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1.
Cognitive Science and Technology ; : 27-42, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2173877

ABSTRACT

The number of people affected by the ongoing coronavirus has fluctuated rapidly and it has become strenuous to predict when will this pandemic end. To impede the spread of this virus, it is the need of the hour to maintain a social distance, wear masks and sanitize regularly. No doubt, the mortality rate has escalated, summing to a large percentage of population and destroying lives and economies with it. In India, mortality has climbed to as high as 3.2% as per the Indian Express, with recovery rate summing to 81.55% according to Times of India. Therefore, it has become prudent to determine and predict the effect and drawbacks of various factors such as testing, mortality rate and confirmed cases on the recovery rate. Due to progression and evolution in the discipline of machine learning, it has become practicable to get a middling figure of effects of these factors on death rate. Regression, one of the most broadly exhausted machine learning and statistics algorithm, is used to make predictions from data by learning the relationship between the features. In this article, regression algorithms are used to anticipate the same by using a cumulative data of all states in India. Study compares the ramification of the number of testing done and their impact on the recuperation of life due to the virus. Therefore, based on the research and computing, it was found that ridge regression gave the highest accuracy equivalent to 99.6%. © 2023, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

2.
Advanced Nanobiomed Research ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2172437

ABSTRACT

MXene-based nanomaterial is a revolution 2D material achieving outstanding scientific attention owing to its universal characteristics for different applications (such as electronic appliances, power production, sensors, drug transfer, and biomedical). Although, the cytotoxic consequences of MXene have a considerable circumstance. Thus, rigorous investigation of the biocompatibility of MXene is a crucial prerequisite, formerly the preface to the human biological approach. Literature reveals functional outcomes wherever MXenes are used in vitro and in vivo cancer representatives. It affects drug transfer methods, sensoring electrodes, and assisting mechanisms for photothermal treatment and hyperthermy techniques. In this review, the synthesis process (such as top-down and bottom-up approaches) and properties (such as mechanical, electrical, optical, oxidative/thermal stability, and magnetic) of MXene-based nanomaterials (NMs) are discussed. In addition, the different applications (such as tissue engineering, cancer theranostic, and other biomedical [such as drug delivery biosensors and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrates for biomedical applications], antiviral, and immunomodulatory properties against SARS-CoV-2) of MXene-based NMs are discussed in detail. Finally, the conclusion, existing challenges, and future outlooks are highlighted for more scope in this field.

3.
Medical Journal of Malaysia ; 77(Supplement 4):80, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2147656

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Malaysia experienced a surge in the number of active COVID-19 cases. As a result, the government came out with several measures and standard operating procedures to manage the COVID-19 pandemic. One of the most significant measures is by allowing the sale of COVID-19 self-test kits. This enables the public to do a self-test when they are close contacts or exhibiting symptoms. It enables immediate self-quarantine when found positive. This will restrict the spread of the COVID- 19 virus. Community pharmacies around the country have been in the forefront in selling the COVID-19 self-test kits. Their accessibility and role in counselling has made community pharmacists as an important figure in selling and counselling the public on the sale and use of COVID-19 self-test kits. Objective(s): The objective of the study is to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and perspectives of community pharmacists in the sale of COVID-19 self-test kits in Ipoh, Perak. Material(s) and Method(s): A cross-sectional survey study design was used to conduct this study. It was carried out via an online structured questionnaire distributed among the community pharmacists in Ipoh, Perak. 62 community pharmacists in Ipoh responded to this survey. Result(s) and Conclusion(s): It was found that 88.71% of the respondents have a good knowledge about the COVID-19 self-test kits. Around 58% of them portrayed a moderate attitude while selling the COVID-19 self-test kits, which included the demonstration and counselling. Whereas 58.2% of the community pharmacists showed moderate level of perspective while selling COVID-19 self-test kits sales. There is a need for the community pharmacists to undergo more training on COVID-19 self-test kits to improve their level of attitude and perspective when they sell the kits to the public. This will improve the management of the COVID-19 pandemic in the country.

