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1.
Biosci Trends ; 16(3): 230-237, 2022 Jul 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1964372

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to investigate the medical and healthcare needs of cancer patients during the Shanghai lockdown due to the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron pandemic. From April 15 to April 21, 2022, 4,195 cancer patients from every district in Shanghai were surveyed using quota sampling via an online platform. The questionnaire consisted of three main parts: demographic and sociological data, disease diagnosis, and different dimensions of patients' needs. Correlation analysis was used to examine the relationship between participants' need scores in each dimension, and generalized linear regression models were used to analyze the factors influencing patients' need scores. The mean age of participants was 63.23 years (SD: 7.43 years), with more female than male participants (80.38% vs. 19.62%). Among participants, the three leading groups of patients were those with breast cancer (39.02%), colorectal cancer (12.82%), or tracheal and bronchial lung cancer (10.23%). Social support, dietary/nutritional support, and psychological counselling ranked as the top three needs of cancer patients. In addition, vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 may reduce psychological anxiety in cancer patients. Compared to participants who had never received the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, participants who had received one, two, or three doses of the vaccine were respectively 36% (odds ratio (OR): 0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56-0.73), 38% (OR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.59-0.54), and 37% (OR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.60-0.66) less likely to have an increased need for psychological counseling. In light of constraints on offline medical resources for cancer patients during the lockdown, the current authors have begun to re-examine the universal accessibility and spread of telemedicine in the future. In addition, immune barriers can be established for cancer patients and vaccination guidelines for different disease stages, tumor types, and treatment regimens can be explored in detail.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines , China/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325014

ABSTRACT

Background: The social order of the whole world has been disrupted since the COVID-19 outbreak. In China, we added novel coronavirus pneumonia to the list of Class B notifiable infectious diseases, and we placed Class A notifiable infectious diseases under strict monitoring. Therefore, it is significant that we study the features and social determinants of the incidence of both Class A and B infectious diseases. Methods: : We analyzed the annual percentage change in the incidence of overall infectious diseases and the four main diseases by descriptive statistics analysis, estimated the differences in the incidence of infections in seven regions over 15 years by using a generalized estimation equation (GEE), and then determined social determinants affecting these infectious diseases by using a panel data model. Results: : The incidence of overall Class A and B infectious diseases has been declining since January 2004. The infectious diseases with the highest yearly incidence were hepatitis, tuberculosis, syphilis, and bacterial and amoebic dysentery, with an incidence rate that has remained stable over the past 15 years. The locations of disease incidence in ascending order from low to high was East China, Northeast China, North China, Southwest China, Central China, South China, and Northwest China ( c 2 =68.60 p <0.001). The changes in the characteristics of yearly incidence varied ( c 2 =44.84 p <0.001). We found that two determinants, namely, percentage of people with illiteracy in the total population aged 15 years and older ( p =0.01) and number of family health service people per capita ( p <0.001), were positive for infectious diseases. Three determinants, including public green areas per capita ( p <0.001), number of public transportation vehicles per 10 000 people ( p =0.02) and area of paved roads per capita ( p <0.001), were negative for infectious diseases. Conclusions: : We successfully prevented and controlled Class A and B infectious diseases after the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003. Over the years, hepatitis and tuberculosis have had the highest incidence among infectious diseases and thus more attention needs to be given to these diseases. Social determinants had a significant influence on infectious diseases. Some strategies related to social determinants are needed to prevent infectious diseases.

3.
Ann Transl Med ; 9(16): 1297, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395508

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The expansion of large hospitals on the medical service market's supply side has always been an intensely debated topic. In this study, we conducted statistical analysis on the natural shock of COVID-19 to investigate whether the large hospitals will draw health demand from the small hospitals when a supply capacity surplus is present, a phenomenon otherwise known as the "siphon effect". METHODS: We collected the monthly hospital income and service data, including outpatient income, inpatient income, number of visits, and discharges, from all public hospitals, from January 2018 to July 2020 in Shanghai. A difference-in-differences (DIDs) method was applied to analyze the existence of the large hospitals' siphon effect by identifying the differences in the healthcare service market share change between large and small hospital groups at the height of pandemic (February and March, 2020) and the postpandemic period (April and May, 2020). Case mix index (CMI) was used to verify whether the reduction in healthcare amount and market share of small hospitals was due to unnecessary care. RESULTS: In total, 156 public hospitals, including 46 large hospitals and 110 small hospitals, with an average number of beds of 1,079.21 and 345.25, respectively, were involved in this study. At the height of the pandemic, the healthcare service volume and revenue in public hospitals in Shanghai experienced a sharp decline, especially for large hospitals and inpatient services. Compared to small hospitals at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, large hospitals' market share decreased significantly in outpatient and inpatient services for overall and nonlocal patients (P<0.05). During the postpandemic period, large hospitals' market share increased significantly in outpatient and inpatient services for overall and local patients (P<0.05). This increase was more substantial in inpatient services. CONCLUSIONS: Under conditions of the COVID-19 pandemic of higher care-seeking costs in the large hospitals, some of the healthcare services typically provided by large hospitals were then supplied by small hospitals. Furthermore, the siphon effect of large hospitals could be clearly observed when a supply capacity surplus was present and external constraint on patients' care-seeking behavior was absent.

4.
Ann Transl Med ; 8(11): 726, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-631865
5.
Glob Health Med ; 2(2): 89-95, 2020 Apr 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-47191

ABSTRACT

In the fight against the COVID-19 epidemic, the Chinese Government has enhanced its use of Internet-based healthcare. A large number of online medical platforms designed for COVID-19 have emerged in China. These platforms can be categorized according to the entity operating them, mainly the government, hospitals, and companies. Online medical platforms run by public hospitals provide follow-up consultations for common ailments and frequent ailments based on the hospital's offline services. Online diagnosis and treatment platforms provided by companies cover most of the regions in China. In terms of offering pandemic-related services, corporate platforms provide at least 1,636,440 doctors for online care, 1.685 billion consultations, and 109 million remote consultations. In terms of regular medical care, those platforms provide at least 940,182 doctors for online care and 13.7 million remote consultations; more than 84,916 specialists have provided online care during this period. During the prevention and control of this epidemic, online diagnosis and treatment has filled the gap of family doctors in epidemic prevention and control, it has reduced the chance of cross-infection of patients with a mild infection, and it has overcome the geographical limitations of medical resources. However, online diagnosis and treatment still faces challenges in terms of resource allocation and industry supervision.

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