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1.
European Archives of Medical Research ; 38(1):48-55, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1744771

ABSTRACT

Objective: The current study predicts their clinical termination and the mortality rate at the end of the first-month with rapid scoring systems such as rapid emergency medicine score (REMS) and modified early warning score (MEWS) of Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) patients admitted to the emergency department. Methods: A total of 392 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 admitted to the emergency department in 1-month included in the study. REMS and MEWS were calculated for each case. Demographic data of patients, clinical outcomes [discharge, service or intensive care unit (ICU) hospitalization] and first-month mortality were analysed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine the cut-off value based on these scores. Results: The 1-month mortality rate of our patients was 4.3% (n=17). REMS was higher in the mortality of patients who are (7.24±3.77) with COVID-19 than survival (2.87±3.09), and there was a statistically significant difference between them (p<0.01). Similarly, the average of the MEWS was higher in the mortality of patients (2.76±1.86) than in patients who are survival (1.65±1.35), and there was a statistically significant difference (p<0.01). The REMS of patients admitted to the service was higher than that of patients discharged (p<0.01). When the REMS score was determined as 3 cut-off value in ROC analysis, service hospitalization was 5 times higher in patients with a REMS score of 3 and above than in those who were discharged (odds ratio: 1: 5.022 95% confidence interval: 3.088-8.168). Also, REMS and MEWS were higher in ICU patients than in discharged patients (p<0.01). Conclusion: In predicting the 1-month mortality of patients with ED diagnosed with COVID-19, REMS, and MEWS scoring systems can be useful and guiding in determining the patients who need hospitalization for emergency physicians. The use of these scoring systems in emergency departments can help predict the clinical outcomes of patients at the time of the initial evaluation and can also be a practical method for predicting the prognosis of the patients. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of European Archives of Medical Research is the property of Galenos Yayinevi Tic. LTD. STI and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

2.
European Archives of Medical Research ; 37(4):261-267, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1593820

ABSTRACT

Objective: The reversed halo sign (RHS) is a rare finding of chest computed tomography (CT) for coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia. This study aimed to examine the frequency and characteristics of RHS in chest CT examinations of patients with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-confirmed COVID-19, to evaluate the relationship between this finding and the clinical course, and to contribute to the differential diagnosis. Methods: Chest CT data of 1500 patients who had positive RT-PCR tests for suspected COVID-19 pneumonia between March 16, 2020, and April 26, 2020, were evaluated retrospectively. This study included 49 patients with RHS. Patients were classified into two groups as the hometreated group and hospitalized group. The number of RHS;their craniocaudal, lobar, and peripheral-central distribution;morphological features of the wall structure;change over time;and additional findings were evaluated. Results: Of the patients with RHS, 27 (55%) were treated at home, while 22 (45%) were treated in the hospital. The number of RHS lesions was higher in the hospitalized group. Lower zone involvement and predominance were common in both groups. The home-treated group mostly had oval-shaped lesions (44%), while oval- and round-shaped lesions were common in the hospitalized group (55%). The wall thickness of the reversed halo ring was greater in the hospitalized group. Incomplete ring morphology was common in both groups. Laboratory examinations showed a significant difference between the groups in terms of the monocyte counts and C-reactive protein and D-dimer levels (p=0.04, p=0.002, and p=0.023, respectively). Conclusion: RHS plays an important role in the differential diagnosis of COVID-19 pneumonia from other diseases based on its characteristic distribution pattern and morphological features. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of European Archives of Medical Research is the property of Galenos Yayinevi Tic. LTD. STI and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

3.
European Archives of Medical Research ; 37(3):173-177, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1431022

ABSTRACT

Objective: It is known that coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) can manifest with neurologic findings in addition to respiratory symptoms. This study aimed to investigate the rate of patients with COVID-19 who presented with a first epileptic seizure as a neurologic finding. Methods: The study included patients who presented to our hospital's emergency department reporting a seizure between March 11 and May 30, 2020. Of 90 patients, 32 (35.5%) presented first seizures. The patients' demographic characteristics, medical history, complications, the presence of risk factors relating to their treatment and seizures, laboratory findings, clinical properties, and imaging findings were recorded. Results: Of the patients with first seizures, 19 were men, and 13 were women. Their mean age was 49.5 (minimum: 18, maximum: 89) years. The percentage of patients with COVID-19 who presented with a first seizure was 31.2% (n=10). A risk factor was identified in 8 (80%) patients who presented with a first seizure, and no risk factor was found in 2 (20%) patients. In all patients, COVID-19 was diagnosed following a seizure presentation. The intensive care requirement rate was 30% (n=3), and 2 (20%) patients died. Conclusion: The rate of COVID-19 among patients presenting with a first seizure is high. It would be appropriate to consider patients arriving with a seizure without any other respiratory or systemic issues as being related to COVID-19 and plan the necessary analyses and treatment. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of European Archives of Medical Research is the property of Galenos Yayinevi Tic. LTD. STI and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

4.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(11): e14772, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388271

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic not only affected physical health but also caused high levels of mental health problems including sleep disturbances, depression and post-traumatic stress symptoms. The aim of this study was to examine the sleep parameters of healthcare workers before COVID-19 infection and after recovery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Healthcare workers who were infected with COVID-19 and whose treatment was completed at least 30 days ago were included in the study. A web-based cross-sectional survey was conducted on the participants. RESULTS: The median PSQI score increased significantly after COVID-19 infection (7.0) compared with the level before COVID-19 infection (5.0). The increases in median scores for subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep disturbance, use of sleeping medication and daytime dysfunction were all significant. CONCLUSION: Sleep quality decreased during the convalescence period from COVID-19 infection as compared with the pre-COVID-19 period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep
5.
Turkish Journal of Geriatrics-Turk Geriatri Dergisi ; 24(1):1-12, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1200503

ABSTRACT

Background: SARS-CoV-2 has caused an outbreak all over the World. Age is the most important factor for mortality. However, it is not known exactly why SARS-CoV-2 infections are more severe and fatal in the elderly population. We examined the clinical course and the causes of increasing mortality in all hospitalized patients diagnosed with COVID-19 over 65 years of age. Methods: Hospitalized elderly patients diagnosed with COVID-19 were examined in this retrospective observational study. The blood results, length of stay, comorbid diseases, admission symptoms, clinical results and demographic data of the patients were recorded. It was examined whether there was a significant difference between surviving and non-surviving patients in terms of comorbid diseases and symptoms. The effects of these parameters on the 30-day mortality alone were investigated. Results: A total of 263 patients (125 males) were included in the study. Cough (53.2%) followed by dyspnea (35.7%) were the two most common symptoms. There was no statistically significant difference age or sex distribution between survivor and nonsurvivor patients. Patients with dyspnea had a significantly lower survival rate compared to patients who did not have dyspnea at presentation and patients who have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cerebrovascular disease were associated with a significantly increased risk of mortality Conclusions: It has been shown that there is a significant increase in the risk of mortality in COVID-19 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cerebrovascular diseases. Additionally, Dyspnea, as an admission symptom, were found to have an effect on mortality and clinical outcomes in our study.

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