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1.
JACC Cardiovasc Interv ; 16(3): 247-257, 2023 02 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2245250

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and iodinated contrast shortage may have affected interventional cardiology (IC) fellowship training. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the educational experience of first-year IC fellows in the United States and Canada. METHODS: A 59-question online survey was conducted among 2021-2022 first-year IC fellows in the United States and Canada. RESULTS: Of the 360 IC fellows invited to participate, 111 (31%) responded; 95% were from the United States, and 79% were men. Participants were mostly from university programs (70%), spent 61 to 70 hours/week in the hospital, and had an annual percutaneous coronary intervention case number of <200 (5%), 200 to 249 (8%), 250 to 349 (33%), 350 to 499 (39%), 500 to 699 (12%), or ≥700 (3%). For femoral access, a micropuncture needle was used regularly by 89% and ultrasound-guided puncture by 81%, and 43% used vascular closure devices in most cases (>80%). Intravascular ultrasound was performed and interpreted very comfortably by 62% and optical coherence tomography (OCT) by 32%, and 20% did not have access to OCT. Approximately one-third felt very comfortable performing various atherectomy techniques. Covered stents, fat embolization, and coil embolization were used very comfortably by 14%, 4%, and 3%, respectively. Embolic protection devices were used very comfortably by 11% to 24% of IC fellows. Almost one-quarter of fellows (24%) were warned about their high radiation exposure. Eighty-four percent considered IC fellowship somewhat or very stressful, and 16% reported inadequate psychological support. CONCLUSIONS: This survey highlights opportunities for improvement with regard to the use of intravascular imaging, atherectomy techniques, complication prevention and management strategies, radiation awareness and mitigation, and psychological support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology , Male , Humans , United States , Female , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires , Cardiology/education , Canada
3.
Am J Cardiovasc Dis ; 12(4): 153-169, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2045926

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, an unprecedented outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), an infectious disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) began to spread internationally, now impacting more than 293,750,692 patients with 5,454,131 deaths globally as of January 5, 2022. COVID-19 is highly pathogenic and contagious which has caused a large-scale epidemic impacting more deaths than the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2002-2003 or the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) epidemic in 2012-2013. Although COVID-19 symptoms are mild in most people, in those with pre-existing comorbidities there is an increased risk of progression to severe disease and death. In an attempt to mitigate this pandemic, urgent public health measures including quarantining exposed individuals and social distancing have been implemented in most states, while some states have even started the process of re-opening after considering both the economic and public health consequences of social distancing measures. While prevention is crucial, both novel agents and medications already in use with other indications are being investigated in clinical trials for patients with COVID-19. The collaboration between healthcare providers, health systems, patients, private sectors, and local and national governments is needed to protect both healthcare providers and patients to ultimately overcome this pandemic. The purpose of this review is to summarize the peer-reviewed and preprint literature on the epidemiology, transmission, clinical presentation, and available therapies as well as to propose a preventive strategy to overcome the present global pandemic.

7.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 9(12): e017013, 2020 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255734

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has infected more than 3.0 million people worldwide and killed more than 200,000 as of April 27, 2020. In this White Paper, we address the cardiovascular co-morbidities of COVID-19 infection; the diagnosis and treatment of standard cardiovascular conditions during the pandemic; and the diagnosis and treatment of the cardiovascular consequences of COVID-19 infection. In addition, we will also address various issues related to the safety of healthcare workers and the ethical issues related to patient care in this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Global Health , Humans , Incidence , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Curr Cardiol Rep ; 23(6): 69, 2021 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219006

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To identify and address the challenges associated with the care of ACS patients during the coronavirus 2019 pandemic. RECENT FINDINGS: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a considerable global impact with over 2.0 million deaths worldwide so far. There has been considerable evidence suggesting that COVID-19 increases the risk of acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We propose characterizing ACS patients into 3 distinct categories to better assist in appropriate triage and management: critically ill patients, non-critically ill ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients, and non-critically ill non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI)/unstable angina (UA) patients. We thoroughly review treatments strategies, management considerations, and current consensus statements for the care of COVID-19 patients with ACS. As we continue to gain more experience with management of COVID-19 in ACS patients and as health-care workers and patients continue to get vaccinated, we must continue to adapt our strategies to treat this high-risk group of patients.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome , COVID-19 , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction , Acute Coronary Syndrome/epidemiology , Acute Coronary Syndrome/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Am J Cardiovasc Dis ; 10(4): 479-489, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-937997

