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1.
Public Health Nutr ; : 1-29, 2022 Mar 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758100

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: As older adults are at higher risk for severe illness and mortality from SARS-CoV-2 infection, social distancing has been a primary means of mitigating risk. However, this lifestyle change may impact eating habits and food choices. The aim of this study was to explore individual and interpersonal factors affecting the eating behaviors and dietary intake of community-dwelling older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Qualitative data were analyzed using a deductive content analysis approach to identify themes. SETTING: Southeastern United States. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-three men and women, 60 years of age and older (mean age 71.9 ± 7.7, 22% male) completed both the interview and questionnaire. RESULTS: Themes that emerged at the individual level included changes in eating habits and foods eaten, with most participants reporting healthier food choices during the pandemic. Participants also reported more frequent cooking, improved cooking skills, and cooking as a form of stress relief. Although some older adults described increased snacking and consumption of "comfort foods", others noted no influence of mood on food choices. At the interpersonal level, an increased use of technology for social interaction and the importance of social support were identified as influencing factors. CONCLUSIONS: Findings provide insight on how to help older adults maintain good nutrition amidst lifestyle changes imposed by social distancing. Nutrition educators may capitalize on positive behavior changes that occurred during the pandemic such as increased cooking and increased use of technology for social interaction.

2.
Telemed J E Health ; 27(7): 724-732, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575244

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Telephone-based telemedicine was temporarily permitted in Korea during the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of this study was to assess satisfaction with the telemedicine done during temporary hospital closing when in-person visits were not allowed due to in-hospital COVID-19 transmission. Methods: Survey questionnaires partially taken from a telehealth usability questionnaire (TUQ) were sent to 6,840 patients who used telephone-based telemedicine from February 24 to March 7, 2020. Questionnaires sent to patients and additionally created questionnaires to evaluate telemedicine were sent to medical staff (182 doctors and 138 nurses). Results: Response rates of patients and medical staff were 13.2% and 17.2%, respectively. Patients' satisfaction with telemedicine was significantly greater than medical staff's satisfaction for all five components taken from TUQ (all p = 0.000). In addition, created questionnaires showed good reliability, obtaining similar results between doctors and nurses (all p > 0.05). More than 85% of medical staff replied that telemedicine was needed in COVID-19, whereas more than 80% of them worried about incomplete assessment and communication of medical condition. Overall satisfaction with telemedicine by medical staff was 49.7%. The strength of telephone-based telemedicine was patients' convenience (53.4%). However, incomplete assessment of patients' condition (55.0%) was its weakness. Conclusion: Satisfaction with telephone-based telemedicine by patients was significantly greater than that by medical staff (doctors and nurses). Negative views for safety and inconvenience resulted in a greater proportion of dissatisfaction among medical staff. For safe application of telemedicine, medical staff insisted that developing a platform and creating guidelines should be needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Hospitals , Humans , Medical Staff , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Personal Satisfaction , Reproducibility of Results , Republic of Korea , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone
3.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(42): e295, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497009

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To minimize nosocomial infection against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), most hospitals conduct a prescreening process to evaluate the patient or guardian of any symptoms suggestive of COVID-19 or exposure to a COVID-19 patient at entrances of hospital buildings. In our hospital, we have implemented a two-level prescreening process in the outpatient clinic: an initial prescreening process at the entrance of the outpatient clinic (PPEO) and a second prescreening process is repeated in each department. If any symptoms or epidemiological history are identified at the second level, an emergency code is announced through the hospital's address system. The patient is then guided outside through a designated aisle. In this study, we analyze the cases missed in the PPEO that caused the emergency code to be applied. METHODS: All cases reported from March 2020 to April 2021 were analyzed retrospectively. We calculated the incidence of cases missed by the PPEO per 1,000 outpatients and compared the incidence between first-time hospital visitors and those visiting for the second time or more; morning and afternoon office hours; and days of the week. RESULTS: During the study period, the emergency code was applied to 449 cases missed by the PPEO. Among those cases, 20.7% were reported in otorhinolaryngology, followed by 11.6% in gastroenterology, 5.8% in urology, and 5.8% in dermatology. Fever was the most common symptom (59.9%), followed by cough (19.8%). The incidence of cases per 1,000 outpatients was significantly higher among first-time visitors than among those visiting for the second time or more (1.77 [confidence interval (CI), 1.44-2.10] vs. 0.59 [CI, 0.52-0.65], respectively) (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Fever was the most common symptom missed by the PPEO, and otorhinolaryngology and gastroenterology most frequently reported missed cases. Cases missed by the PPEO were more likely to occur among first-time visitors than returning visitors. The results obtained from this study can provide insights or recommendations to other healthcare facilities in operating prescreening processes during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cough/etiology , Fever/etiology , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ambulatory Care , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control , Male , Mass Screening/organization & administration , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Young Adult
4.
Journal of Nutrition Education & Behavior ; 53(7):S54-S55, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1297153

ABSTRACT

The ability to grocery shop is an important aspect of maintaining adequate nutritional status among older adults. During the COVID-19 pandemic, many older adults changed their typical grocery shopping habits attempting to remain safe. To understand how the COVID-19 pandemic influenced older adults' grocery shopping habits. In this qualitative study, a total of 23 older adults aged 60 years or older participated in individual interviews via Zoom. Data were analyzed using directed content analysis. Attempting to be cautious, most participants reported altering grocery shopping habits by shopping less frequently, using online services such as grocery pickup or delivery, or having friends or family members do the shopping. However, some participants continued shopping in stores due to poor quality produce items picked out by shoppers and safe policies implemented by stores. Also, grocery shopping in stores became incentivized as some participants viewed it as a form of entertainment, social interaction, and even physical activity during the pandemic. Although many stores offered senior shopping hours, the majority of study participants reported not using these services due to inconvenient times. Purchasing larger quantities of items and selecting more shelf stable, canned, and frozen items were also reported. Providing older adults with training and education on using online grocery shopping services may help this population have safe and simple access to healthy food items. In addition, training grocery store workers to pick out good quality produce may encourage more older adults to use these online services. Modifications to grocery store-instated senior hours should consider more convenient times to best support older adults. Because the grocery store emerged as an enjoyable place, it is especially crucial that grocery stores continue to enforce the policies that allow older adults to feel safe purchasing their groceries. Julie O'Sullivan Maillet Research Grant Award funded by The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation (ANDF). [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Nutrition Education & Behavior is the property of Elsevier B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

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