5.
International Journal of Noncommunicable Diseases ; 6(5):98-101, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2071985

ABSTRACT

India, being the biggest producer of drugs including vaccines, emerged as a major supplier of the coronavirus vaccines for most of the countries across the world during the COVID-19 pandemic. Two vaccines, Covishield and Covaxin, were given emergency use authorization by India's drugs regulator during initial phases. Under the guidance of the National Expert Group on Vaccine Administration for COVID-19, India started its national vaccination program against SARS-CoV-2 on January 16, 2021. CoWIN (COVID-19 Vaccine Intelligence Network) is playing a vital role in real-time monitoring of COVID-19 vaccination. Having a robust Universal Immunization Program and experience of the previous immunization campaigns are advantages for India's COVID-19 vaccination program. Under Vaccine Maitri initiative, India is providing vaccines to nations across the world to ensure vaccine equity. In India, vaccination is being done in a phased manner where priority is given to the health and other frontline workers, people with age >50 years and people with comorbidities and above 18 years. As per the current policy, center government is responsible for buying 75% of all vaccines made for use in India and will distribute it to states based on their populations, disease burdens, and number of people to be vaccinated. Remaining 25% vaccines are available to be procured by private hospitals. However, existing facilities seem to be unable to meet the increased demand, and the government is considering approval for other vaccines to be imported. The world, including India, is still fighting against COVID-19 and vaccine equity is very important to win against this pandemic.

