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1.
Medical Journal of Malaysia ; 76(6):881-883, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1627982

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted the medical world to look at factors that may influence outcomes. There have been connections made between vitamin D and COVID-19, as vitamin D has previously been shown to play a role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Materials and Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study on 103 patients at Wigan Wrightington and Leigh NHS Foundation Trust looking at serum vitamin D levels of patients with positive COVID-19 swabs. Results were collated and correlations were made to compare vitamin D levels with age;severity of illness;hospital outcomes;and frailty. Comparisons were also made between frailty and outcome.

2.
Medical Journal of Malaysia ; 76(6):881-883, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527207

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted the medical world to look at factors that may influence outcomes. There have been connections made between vitamin D and COVID-19, as vitamin D has previously been shown to play a role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a prospective cohort study on 103 patients at Wigan Wrightington and Leigh NHS Foundation Trust looking at serum vitamin D levels of patients with positive COVID-19 swabs. Results were collated and correlations were made to compare vitamin D levels with age;severity of illness;hospital outcomes;and frailty. Comparisons were also made between frailty and outcome. RESULTS: The results showed that there was a significant statistical difference between vitamin D levels and severity of infection: those who were treated in the intensive care units (ICU) (severe symptoms) had lower vitamin D levels than those treated on the ward (p=0.0446). There was also a correlation between vitamin D levels and frailty: those who were more frail had higher vitamin D levels than fitter patients (P=0.005). Vitamin D and frailty had no effect on hospital outcomes of COVID-19 infection. CONCLUSION: Ultimately, we concluded that low vitamin D can increase susceptibility of contracting COVID-19, increase severity of infection but does not affect mortality.

3.
Indian Journal of Public Health Research and Development ; 12(4):6-10, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1328471

ABSTRACT

Background: Poornima University, in collaboration with Jodhpur School of Public Health, hosted an insightful and interactive live global webinar on “Hepatitis Free Future” on 1st August 2020. Four speakers and six panellists addressed the current situation, preventive measures, and future directions for achieving the target of hepatitis elimination by 2030 Findings: Globally, Hepatitis B and C (HBV & HCV) accounts for 96% of all hepatitis mortality and more than 300 million people are living with viral hepatitis. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 1 in 3 people worldwide has been infected with either HBV or HCV.Global uptake in childhood vaccination is significant for HBV, but the birth dose for all infants is too low (nearly 39% percent). Despite vaccination, 1.8 billion 5-year-old get infected every year with HBV.Various programs and projects are contributing to the elimination of the Hepatitis to reach the international goal. Due to COVID-19 there would be setbacks however we have all the tools within our reach and we must use them to get elimination, most importantly deliver it to the people who need it the most, if we plan to succeed by 2030. Conclusion: Hepatitis claims the lives of millions of people globally each year.With prevention, treatment, diagnostics, and vaccination hepatitis elimination is attainable. Greater investment in eliminating hepatitis will generate higher long-term returns. We have the tools, treatments, and strategies to combat this infectious disease. We need the support of various sectors to execute the plan, proper implementation of the idea, training, and awareness to the public domain. With leadership, resources, and multi-stakeholder collaboration, elimination of viral hepatitis is achievable.

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