission, avoid physician infection, and epidemic prevention and control as soon as possible.

18.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-1961

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continues to spread worldwide

19.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-675

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a pandemic. Despite of the growing number of patients with COVID-19 infection, data on the clinical c

20.
Zhongguo Xiu Fu Chong Jian Wai Ke Za Zhi ; 34(8): 1036-1040, 2020 Aug 15.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-719850

ABSTRACT

At present, the 2019-nCoV epidemic situation is in severe and complex period. In order to prevent the virus from invading and infecting, it is very important and urgent for medical personnel to protect themselves. However, in the process of using protective equipment by medical personnel, the performance of device related pressure injuries (DRPI) caused by pain, numbness, redness, and even breakage caused by the equipment has seriously endangered the health of medical personnel. This article, based on Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers/Injuries: Quick Reference Guide 2019, references, and clinical experiences of wound specialists in West China Hospital of Sichuan University, summarize the preventive and protective measures of West China Hospital for medical personnel to prevent DRPI, so as to provide clinical preventive measurements for medical personnel.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Equipment Failure , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Pressure , SARS-CoV-2
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