6.
Tran, K. B.; Lang, J. J.; Compton, K.; Xu, R. X.; Acheson, A. R.; Henrikson, H. J.; Kocarnik, J. M.; Penberthy, L.; Aali, A.; Abbas, Q.; Abbasi, B.; Abbasi-Kangevari, M.; Abbasi-Kangevari, Z.; Abbastabar, H.; Abdelmasseh, M.; Abd-Elsalam, S.; Abdelwahab, A. A.; Abdoli, G.; Abdulkadir, H. A.; Abedi, A.; Abegaz, K. H.; Abidi, H.; Aboagye, R. G.; Abolhassani, H.; Absalan, A.; Abtew, Y. D.; Ali, H. A.; Abu-Gharbieh, E.; Achappa, B.; Acuna, J. M.; Addison, D.; Addo, I. Y.; Adegboye, O. A.; Adesina, M. A.; Adnan, M.; Adnani, Q. E. S.; Advani, S. M.; Afrin, S.; Afzal, M. S.; Aggarwal, M.; Ahinkorah, B. O.; Ahmad, A. R.; Ahmad, R.; Ahmad, S.; Ahmadi, S.; Ahmed, H.; Ahmed, L. A.; Ahmed, M. B.; Rashid, T. A.; Aiman, W.; Ajami, M.; Akalu, G. T.; Akbarzadeh-Khiavi, M.; Aklilu, A.; Akonde, M.; Akunna, C. J.; Al Hamad, H.; Alahdab, F.; Alanezi, F. M.; Alanzi, T. M.; Alessy, S. A.; Algammal, A. M.; Al-Hanawi, M. K.; Alhassan, R. K.; Ali, B. A.; Ali, L.; Ali, S. S.; Alimohamadi, Y.; Alipour, V.; Aljunid, S. M.; Alkhayyat, M.; Al-Maweri, S. A. A.; Almustanyir, S.; Alonso, N.; Alqalyoobi, S.; Al-Raddadi, R. M.; Al-Rifai, R. H. H.; Al-Sabah, S. K.; Al-Tammemi, A. B.; Altawalah, H.; Alvis-Guzman, N.; Amare, F.; Ameyaw, E. K.; Dehkordi, J. J. A.; Amirzade-Iranaq, M. H.; Amu, H.; Amusa, G. A.; Ancuceanu, R.; Anderson, J. A.; Animut, Y. A.; Anoushiravani, A.; Anoushirvani, A. A.; Ansari-Moghaddam, A.; Ansha, M. G.; Antony, B.; Antwi, M. H.; Anwar, S. L.; Anwer, R.; Anyasodor, A. E.; Arabloo, J.; Arab-Zozani, M.; Aremu, O.; Argaw, A. M.; Ariffin, H.; Aripov, T.; Arshad, M.; Al, Artaman, Arulappan, J.; Aruleba, R. T.; Aryannejad, A.; Asaad, M.; Asemahagn, M. A.; Asemi, Z.; Asghari-Jafarabadi, M.; Ashraf, T.; Assadi, R.; Athar, M.; Athari, S. S.; Null, Mmwa, Attia, S.; Aujayeb, A.; Ausloos, M.; Avila-Burgos, L.; Awedew, A. F.; Awoke, M. A.; Awoke, T.; Quintanilla, B. P. A.; Ayana, T. M.; Ayen, S. S.; Azadi, D.; Null, S. A.; Azami-Aghdash, S.; Azanaw, M. M.; Azangou-Khyavy, M.; Jafari, A. A.; Azizi, H.; Azzam, A. Y. Y.; Babajani, A.; Badar, M.; Badiye, A. D.; Baghcheghi, N.; Bagheri, N.; Bagherieh, S.; Bahadory, S.; Baig, A. A.; Baker, J. L.; Bakhtiari, A.; Bakshi, R. K.; Banach, M.; Banerjee, I.; Bardhan, M.; Barone-Adesi, F.; Barra, F.; Barrow, A.; Bashir, N. Z.; Bashiri, A.; Basu, S.; Batiha, A. M. M.; Begum, A.; Bekele, A. B.; Belay, A. S.; Belete, M. A.; Belgaumi, U. I.; Bell, A. W.; Belo, L.; Benzian, H.; Berhie, A. Y.; Bermudez, A. N. C.; Bernabe, E.; Bhagavathula, A. S.; Bhala, N.; Bhandari, B. B.; Bhardwaj, N.; Bhardwaj, P.; Bhattacharyya, K.; Bhojaraja, V. S.; Bhuyan, S. S.; Bibi, S.; Bilchut, A. H.; Bintoro, B. S.; Biondi, A.; Birega, M. G. B.; Birhan, H. E.; Bjorge, T.; Blyuss, O.; Bodicha, B. B. A.; Bolla, S. R.; Boloor, A.; Bosetti, C.; Braithwaite, D.; Brauer, M.; Brenner, H.; Briko, A. N.; Briko, N. I.; Buchanan, C. M.; Bulamu, N. B.; Bustamante-Teixeira, M. T.; Butt, M. H.; Butt, N. S.; Butt, Z. A.; dos Santos, F. L. C.; Camera, L. A.; Cao, C.; Cao, Y.; Carreras, G.; Carvalho, M.; Cembranel, F.; Cerin, E.; Chakraborty, P. A.; Charalampous, P.; Chattu, V. K.; Chimed-Ochir, O.; Chirinos-Caceres, J. L.; Cho, D. Y.; Cho, W. C. S.; Christopher, D. J.; Chu, D. T.; Chukwu, I. S.; Cohen, A. J.; Conde, J.; Cortas, S.; Costa, V. M.; Cruz-Martins, N.; Culbreth, G. T.; Dadras, O.; Dagnaw, F. T.; Dahlawi, S. M. A.; Dai, X. C.; Dandona, L.; Dandona, R.; Daneshpajouhnejad, P.; Danielewicz, A.; Dao, A. T. M.; Soltani, R. D. C.; Darwesh, A. M.; Das, S.; Davitoiu, D. V.; Esmaeili, E. D.; De la Hoz, F. P.; Debela, S. A.; Dehghan, A.; Demisse, B.; Demisse, F. W.; Denova-Gutierrez, E.; Derakhshani, A.; Molla, M. D.; Dereje, D.; Deribe, K. S.; Desai, R.; Desalegn, M. D.; Dessalegn, F. N.; Dessalegni, S. A. A.; Dessie, G.; Desta, A. A.; Dewan, S. M. R.; Dharmaratne, S. D.; Dhimal, M.; Dianatinasab, M.; Diao, N.; Diaz, D.; Digesa, L. E.; Dixit, S. G.; Doaei, S.; Doan, L. P.; Doku, P. N.; Dongarwar, D.; dos