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1.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(7): 1271-1274, 2022 Apr 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706426

ABSTRACT

Twenty-five B-cell-depleted patients (24 following anti-CD19/20 therapy) diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 had been symptomatic for a median of 26 days but remained antibody negative. All were treated with convalescent plasma with high neutralizing antibody titers. Twenty-one (84%) recovered, indicating the potential therapeutic effects of this therapy in this particular population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive , SARS-CoV-2
2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-319564

ABSTRACT

Purpose:  To study the effect of Interferon-α auto-antibodies (IFN-α Abs) on clinical and virological outcomes in critically ill COVID-19 patients and the risk of IFN-α Abs transfer during convalescent plasma treatment. Methods: : Sera from cases of COVID-19 and other respiratory illness were tested for IFN-αAbs by ELISA and bioassay. IFN-α Abslevels were compared between critically, severely and moderately ill groups in both acute and convalescent stages. Longitudinal analyses were performed to determine whether IFN-α Abs levels change after convalescent plasma transfusion. Results: : Critically ill COVID-19 caseshad significantly higher IFN-α Abs detection rate and levels compared tonon-COVID-19 controls.Neutralizing IFN-α Abs levels were found in 1 out of 118plasma donors.Plasma from 2 positive donors was administered to 5 patients, with no subsequent elevation of IFN-α Abs levels in the recipients. Neutralizing levels of IFN-α Abswere associated with delayed viral clearance from the respiratory tract. Conclusions: : IFN-α Abs can be detected by ELISA in critical, severe, moderate and mild COVID-19 cases in both the acute and convalescent stages of disease. The presence of neutralizing IFN-α Abs in critically ill COVID-19 is associated with delayed viral clearance. Levels of IFN-α Abs inCOVID-19 convalescent plasma donorsare likely too low to be clinically relevant to the recipients.

3.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(3): 521-524, 2022 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684544

ABSTRACT

During COVID-19 lockdown, the in-hospital number of HIV indicator conditions decreased disproportionally compared with other non-COVID-19 diseases, which was accompanied by reduced HIV testing rates, number and proportion of positive HIV tests, and new HIV referrals, with more late presentation after lockdown cessation, indicating a significantly impacted HIV care continuum.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Communicable Disease Control , Continuity of Patient Care , HIV , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Hospitals , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Clin Immunol ; 42(2): 232-239, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669888

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To study the effect of interferon-α2 auto-antibodies (IFN-α2 Abs) on clinical and virological outcomes in critically ill COVID-19 patients and the risk of IFN-α2 Abs transfer during convalescent plasma treatment. METHODS: Sera from healthy controls, cases of COVID-19, and other respiratory illness were tested for IFN-α2 Abs by ELISA and a pseudo virus-based neutralization assay. The effects of disease severity, sex, and age on the risk of having neutralizing IFN-α2 Abs were determined. Longitudinal analyses were performed to determine association between IFN-α2 Abs and survival and viral load and whether serum IFN-α2 Abs appeared after convalescent plasma transfusion. RESULTS: IFN-α2 neutralizing sera were found only in COVID-19 patients, with proportions increasing with disease severity and age. In the acute stage of COVID-19, all sera from patients with ELISA-detected IFN-α2 Abs (13/164, 7.9%) neutralized levels of IFN-α2 exceeding physiological concentrations found in human plasma and this was associated with delayed viral clearance. Convalescent plasma donors that were anti-IFN-α2 ELISA positive (3/118, 2.5%) did not neutralize the same levels of IFN-α2. Neutralizing serum IFN-α2 Abs were associated with delayed viral clearance from the respiratory tract. CONCLUSIONS: IFN-α2 Abs were detected by ELISA and neutralization assay in COVID-19 patients, but not in ICU patients with other respiratory illnesses. The presence of neutralizing IFN-α2 Abs in critically ill COVID-19 is associated with delayed viral clearance. IFN-α2 Abs in COVID-19 convalescent plasma donors were not neutralizing in the conditions tested.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Interferon alpha-2/immunology , Plasma/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Blood Component Transfusion/methods , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive/methods , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
5.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(7): 1271-1274, 2022 Apr 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320296

ABSTRACT

Twenty-five B-cell-depleted patients (24 following anti-CD19/20 therapy) diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 had been symptomatic for a median of 26 days but remained antibody negative. All were treated with convalescent plasma with high neutralizing antibody titers. Twenty-one (84%) recovered, indicating the potential therapeutic effects of this therapy in this particular population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 3189, 2021 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246368

ABSTRACT

In a randomized clinical trial of 86 hospitalized COVID-19 patients comparing standard care to treatment with 300mL convalescent plasma containing high titers of neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, no overall clinical benefit was observed. Using a comprehensive translational approach, we unravel the virological and immunological responses following treatment to disentangle which COVID-19 patients may benefit and should be the focus of future studies. Convalescent plasma is safe, does not improve survival, has no effect on the disease course, nor does plasma enhance viral clearance in the respiratory tract, influence SARS-CoV-2 antibody development or serum proinflammatory cytokines levels. Here, we show that the vast majority of patients already had potent neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 antibodies at hospital admission and with comparable titers to carefully selected plasma donors. This resulted in the decision to terminate the trial prematurely. Treatment with convalescent plasma should be studied early in the disease course or at least preceding autologous humoral response development.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Cytokines/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Blood Donors , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Disease Progression , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Treatment Outcome
7.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(3): 521-524, 2022 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228463

ABSTRACT

During COVID-19 lockdown, the in-hospital number of HIV indicator conditions decreased disproportionally compared with other non-COVID-19 diseases, which was accompanied by reduced HIV testing rates, number and proportion of positive HIV tests, and new HIV referrals, with more late presentation after lockdown cessation, indicating a significantly impacted HIV care continuum.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Communicable Disease Control , Continuity of Patient Care , HIV , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Hospitals , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
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