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2.
Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med ; 40(4): 100931, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1306763

ABSTRACT

AIM: Describing acute respiratory distress syndrome patterns, therapeutics management, and outcomes of ICU COVID-19 patients and indentifying risk factors of 28-day mortality. METHODS: Prospective multicentre, cohort study conducted in 29 French ICUs. Baseline characteristics, comorbidities, adjunctive therapies, ventilatory support at ICU admission and survival data were collected. RESULTS: From March to July 2020, 966 patients were enrolled with a median age of 66 (interquartile range 58-73) years and a median SAPS II of 37 (29-48). During the first 24 h of ICU admission, COVID-19 patients received one of the following respiratory supports: mechanical ventilation for 559 (58%), standard oxygen therapy for 228 (24%) and high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) for 179 (19%) patients. Overall, 721 (75%) patients were mechanically ventilated during their ICU stay. Prone positioning and neuromuscular blocking agents were used in 494 (51%) and 460 (48%) patients, respectively. Bacterial co-infections and ventilator-associated pneumonia were diagnosed in 79 (3%) and 411 (43%) patients, respectively. The overall 28-day mortality was 18%. Age, pre-existing comorbidities, severity of respiratory failure and the absence of antiviral therapy on admission were identified as independent predictors of 28-day outcome. CONCLUSION: Severity of hypoxaemia on admission, older age (> 70 years), cardiovascular and renal comorbidities were associated with worse outcome in COVID-19 patients. Antiviral treatment on admission was identified as a protective factor for 28-day mortality. Ascertaining the outcomes of critically ill COVID-19 patients is crucial to optimise hospital and ICU resources and provide the appropriate intensity level of care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Cohort Studies , Critical Care , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial
5.
Clin Kidney J ; 13(3): 354-361, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-549250

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) frequency, severity and characterization in critically ill patients has not been reported. METHODS: Single-centre cohort performed from 3 March 2020 to 14 April 2020 in four intensive care units in Bordeaux University Hospital, France. All patients with COVID-19 and pulmonary severity criteria were included. AKI was defined using Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. A systematic urinary analysis was performed. The incidence, severity, clinical presentation, biological characterization (transient versus persistent AKI; proteinuria, haematuria and glycosuria) and short-term outcomes were evaluated. RESULTS: Seventy-one patients were included, with basal serum creatinine (SCr) of 69 ± 21 µmol/L. At admission, AKI was present in 8/71 (11%) patients. Median [interquartile range (IQR)] follow-up was 17 (12-23) days. AKI developed in a total of 57/71 (80%) patients, with 35% Stage 1, 35% Stage 2 and 30% Stage 3 AKI; 10/57 (18%) required renal replacement therapy (RRT). Transient AKI was present in only 4/55 (7%) patients and persistent AKI was observed in 51/55 (93%). Patients with persistent AKI developed a median (IQR) urine protein/creatinine of 82 (54-140) (mg/mmol) with an albuminuria/proteinuria ratio of 0.23 ± 20, indicating predominant tubulointerstitial injury. Only two (4%) patients had glycosuria. At Day 7 after onset of AKI, six (11%) patients remained dependent on RRT, nine (16%) had SCr >200 µmol/L and four (7%) had died. Day 7 and Day 14 renal recovery occurred in 28% and 52%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Severe COVID-19-associated AKI is frequent, persistent, severe and characterized by an almost exclusive tubulointerstitial injury without glycosuria.

6.
Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med ; 39(3): 395-415, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-549176

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The world is currently facing an unprecedented healthcare crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The objective of these guidelines is to produce a framework to facilitate the partial and gradual resumption of intervention activity in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The group has endeavoured to produce a minimum number of recommendations to highlight the strengths to be retained in the 7 predefined areas: (1) protection of staff and patients; (2) benefit/risk and patient information; (3) preoperative assessment and decision on intervention; (4) modalities of the preanaesthesia consultation; (5) specificity of anaesthesia and analgesia; (6) dedicated circuits and (7) containment exit type of interventions. RESULTS: The SFAR Guideline panel provides 51 statements on anaesthesia management in the context of COVID-19 pandemic. After one round of discussion and various amendments, a strong agreement was reached for 100% of the recommendations and algorithms. CONCLUSION: We present suggestions for how the risk of transmission by and to anaesthetists can be minimised and how personal protective equipment policies relate to COVID-19 pandemic context.


Subject(s)
Analgesia/standards , Anesthesia/standards , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Infection Control/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Airway Management , Analgesia/adverse effects , Analgesia/methods , Anesthesia/adverse effects , Anesthesia/methods , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Critical Pathways , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Cross Infection/transmission , Disinfection , Elective Surgical Procedures , Equipment Contamination/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Informed Consent , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Operating Rooms/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Isolation , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Preoperative Care , Professional Staff Committees , Risk , SARS-CoV-2 , Symptom Assessment , Universal Precautions
7.
Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med ; 39(3): 329-332, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-245318

ABSTRACT

The first wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic required an unprecedented and historic increase in critical care capacity on a global scale in France. Authors and members from the ACUTE and REANIMATION committees of the French Society of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR) wished to share experience and insights gained during the first weeks of this pandemic. These were summarised following the World Health Organization Response Checklist and detailed according to the subsequent subheadings: 1. Command and Control, 2. Communication, 3. Safety and Security, 4. Triage, 5. Surge Capacity, 6. Continuity of essential services, 7. Human resources, 8. Logistics and supply management, 9. Training/Preparation, 10. Psychological comfort for patients and next of kin, 11. Learning and 12. Post disaster recovery. These experience-based recommendations, consensual across all members from both committees of our national society, establish a practical framework for medical teams, either spared by the first wave of severe COVID patients or preparing for the second one.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Bed Conversion , COVID-19 , Checklist , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disaster Planning/organization & administration , France/epidemiology , Health Personnel/education , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Interdisciplinary Communication , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Professional Staff Committees/organization & administration , Professional-Family Relations , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support , Triage/organization & administration , Workforce/organization & administration , World Health Organization
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