Santos, W. M.; Driscoll, T. R.; Dsouza, H. L.; Durojaiye, O. C.; Edalati, S.; Eghbalian, F.; Ehsani-Chimeh, E.; Eini, E.; Ekholuenetale, M.; Ekundayo, T. C.; Ekwueme, D. U.; El Tantawi, M.; Elbahnasawy, M. A.; Elbarazi, I.; Elghazaly, H.; Elhadi, M.; El-Huneidi, W.; Emamian, M. H.; Bain, L. E.; Enyew, D. B.; Erkhembayar, R.; Eshetu, T.; Eshrati, B.; Eskandarieh, S.; Espinosa-Montero, J.; Etaee, F.; Etemadimanesh, A.; Eyayu, T.; Ezeonwumelu, I. J.; Ezzikouri, S.; Fagbamigbe, A. F.; Fahimi, S.; Fakhradiyev, I. R.; Faraon, E. J. A.; Fares, J.; Farmany, A.; Farooque, U.; Farrokhpour, H.; Fasanmi, A. O.; Fatehizadeh, A.; Fatima, W.; Fattahi, H.; Fekadu, G.; Feleke, B. E.; Ferrari, A. A.; Ferrero, S.; Desideri, L. F.; Filip, I.; Fischer, F.; Foroumadi, R.; Foroutan, M.; Fukumoto, T.; Gaal, P. A.; Gad, M. M.; Gadanya, M. A.; Gaipov, A.; Galehdar, N.; Gallus, S.; Garg, T.; Fonseca, M. G.; Gebremariam, Y. H.; Gebremeskel, T. G.; Gebremichael, M. A.; Geda, Y. F.; Gela, Y. Y.; Gemeda, B. N. B.; Getachew, M.; Getachew, M. E.; Ghaffari, K.; Ghafourifard, M.; Ghamari, S. H.; Nour, M. G.; Ghassemi, F.; Ghimire, A.; Ghith, N.; Gholamalizadeh, M.; Navashenaq, J. G.; Ghozy, S.; Gilani, S. A.; Gill, P. S.; Ginindza, T. G.; Gizaw, A. T. T.; Glasbey, J. C.; Godos, J.; Goel, A.; Golechha, M.; Goleij, P.; Golinelli, D.; Golitaleb, M.; Gorini, G.; Goulart, B. N. G.; Grosso, G.; Guadie, H. A.; Gubari, M. I. M.; Gudayu, T. W.; Guerra, M. R.; Gunawardane, D. A.; Gupta, B.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, V.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurara, M. K.; Guta, A.; Habibzadeh, P.; Avval, A. H.; Hafezi-Nejad, N.; Ali, A. H.; Haj-Mirzaian, A.; Halboub, E. S.; Halimi, A.; Halwani, R.; Hamadeh, R. R.; Hameed, S.; Hamidi, S.; Hanif, A.; Hariri, S.; Harlianto, N. I.; Haro, J. M.; Hartono, R. K.; Hasaballah, A. I.; Hasan, S. M. M.; Hasani, H.; Hashemi, S. M.; Hassan, A. M.; Hassanipour, S.; Hayat, K.; Heidari, G.; Heidari, M.; Heidarymeybodi, Z.; Herrera-Serna, B. Y.; Herteliu, C.; Hezam, K.; Hiraike, Y.; Hlongwa, M. M.; Holla, R.; Holm, M.; Horita, N.; Hoseini, M.; Hossain, M. M.; Hossain, M. B. H.; Hosseini, M. S.; Hosseinzadeh, A.; Hosseinzadeh, M.; Hostiuc, M.; Hostiuc, S.; Househ, M.; Huang, J. J.; Hugo, F. N.; Humayun, A.; Hussain, S.; Hussein, N. R.; Hwang, B. F.; Ibitoye, S. E.; Iftikhar, P. M.; Ikuta, K. S.; Ilesanmi, O. S.; Ilic, I. M.; Ilic, M. D.; Immurana, M.; Innos, K.; Iranpour, P.; Irham, L. M.; Islam, M. S.; Islam, R. M.; Islami, F.; Ismail, N. E.; Isola, G.; Iwagami, M.; Merin, J. L.; Jaiswal, A.; Jakovljevic, M.; Jalili, M.; Jalilian, S.; Jamshidi, E.; Jang, S. I.; Jani, C. T.; Javaheri, T.; Jayarajah, U. U.; Jayaram, S.; Jazayeri, S. B.; Jebai, R.; Jemal, B.; Jeong, W.; Jha, R. P.; Jindal, H. A.; John-Akinola, Y. O.; Jonas, J. B.; Joo, T.; Joseph, N.; Joukar, F.; Jozwiak, J. J.; Jarisson, M.; Kabir, A.; Kacimi, S. E. O.; Kadashetti, V.; Kahe, F.; Kakodkar, P. V.; Kalankesh, L. R.; Kalhor, R.; Kamal, V. K.; Kamangar, F.; Kamath, A.; Kanchan, T.; Kandaswamy, E.; Kandel, H.; Kang, H.; Kanno, G. G.; Kapoor, N.; Kar, S. S.; Karanth, S. D.; Karaye, I. M.; Karch, A.; Karimi, A.; Kassa, B. G.; Katoto, Pdmc, Kauppila, J. H.; Kaur, H.; Kebede, A. G.; Keikavoosi-Arani, L.; Kejela, G. G.; Bohan, P. M. K.; Keramati, M.; Keykhaei, M.; Khajuria, H.; Khan, A.; Khan, A. A. K.; Khan, E. A.; Khan, G.; Khan, M. N.; Ab Khan, M.; Khanali, J.; Khatab, K.; Khatatbeh, M. M.; Khatib, M. N.; Khayamzadeh, M.; Kashani, H. R. K.; Tabari, M. A. K.; et al..
Lancet ; 400(10352):563-591, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2068419