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, an unprecedented outbreak of pneumonia cases associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) first occurred in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. The disease, later named Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) by the World Health Organization (WHO), was caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), and on January 30, 2020, the WHO declared the outbreak of COVID-19 to be a public health emergency. COVID-19 is now a global pandemic impacting more than 43,438,043 patients with 1,158,596 deaths globally as of August 26th, 2020. COVID-19 is highly contagious and has caused more deaths than SARS in 2002-2003 or the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in 2012-2013 combined and represents an unprecedented human affliction not seen since the influenza pandemic of 1918. COVID-19 has been associated with several cardiac complications, including hypercoagulability, acute myocardial injury and myocarditis, arrhythmias, and acute coronary syndromes. Patients with pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD) are at the highest risk for myocardial injury and mortality among infected patients. The mechanism by which COVID-infected patients develop cardiac complications remains unclear, though it may be mediated by increased ACE-2 gene expression. Despite initial concerns, there is no evidence that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) therapy increases risk for myocardial injury among those infected with COVID-19. In the current report, we summarize the peer-reviewed and preprint literature on cardiovascular risks and complications associated with COVID-19, as well as provide insights into its pathogenesis and management.

10.
Cardiol Ther ; 9(2): 523-534, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-871593

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We sought to determine the effectiveness and safety of hydroxychloroquine-azithromycin (HCQ-AZM) therapy in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of 613 patients hospitalized (integrated health system involving three hospitals) for RT-PCR-confirmed COVID-19 infection between March 1, 2020 and April 25, 2020. Intervention was treatment with HCQ-AZM in hospitalized patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Outcomes of interest were in-hospital all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, pulseless electrical activity (PEA) arrest, non-lethal arrhythmias, and length of hospital stay. Secondary measures included in-hospital corrected QT (QTc) interval parameters and serum biomarkers levels. RESULTS: Propensity-matched groups were composed of 173 patients given HCQ-AZM and 173 matched patients who did not receive treatment. There was no significant difference in in-hospital mortality (odds ratio [OR] 1.52; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-2.89; p = 0.2), PEA arrest (OR 1.68, CI 0.68-4.15; p = 0.27), or incidence of non-lethal arrhythmias (10.4% vs. 6.8%; p = 0.28). Length of hospital stay (10.5 ± 7.4 vs. 5.8 ± 6.1; p < 0.001), peak CRP levels (252 ± 136 vs. 166 ± 124; p < 0.0001), and degree of QTc interval prolongation was higher for the HCQ-AZM group (28 ± 32 vs. 9 ± 32; p < 0.0001), but there was no significant difference in incidence of sustained ventricular arrhythmias (2.8% vs. 1.7%; p = 0.52). HCQ-AZM was stopped in 10 patients because of QT interval prolongation and 1 patient because of drug-related polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. CONCLUSION: In this propensity-matched study, there was no difference in in-hospital mortality, life-threatening arrhythmias, or incidence of PEA arrest between the HCQ-AZM and untreated control groups. QTc intervals were longer in patients receiving HCQ-AZM, but only one patient developed drug-related ventricular tachycardia.

13.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 9(19): e017787, 2020 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680409

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has emerged as a global pandemic and public health crisis. Increasing waves of intermittent infectious outbreaks have dramatically influenced care among broad populations. Over the past 2 decades, there has been a rapid increase in cancer survival, with >400 000 new survivors each year. The increasingly common presence of cardiovascular disease in patients during or after cancer treatment led to the rapid growth of the field of cardio-oncology with a mandate of identifying, treating, and preventing the various forms of cardiovascular disease seen among this population. This review evaluates the implications of the pandemic on the practice and study of cardio-oncology. The evolving understanding of the relationship between comorbid disease and clinical outcomes among this population is assessed. With the impetus of the pandemic, cardio-oncology can be deliberate in embracing changes to cardiac screening, monitoring, and intervention during oncology care. Bridging 2 specialties, consideration of the lessons learned in cancer and cardiovascular may pivotally inform ongoing therapeutic efforts. Further, the development of multicenter registries focused on understanding and optimizing outcomes among these patients should be considered. Together, these insights may critically inform strategies for the care of cardio-oncology patients in future phases of the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Medical Oncology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Public Health , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Global Health , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate/trends
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