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1.
Cogent Medicine ; 8, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1617073

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has inevitably affected children and their families. This study examines the impact of the COVID-19 measures in children with chronic somatic conditions (CSC) and their parents and compares them with a Dutch general population sample. Methods: We included a sample of children with CSC (0-18 years, n=326) and compared them with children (8-18 years, n=1,287) from the Dutch general population. Perceived stress, coping, social interaction with friends and family, physical activity, eating behavior, family support, and financial situation were assessed with the digitally administered COVID-19 child check questionnaire between November 2020 and May 2021. Results: During the COVID-19 pandemic, children with CSC engaged less in physical activity and social interaction with friends compared with children from the general population. Children with CSC and their parents experienced less stress than children and parents from the general population. Moreover, parents of children with CSC aged 0-7 years and children aged 8-18 years from the general population experienced less support and more financial deterioration than parents of children with CSC aged 8-18 years. In the parents from the general population only, this deteriorated financial situation was associated with more stress, worse family interaction and parenting perception, and less received support. Conclusions: The impact of COVID-19 measures in children with CSC and their parents differed from those in the general population. Addressing the collateral damage of COVID-19 measures in children and their families can give direction to policy and potentially prevent (long-term) negative consequences.

2.
Clinical Nutrition ESPEN ; 46:S547-S548, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1540470
3.
Clin Nutr ; 40(3): 895-900, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198670

ABSTRACT

There are reports of children COVID-19 or COVID-19 like symptoms with hyperinflammatory multisystem syndrome, ARDS, gastrointestinal and atypical Kawasaki disease presenting to PICU worldwide temporally associated with COVID-19, for which there are important nutrition support considerations. As a result, the European Society of Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care - Metabolism, Endocrine and Nutrition group (ESPNIC-MEN) and paediatric nutritionists working in PICUs are being consulted regarding nutrition management of critically ill children with COVID-19 or COVID-19 like symptoms. Therefore, the aim of this short report is to provide a summary of nutrition support recommendations for critically ill children with COVID-19. They are based on the ESPNIC-MEN section recommendations published in January 2020 and surviving sepsis recommendations from February 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Nutritional Support/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Child , Critical Care/methods , Critical Illness , Enteral Nutrition/methods , Humans , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Nutritional Status
4.
Clin Nutr ESPEN ; 43: 383-389, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163553

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Different metabolic phases can be distinguished in critical illness, which influences nutritional treatment. Achieving optimal nutritional treatment during these phases in critically ill patients is challenging. COVID-19 patients seem particularly difficult to feed due to gastrointestinal problems. Our aim was to describe measured resting energy expenditure (mREE) and feeding practices and tolerance during the acute and late phases of critical illness in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Observational study including critically ill mechanically ventilated adult COVID-19 patients. Indirect calorimetry (Q-NRG+, Cosmed) was used to determine mREE during the acute (day 0-7) and late phase (>day 7) of critical illness. Data on nutritional intake, feeding tolerance and urinary nitrogen loss were collected simultaneously. A paired sample t-test was performed for mREE in both phases. RESULTS: We enrolled 21 patients with a median age of 59 years [44-66], 67% male and median BMI of 31.5 kg/m2 [25.7-37.8]. Patients were predominantly fed with EN in both phases. No significant difference in mREE was observed between phases (p = 0.529). Sixty-five percent of the patients were hypermetabolic in both phases. Median delivery of energy as percentage of mREE was higher in the late phase (94%) compared to the acute phase (70%) (p = 0.001). Urinary nitrogen losses were significant higher in the late phase (p = 0.003). CONCLUSION: In both the acute and late phase, the majority of the patients were hypermetabolic and fed enterally. In the acute phase patients were fed hypocaloric whereas in the late phase this was almost normocaloric, conform ESPEN guidelines. No significant difference in mREE was observed between phases. Hypermetabolism in both phases in conjunction with an increasing loss of urinary nitrogen may indicate that COVID-19 patients remain in a prolonged acute, catabolic phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Critical Illness , Energy Metabolism , Enteral Nutrition , Nutritional Requirements , Adult , Basal Metabolism , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care , Critical Illness/therapy , Disease Progression , Energy Intake , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nitrogen/urine , Parenteral Nutrition , Respiration, Artificial , Rest , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Clinical Nutrition ESPEN ; 40:440, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-942946

ABSTRACT

Rationale: The optimal feeding strategy in critically ill COVID-19 patients is challenging. They seem particularly difficult to feed enterally, presenting with high gastric residual volumes (GRV) and diarrhoea. Our aim was to describe feeding practises and measured resting energy expenditure (mREE) during the acute and late phases of critical illness. Methods: Observational study including critically ill mechanically ventilated adult COVID-19 patients. Indirect calorimetry (IC;Q-NRG+) was used to determine mREE during the acute (day 1-7) and late phase (> day 7) of critical illness. Data on enteral nutrition (EN) and parenteral nutrition (PN) were collected on the same day. Comparison of mREE and predicted REE (pREE) (mREE/pREE *100%) was performed to explore hypometabolism (<90%) and hypermetabolism (>110%). In both phases parameters for intolerance to EN were collected on consequent days such as GRV (mL/d), vomiting, abdominal distention and diarrhoea. Results: We enrolled 35 patients in whom 42 IC measurements were performed (20 acute phase;22 late phase). Median age 63 year [IQR 47-69], 80% male. BMI upon admission was 27.8 kg/m2 [IQR 24.2-34.0], 43% obese (BMI>30 kg/m2). During the acute phase mREE was 1956 kcal [IQR 1846-2441] and respiratory quotient (RQ) 0,72 [IQR 0,67-0,81];10% was hypometabolic, 60% hypermetabolic. The median delivery of energy was 64% of mREE. All patients received EN;70% via nasogastric tube (NGT) and 30% via nasoduodenal tube (NDT). Median GRV was 195 mL/d [IQR 41-450], 5% vomited, 5% abdominal distention and 20% diarrhoea. In the late phase mREE was 2374 kcal [IQR 1828-2711] and RQ 0,81 [IQR 0,74-0,86];9% was hypometabolic and 68% hypermetabolic. The median delivery of energy was 92% of mREE. All patients except one received EN;50% NGT and 50% NDT, with a median GRV of 48 mL/d [IQR 15-180]. A total of 5% vomited, 9% abdominal distention and 15% diarrhoea. Conclusion: In both the acute and late phase the majority of the patients were hypermetabolic. Almost all patients were fed enterally, with a slightly higher presence of EN intolerance parameters during the acute phase. In the acute phase patients were fed hypocaloric whereas in the late phase this was almost normocaloric (64% vs 92% of mREE) conform our ESPEN based nutrition protocol. Elaborate data analysis are planned and will be presented at the conference. Disclosure of Interest: None declared

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