ABSTRACT

Background Understanding the magnitude of cancer burden attributable to potentially modifiable risk factors is crucial for development of effective prevention and mitigation strategies. We analysed results from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) 2019 to inform cancer control planning efforts globally. Methods The GBD 2019 comparative risk assessment framework was used to estimate cancer burden attributable to behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risk factors. A total of 82 risk-outcome pairs were included on the basis of the World Cancer Research Fund criteria. Estimated cancer deaths and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) in 2019 and change in these measures between 2010 and 2019 are presented. Findings Globally, in 2019, the risk factors included in this analysis accounted for 4.45 million (95% uncertainty interval 4.01-4.94) deaths and 105 million (95.0-116) DALYs for both sexes combined, representing 44.4% (41.3-48.4) of all cancer deaths and 42.0% (39.1-45.6) of all DALYs. There were 2.88 million (2.60-3.18) risk-attributable cancer deaths in males (50.6% [47.8-54.1] of all male cancer deaths) and 1.58 million (1.36-1.84) risk-attributable cancer deaths in females (36.3% [32.5-41.3] of all female cancer deaths). The leading risk factors at the most detailed level globally for risk-attributable cancer deaths and DALYs in 2019 for both sexes combined were smoking, followed by alcohol use and high BMI. Risk-attributable cancer burden varied by world region and Socio-demographic Index (SDI), with smoking, unsafe sex, and alcohol use being the three leading risk factors for risk-attributable cancer DALYs in low SDI locations in 2019, whereas DALYs in high SDI locations mirrored the top three global risk factor rankings. From 2010 to 2019, global risk-attributable cancer deaths increased by 20.4% (12.6-28.4) and DALYs by 16.8% (8.8-25.0), with the greatest percentage increase in metabolic risks (34.7% [27.9-42.8] and 33.3% [25.8-42.0]). Interpretation The leading risk factors contributing to global cancer burden in 2019 were behavioural, whereas metabolic risk factors saw the largest increases between 2010 and 2019. Reducing exposure to these modifiable risk factors would decrease cancer mortality and DALY rates worldwide, and policies should be tailored appropriately to local cancer risk factor burden. Copyright (C) 2022 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0 license.

