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1.
Clin Ophthalmol ; 15: 1041-1054, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140597

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study evaluated real-world treatment of dry eye disease (DED) with lifitegrast. Patients and Methods: Ophthalmologists and optometrists treating patients with DED were invited to participate through a healthcare provider (HCP)-based panel. HCPs completed a provider survey and contributed data toward a chart review for up to five qualifying patients with DED who initiated lifitegrast ophthalmic solution (index date) between 01/01/2017 (US) or 01/01/2018 (Canada) and 06/30/2019. Patient demographics, treatments, clinical characteristics, and outcomes (ie, severity, signs, symptoms) were collected for the 6-month pre-index period and up to 12-months post-index. Results: For this study, 517 HCPs contributed 600 patient charts. Among 554 and 281 patients with follow-up at 6 and 12-months post-index, 512 (92.4%) and 238 (84.7%) patients had ongoing lifitegrast treatment, respectively. Other DED-related treatments were less frequently used post-index with lifitegrast vs pre-index: over-the-counter artificial tear use (45.2% vs 75.5%), topical corticosteroids (3.8% vs 18.8%), any cyclosporine (3.0% vs 20.5%). At 3-months (n=571) and 12-months (n=320) post-index vs pre-index, fewer patients had eye dryness (47 [8.2%] and 16 [5.0%] vs 525 [87.5%]), blurred vision (28 [4.9%] and 11 [3.4%] vs 346 [57.7%]), ocular burning/stinging (25 [4.4%] and 8 [2.5%] vs 336 [56.0%]), depression (8 [1.4%] and 9 [2.8%] vs 55 [9.2%]), fatigue (4 [0.7%] and 1 [0.3%] vs 82 [13.7%]), and headache (1 [0.2%] and 0 vs 19 [3.2%]). At 3 and 12-months post-index vs pre-index, average corneal staining score was numerically lower (2.7 and 2.0 vs 6.5), and average Schirmer score (10.6 and 10 vs 6.3) and tear film break-up time (7.3 and 8.0 vs 4.8) higher. Conclusion: The majority of patients had ongoing lifitegrast treatment 6-months post-index with reduction in overall treatment burden. Improvement in DED signs and symptoms, including QoL impacts, was evident at 3 months and up to 12 months after lifitegrast initiation.

2.
Data Analytics in Bioinformatics ; n/a(n/a):293-311, 2021.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1033387

ABSTRACT

Summary The viruses are called as enteric viruses developed using ingestion termed as fecal oral transmission and is relicated using intestinal tract. Enteric viruses are genus Enterovirus phrased as Caliciviridae, Picoornaviridae, Coronaviride, Astroviridae, Orthoreovirus, genera Rotavirus, and Reoviridae phrase as Adenovirida and Reoviridae. Coronaviruses belong to the Coronaviridae family. It belongs to one of the Ribo-Nucleic Acid (RNA) families of the order Nidovirales, the others are pathegens of birds and insects of Arteriviridae and the Roniviridae families. The coronaviruses consists of single stranded RNA genome of 30kb in length in size. An epidemic of novel corona virus called as SARS-CoV-2 irritates the COVID- 19 disease is reported recently. It is enveloped, plus stranded RNA viruses with extra ordinarily large genomes and helical nucleocapsids. During the pandemic situations, it is necessary to predict Covid cases in advance to take the preventive measures and thus saving the human life and other living beings. To predict the count of Covid-19 in advance and to improve the accuracy, this chapter proposes Machine and Deep learning algorithms such as Long Short Term Memory (LSTM), eXtreme Gradient Boost (XG Boost) algorithms and polynomial regression for forecasting. The real time dataset is taken from Kaggle which contains around 36,000 samples. The sample is taken from around 187 countries from the world and the dataset contains the details which included from the month of January to May, 2020. The algorithm is tested using test dataset and the performance is evaluated through the performance metrics. Abstract Objectives Latino patients are overrepresented among cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and are at an increased risk for severe disease. Prevalence of COVID-19 in Latinos with rheumatic diseases are poorly reported. The purpose of this study was to characterize COVID-19 clinical features and outcomes in Latino patients with rheumatic diseases. Methods This is a retrospective study of Latino patients with rheumatic diseases from an existing observational cohort in the Washington, DC area. Patients seen between April 1 to October 15, 2020 were analyzed in this study. We reviewed demographics, body mass index (BMI), comorbidities, and immunomodulatory therapies. An exploratory Classification and Regression Tree (CART) analysis along with logistic regression (LR) analyses were performed to identify risk factors for COVID-19 and rheumatic disease flare. Results Out of 178 patients, 32 (18%) were identified with COVID-19 and the incidence rate of infection was found to be three-fold higher than the general Latino population. No patients required ICU level care. CART analysis and multivariable LR analysis identified BMI>30.35 as a risk factor for COVID-19 [P=0.004, OR=3.37, 95%CI (1.5-7.7)]. COVID-19 positivity was a risk factor for rheumatic disease flare [P=0.02, OR=4.57, 95%CI (1.2-17.4)]. Conclusion Latino patients with rheumatic diseases had a higher rate of COVID-19 compared with the general Latino population. Obesity was identified as a risk factor for COVID-19 and COVID-19 itself was found to be a risk factor for rheumatic disease flare. Latino patients with risk factors should be followed closely, especially post-COVID-19 in anticipation of disease flare.

3.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 73(7): 1129-1134, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1030669

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Latino patients are overrepresented among cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and are at an increased risk of severe disease. Prevalence of COVID-19 in Latinos with rheumatic diseases is poorly reported. This study was undertaken to characterize COVID-19 clinical features and outcomes in Latino patients with rheumatic diseases. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of Latino patients with rheumatic diseases from an existing observational cohort in the Washington, DC area. Patients seen between April 1, 2020 and October 15, 2020 were analyzed in this study. We reviewed demographic characteristics, body mass index (BMI), comorbidities, and use of immunomodulatory therapies. An exploratory classification and regression tree (CART) analysis along with logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors for COVID-19 and rheumatic disease flare. RESULTS: Of 178 Latino patients with rheumatic diseases, 32 (18%) were identified as having COVID-19, and the incidence rate of infection was found to be 3-fold higher than in the general Latino population. No patients required intensive care unit-level care. A CART analysis and multivariable logistic regression analysis identified a BMI of >30.35 as a risk factor for COVID-19 (odds ratio [OR] 3.37 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.5-7.7]; P = 0.004). COVID-19 positivity was a risk factor for rheumatic disease flare (OR 4.57 [95% CI 1.2-17.4]; P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that Latino patients with rheumatic diseases have a higher rate of COVID-19 compared with the general Latino population. Obesity is a risk factor for COVID-19, and COVID-19 is a risk factor for rheumatic disease flare. Latino patients with risk factors should be closely followed up, especially post-COVID-19 in anticipation of disease flare.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Rheumatic Diseases/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , United States
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