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2.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 74(5): e21-e36, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1802065

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To provide guidance to rheumatology providers on the use of COVID-19 vaccines for patients with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs). METHODS: A task force was assembled that included 9 rheumatologists/immunologists, 2 infectious disease specialists, and 2 public health physicians. After agreeing on scoping questions, an evidence report was created that summarized the published literature and publicly available data regarding COVID-19 vaccine efficacy and safety, as well as literature for other vaccines in RMD patients. Task force members rated their agreement with draft consensus statements on a 9-point numerical scoring system, using a modified Delphi process and the RAND/University of California Los Angeles Appropriateness Method, with refinement and iteration over 2 sessions. Consensus was determined based on the distribution of ratings. RESULTS: Despite a paucity of direct evidence, statements were developed by the task force and agreed upon with consensus to provide guidance for use of the COVID-19 vaccines, including supplemental/booster dosing, in RMD patients and to offer recommendations regarding the use and timing of immunomodulatory therapies around the time of vaccination. CONCLUSION: These guidance statements are intended to provide direction to rheumatology health care providers on how to best use COVID-19 vaccines and to facilitate implementation of vaccination strategies for RMD patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Rheumatic Diseases , Rheumatology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Humans , Muscular Diseases , United States , Vaccination
3.
J Rheumatol ; 49(5): 523-530, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674900

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) hospitalization risk in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) compared with matched non-IMID comparators from the general population. METHODS: We conducted a population-based, matched cohort study using health administrative data from January to July 2020 in Ontario, Canada. Cohorts for each of the following IMIDs were assembled: rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis (PsA), ankylosing spondylitis, systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs), multiple sclerosis (MS), iritis, inflammatory bowel disease, polymyalgia rheumatica, and vasculitis. Each patient was matched with 5 non-IMID comparators based on sociodemographic factors. We compared the cumulative incidence of hospitalizations for COVID-19 and their outcomes between IMID and non-IMID patients. RESULTS: A total of 493,499 patients with IMID (417 hospitalizations) and 2,466,946 non-IMID comparators (1519 hospitalizations) were assessed. The odds of being hospitalized for COVID-19 were significantly higher in patients with IMIDs compared with their matched non-IMID comparators (matched unadjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.37, adjusted OR 1.23). Significantly higher risk of hospitalizations was found in patients with iritis (OR 1.46), MS (OR 1.83), PsA (OR 2.20), RA (OR 1.42), SARDs (OR 1.47), and vasculitis (OR 2.07). COVID-19 hospitalizations were associated with older age, male sex, long-term care residence, multimorbidity, and lower income. The odds of complicated hospitalizations were 21% higher among all IMID vs matched non-IMID patients, but this association was attenuated after adjusting for demographic factors and comorbidities. CONCLUSION: Patients with IMIDs were at higher risk of being hospitalized with COVID-19. This risk was explained in part by their comorbidities.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19 , Iritis , Multiple Sclerosis , Vasculitis , Arthritis, Psoriatic/epidemiology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Iritis/complications , Male , Ontario/epidemiology , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Vasculitis/complications
4.
Trials ; 22(1): 856, 2021 Nov 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542127