7.
Clinical Infection in Practice ; 15, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2041624

ABSTRACT

Background: The Covid-19 pandemic risks disruption to diagnosis and treatment of Tuberculosis (TB) globally, jeopardising the 2035 eradication target. Between 1990-2010 40.9% of contacts did not complete Tuberculosis (TB) contact screening in Birmingham, UK. Understanding screening outcome success is urgently needed to guide future resource allocation. Aim: To evaluate changes made to TB screening since 2010. To identify predictors of contact screening non-completion, and of screening outcomes. Methods: A retrospective cohort analysis of all index and contact patients in Birmingham between 2011-2020, with separation of Covid-19 data, and stratification of contacts by Pulmonary TB (PTB) or Extra-Pulmonary TB (EPTB) index infection. Univariate and multiple logistic regression models were used to identify predictors of screening completion and clinical outcome. Results: 3,255 index cases and 27,820 contacts were identified. Screening non-completion has improved from 40.9% of contacts to 25% since 2010. Contacts were less likely to complete screening if they were >65 years (P=0.001) had no BCG (P<0.001), were male (P<0.001 PTB, P=0.02 EPTB), had had TB themselves (P<0.001 PTB, P=0.025 EPTB), were a close contact (P<0.001), or were from the Indian subcontinent (PTB only, P=0.019). Contacts were significantly more likely to require treatment for TB if they were born outside the UK (P<0.001), were <65 years (P<0.001 PTB, P=0.01 EPTB), if they were male, close contacts, or of Black ethnicity (all P=0.001, PTB only). Conclusions: Changes to contact screening since 2010 have substantially improved screening completion rates. Significant predictors of screening non-completion exist, which warrant further investigation and targeted screening support.

8.
Journal of Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences University ; 17(5):S173-S174, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2040170
9.
National Journal of Community Medicine ; 13(8):578-579, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2026903

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has caused disruptions in carrying out research activities in the field. The established methods of data collection for both qualitative and quantitative research could not be implemented. Researchers worldwide adopted contactless data collection methods, including the use of mobile phones for research purposes. This paper presents the experiences of conducting interviews among tribal population using mobile phones in three villages of Manipur during the pandemic. The interviews proved to be successful and effective. Minor technical glitches were a challenge but were not significant to affect the quality of the data. During unprecedented times such as the current pandemic, conducting interviews via mobile phones could be a viable alternative to face-to-face interviews for collecting qualitative data from the communities. © The Authors retain.

10.
Asia-Pacific Education Researcher ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2003769

ABSTRACT

Student engagement is a critical component of e-learning, which became an important focus for most academic institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic. University students' engagement is measured using various scales with different subscales. This study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Persian version of the University Student Engagement Inventory (P-USEI). A cross-sectional methodology study was conducted among Iranian university students (n = 667) from April to May 2020. After forward-backward translation, the content, and construct validity, and reliability of the scale were assessed. The results obtained from the confirmatory factor analysis confirmed that the P-USEI has three factors: cognitive, emotional, and behaviour. The findings of the study supported the adequate reliability, factorial, convergent, and discriminant validities of P-USEI in a sample of Iranian students. The P-USEI dimensions have predictive value for important academic variables that can be generalized by developing the research through a psychometric evaluation on student engagement.