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma; SSc) is a rare autoimmune connective tissue disease. We completed an initial feasibility trial of an online self-administered version of the Scleroderma Patient-centered Intervention Network Self-Management (SPIN-SELF) Program using the cohort multiple randomized controlled trial (RCT) design. Due to low intervention offer uptake, we will conduct a new feasibility trial with progression to full-scale trial, using a two-arm parallel, partially nested RCT design. The SPIN-SELF Program has also been revised to include facilitator-led videoconference group sessions in addition to online material. We will test the group-based intervention delivery format, then evaluate the effect of the SPIN-SELF Program on disease management self-efficacy (primary) and patient activation, social appearance anxiety, and functional health outcomes (secondary). METHODS: This study is a feasibility trial with progression to full-scale RCT, pending meeting pre-defined criteria, of the SPIN-SELF Program. Participants will be recruited from the ongoing SPIN Cohort ( http://www.spinsclero.com/en/cohort ) and via social media and partner patient organizations. Eligible participants must have SSc and low to moderate disease management self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease (SEMCD) Scale score ≤ 7.0). Participants will be randomized (1:1 allocation) to the group-based SPIN-SELF Program or usual care for 3 months. The primary outcome in the full-scale trial will be disease management self-efficacy based on SEMCD Scale scores at 3 months post-randomization. Secondary outcomes include SEMCD scores 6 months post-randomization plus patient activation, social appearance anxiety, and functional health outcomes at 3 and 6 months post-randomization. We will include 40 participants to assess feasibility. At the end of the feasibility portion, stoppage criteria will be used to determine if the trial procedures or SPIN-SELF Program need important modifications, thereby requiring a re-set for the full-scale trial. Otherwise, the full-scale RCT will proceed, and outcome data from the feasibility portion will be utilized in the full-scale trial. In the full-scale RCT, 524 participants will be recruited. DISCUSSION: The SPIN-SELF Program may improve disease management self-efficacy, patient activation, social appearance anxiety, and functional health outcomes in people with SSc. SPIN works with partner patient organizations around the world to disseminate its programs free-of-charge. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04246528 . Registered on 27 January 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Scleroderma, Systemic , Self-Management , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Patient-Centered Care , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
5.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 73(10): e60-e75, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1400747

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To provide guidance to rheumatology providers on the use of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines for patients with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs). METHODS: A task force was assembled that included 9 rheumatologists/immunologists, 2 infectious disease specialists, and 2 public health physicians. After agreeing on scoping questions, an evidence report was created that summarized the published literature and publicly available data regarding COVID-19 vaccine efficacy and safety, as well as literature for other vaccines in RMD patients. Task force members rated their agreement with draft consensus statements on a 9-point numerical scoring system, using a modified Delphi process and the RAND/University of California Los Angeles Appropriateness Method, with refinement and iteration over 2 sessions. Consensus was determined based on the distribution of ratings. RESULTS: Despite a paucity of direct evidence, 74 draft guidance statements were developed by the task force and agreed upon with consensus to provide guidance for use of the COVID-19 vaccines in RMD patients and to offer recommendations regarding the use and timing of immunomodulatory therapies around the time of vaccination. CONCLUSION: These guidance statements, made in the context of limited clinical data, are intended to provide direction to rheumatology health care providers on how to best use COVID-19 vaccines and to facilitate implementation of vaccination strategies for RMD patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Rheumatic Diseases , Rheumatology , Humans , United States
6.
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) ; 2021 Sep 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1391536

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the incidence of and factors associated with SARS-CoV-2 testing and infection in immune mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) versus matched non-IMIDs comparators from the general population. METHODS: We conducted a population-based, matched cohort study among adult residents from Ontario, Canada, from January to December 2020. We created cohorts for the following IMIDs: rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases, multiple sclerosis (MS), iritis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), polymyalgia rheumatica and vasculitis. Each patient was matched with five patients without IMIDs based on socio-demographic factors. We estimated the incidence of SARS-CoV-2 testing and infection in IMIDs and non-IMIDs patients. Multivariable logistic regressions assessed odds of SARS-CoV-2 infection. RESULTS: We studied 493,499 patients with IMIDs and 2,466,946 patients without IMIDs. Patients with IMIDs were more likely to have at least one SARS-CoV-2 test, versus patients without IMIDs (27.4% vs. 22.7%), but the proportion testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 was identical (0.9% in both groups). Overall, IMIDs patients had 20% higher odds of being tested for SARS-CoV-2 (odds ratio (OR) 1.20, 95% CI 1.19, 1.21). The odds of SARS-CoV-2 infection varied across IMIDs groups but was not significantly elevated for most IMID groups compared with non-IMIDs. The odds of SARS-CoV-2 infection was lower in IBD and MS and marginally higher in RA and iritis. CONCLUSIONS: Patients across all IMIDs were more likely to be tested for SARS-CoV-2 versus those without IMIDs. The risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection varied across disease sub-groups.