11.
National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology ; 12(8):1233-1240, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1988325

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to the unprecedented magnitude of the current Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, vaccine development was fast-tracked;yet, there were barriers to vaccination uptake. Aim and Objectives: The objectives of this study were to understand the factors promoting vaccination and the barriers to vaccination, to explore the infection prevention and control practices followed after vaccination. Materials and Methods: A qualitative study using in depth interviews, both face to face and telephonic;among beneficiaries willing to participate and given at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine in the institutions’ vaccination center, stratified sampling technique was used. Informed consent was obtained. Absolute confidentiality was ensured. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and validated by back translation into vernacular. The results obtained were analyzed using framework approach and categorized into themes and subthemes and valid conclusions drawn. Results: Various factors promoting willingness for vaccination and barriers perceived by the participants in their community, social, and occupational setting have been revealed in the present study. Availability of vaccine along with clear and accurate information can go a long way in overcoming vaccine hesitancy and promoting vaccine literacy. Conclusion: Clear and accurate information should be disseminated. The role of social media, mass media, and dissemination of information by word of mouth cannot be undermined. It is hoped that results of the present study will aid in formulating future vaccination programs.

12.
National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology ; 12(8):1197-1201, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1988323

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) was identified as a cause of a disease outbreak in 2019 that originated in China. An infection without a cure makes the people, especially health care workers more vulnerable to get affected because of insufficient knowledge and unhealthy practices. Aim and Objective: This study aims to assess the knowledge and perceptions among medical students. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted from December 2020 to February 2021 among the undergraduates and interns. The study was adapted from the current interim guidelines and information provided by Ministry Health and Family Welfare, Government of India (MOHFW, GOI) and Indian Council of Medical Research. Results: There were a total 355 participants. The majority (90.4%) of students had adequate knowledge. Only 9.5% had partial or no knowledge, the majority >90% of them showed a positive perception of COVID-19 prevention and control. In fact, majority 98.30% of students also got vaccinated against COVID-19. Conclusion: As there is no specific cure against COVID-19, it is essential to improve knowledge and belief among general public to prevent the spread. Medical students can, therefore, play a significant role by making community people aware about the seriousness of this pandemic.

13.
Indian Journal of Community Health ; 34(2):289-293, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1975879

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The Emergence of new Delta strain of Corona virus has created havoc with all health care systems across the globe, there has been tremendous pressure due to shortage of health care workers forcing government to involve MBBS interns to overcome the shortage of health staff in Covid care. Aims & Objectives: To assess magnitude of anxiety, stress and depression among MBBS interns working in Covid Isolation facility of Government Medical College, Patiala. Material and methods: The Google form was created and the link to the online questionnaire was circulated through whatsapp group to the MBBS Interns working in Covid isolation facility during June to July 2021. The form included two instruments the Perceived Stress Scale-4 (PSS-4) and the Patient Health Questionnaire for Depression and Anxiety-4 (PHQ-4). Results: A total of 144 interns participated in the survey.Patient Health Questionnaires and Perceived Stress Scale-4 (PSS-4) scores of interns were 56% and 49% respectively. Anxiety and depression symptoms requiring further evaluation were seen in 19% of the Interns. Univariate analysis of PHQ-4 and PSS-4 shows statistically significant association with past history of psychiatric ailment.Conclusion: Careful monitoring of psychological and mental wellbeing of interns during the pandemic will go a long way in mitigating the worsening psychological wellbeing of budding doctors and interns. © 2022, Indian Association of Preventive and Social Medicine. All rights reserved.

14.
Studies in Computational Intelligence ; 1023:211-226, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1930300

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a disease that is caused by a new virus, coronavirus, which first appeared in China and a few months;it spread all over the globe, infecting many people. This disease shows very common symptoms like fever, cough, and tiredness, which makes it more difficult to know if the person is infected or not. There have been a lot of struggles in finding a way to detect the virus in a human body and manage the infected at the same time. There is an immense increase in the number of infected cases, so it becomes difficult to manage patients with proper resources and medical facilities, leading to an increase in casualties. To overcome the difficulty, this study proposes fast and efficient methods for the detection of the virus and proper treatment. COVID-19 patient management and triaging means accurately identifying patients or detecting COVID-19 and categorizing the patients or sorting them accordingly for their proper management. This study aims to help the government and health care system take relevant steps to detect and manage COVID-19 patients. Also, with the details and symptoms of the infected person, we can categorize the person as a mild, critical, or severe case. The proposed methods in the chapter have shown promised results while testing on COVID CT Scan Images and patients’ symptoms dataset. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

15.
Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology ; 16:18, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1886894

ABSTRACT

While most studies have been reporting the psychological issues being faced by the public due to the global spread of coronavirus and sudden restrictions and changes accompanying it, the present study attempted to explore dynamic human experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic and resultant lockdown, so as to understand the psycho-social factors that acted as adaptive resources or as buffers to maintain a stable mental state amidst this crisis. In-depth telephonic interviews with 30 participants were conducted to explore their experiences in dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown. Thematic analysis performed to identify the positive and protective factors that helped people adapt in a healthy way revealed that although the initial response of the participants to the pandemic was "optimistic bias" followed by downplaying the seriousness of the issue, later they demonstrated increased realization and acceptance to the seriousness of the situation. Upon realizing the situation, their positive psychological resources acted as a buffer against the ill effects of the pandemic, and they used both cognitive and behavioral coping. The study clearly demonstrates that crisis in life is not just a source of stress, anxiety, and uncertainty but also an opportunity to test one's psychological resources to learn and grow.

16.
Indian Veterinary Journal ; 98(12):22-29, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1820592

ABSTRACT

Spike (S) proteins covering the outer surface of the Coronaviruses are the major hotspots of evolution and are also responsible for attaching the virus to the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE2) receptor on the host cells. In this study, we unveiled the evolutionary relics of the S-protein sequences of different beta Coronaviruses, namely, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV), SARS-CoV-2, and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERSCoV). The present study aims at exploring the sequence divergence of the spike protein (S-protein) of nCov2 viruses to illuminate the evolutionary process. The nucleotide sequences of S-proteins of nCov2 viruses, namely, SARS, MERS and SARS-CoV2, representing different continents of the world, were downloaded from the NCBI Nucleotide databases. The conserved regions have been depicted through multiple sequence alignment (Clustal Omega, Jalview) and the molecular phylogeny has been studied. (using MEGA 7). Comparative analysis of the pairwise distance and selection pressure indicated that the SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 are close to each other, however, distantly related to MERS-CoV and the SARS-CoV2 could have evolved from SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome).

17.
Indian Journal of Respiratory Care ; 11(1):59-63, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1810697

ABSTRACT

This article aims to present the spectrum of pulmonary fungal infections observed in postcoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) diabetic patients. In this case series, three post-COVID-19 diabetic patients with poor glycemic control were diagnosed with pulmonary mucormycosis, invasive candidiasis, and pulmonary aspergillosis, respectively. The patients were subjected to clinical, radiological evaluation, including bronchoscopy. The etiologic agents were isolated in these cases and identified by biopsy and subsequent histopathological confirmation. A high index of suspicion, early use of appropriate diagnostic methods aided with suitable antifungal agents, and control of risk factors such as diabetes mellitus are the main factors governing the successful management of fungal infections in post-COVID-19 immune-suppressed patients, presenting with worsening respiratory symptoms.

18.
Journal of Association of Physicians of India ; 70(3):87-88, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1787252

ABSTRACT

Spontaneous pneumomediastinum is a rare diagnosis. A thirty-five-year-old female who was admitted to our hospital with fever, cough and breathlessness and positive RT-PCR for COVID-19 was diagnosed with spontaneous pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax. She was managed with symptomatic approach and oxygen therapy. Small pneumomediastinum usually requires close monitoring and follows an uneventful course. © 2022 Journal of Association of Physicians of India. All rights reserved.

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