9.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 73(3): 548-549, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198365
10.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 72(8): 1241-1251, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-602110

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To provide guidance to rheumatology providers on the management of adult rheumatic disease in the context of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: A task force, including 10 rheumatologists and 4 infectious disease specialists from North America, was convened. Clinical questions were collated, and an evidence report was rapidly generated and disseminated. Questions and drafted statements were reviewed and assessed using a modified Delphi process. This included 2 rounds of asynchronous anonymous voting by e-mail and 3 webinars with the entire panel. Task force members voted on agreement with draft statements using a 1-9-point numerical scoring system, and consensus was determined to be low, moderate, or high based on the dispersion of votes. For approval, median votes were required to meet predefined levels of agreement (median values of 7-9, 4-6, and 1-3 defined as agreement, uncertainty, or disagreement, respectively) with either moderate or high levels of consensus. RESULTS: The task force approved 77 initial guidance statements: 36 with moderate and 41 with high consensus. These were combined, resulting in 25 final guidance statements. CONCLUSION: These guidance statements are provided to promote optimal care during the current pandemic. However, given the low level of available evidence and the rapidly evolving literature, this guidance is presented as a "living document," and future updates are anticipated.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Adult , Advisory Committees , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care , Delphi Technique , Deprescriptions , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Infection Control , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Rheumatic Diseases/complications , Rheumatology , SARS-CoV-2 , Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors/therapeutic use
11.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 73(2): e1-e12, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-985949

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To provide guidance to rheumatology providers on the management of adult rheumatic disease in the context of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: A task force, including 10 rheumatologists and 4 infectious disease specialists from North America, was convened. Clinical questions were collated, and an evidence report was rapidly generated and disseminated. Questions and drafted statements were reviewed and assessed using a modified Delphi process. This included asynchronous anonymous voting by email and webinars with the entire panel. Task force members voted on agreement with draft statements using a 1-9-point numerical scoring system, and consensus was determined to be low, moderate, or high based on the dispersion of votes. For approval, median votes were required to meet predefined levels of agreement (median values of 7-9, 4-6, and 1-3 defined as agreement, uncertainty, or disagreement, respectively) with either moderate or high levels of consensus. RESULTS: Draft guidance statements approved by the task force have been combined to form final guidance. CONCLUSION: These guidance statements are provided to promote optimal care during the current pandemic. However, given the low level of available evidence and the rapidly evolving literature, this guidance is presented as a "living document," and future updates are anticipated.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Rheumatic Diseases/therapy , Advisory Committees , COVID-19/complications , Consensus , Decision Making, Shared , Delivery of Health Care , Delphi Technique , Deprescriptions , Disease Management , Humans , Patient Education as Topic , Rheumatic Diseases/complications , Rheumatology , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
12.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 73(1): 36-47, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690992

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Antirheumatic disease therapies have been used to treat coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and its complications. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to describe the current evidence. METHODS: A search of published and preprint databases in all languages was performed. Included studies described ≥1 relevant clinical outcome for ≥5 patients who were infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and were treated with antirheumatic disease therapy between January 1, 2019 and May 29, 2020. Pairs of reviewers screened articles, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. A meta-analysis of effect sizes using random-effects models was performed when possible. RESULTS: The search identified 3,935 articles, of which 45 were included (4 randomized controlled trials, 29 cohort studies, and 12 case series). All studies evaluated hospitalized patients, and 29 of the 45 studies had been published in a peer-reviewed journal. In a meta-analysis of 3 cohort studies with a low risk of bias, hydroxychloroquine use was not significantly associated with mortality (pooled hazard ratio [HR] 1.41 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.83, 2.42]). In a meta-analysis of 2 cohort studies with some concerns/higher risk of bias, anakinra use was associated with lower mortality (pooled HR 0.25 [95% CI 0.12, 0.52]). Evidence was inconclusive with regard to other antirheumatic disease therapies, and the majority of other studies had a high risk of bias. CONCLUSION: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, hydroxychloroquine use was not associated with benefit or harm regarding COVID-19 mortality. The evidence supporting the effect of other antirheumatic disease therapies in COVID-19 is currently inconclusive.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Azetidines/therapeutic use , Bias , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Disease Progression , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/therapeutic use , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Proportional Hazards Models , Purines/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use
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