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1.
Am J Orthopsychiatry ; 93(2): 144-155, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2185602

ABSTRACT

Refugees and asylum seekers in contexts of sustained displacement represent particularly vulnerable communities during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this study was to identify profiles of COVID-19 stressors in refugees in a transit context (i.e., Indonesia) and examine the relationship between these profiles of stressors and mental health and well-being. Participants in this study included 913 refugees and asylum seekers living in Indonesia. The study was completed online in five languages (i.e., Arabic, Dari, Farsi, Somali, and English). A latent class analysis was implemented with 12 COVID-19 stressors representing indicator variables to identify profiles of COVID-19-related stressors experienced. Associations between COVID-19 classes and mental health (posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety) and well-being (physical and mental) outcomes were investigated. A five-class solution was identified as providing the best fit to the data as follows: (a) a high-COVID stressors class (18.1%), (b) a high access stressors class (13.2%), (c) an infection stressors class (22.7%), (d) a moderate access stressors class (23.1%), and (e) a low-COVID stressors class (22.8%). Membership of all classes reporting at least moderate levels of COVID-19 stressors was associated with greater mental health difficulties and lower physical and mental well-being than the low-COVID stressors class. Results indicated that the severity and type of stressors differed between groups suggesting heterogeneous experiences of the pandemic. Classes also differed according to contextual and social factors such as negative social support, language, and geographic area. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Refugees , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , Mental Health , Refugees/psychology , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology
2.
Genes (Basel) ; 13(4)2022 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834773

ABSTRACT

Inherited retinal degenerations (IRDs) account for over one third of the underlying causes of blindness in the paediatric population. Patients with IRDs often experience long delays prior to reaching a definitive diagnosis. Children attending a tertiary care paediatric ophthalmology department with phenotypic (i.e., clinical and/or electrophysiologic) evidence suggestive of IRD were contacted for genetic testing during the SARS-CoV-2-19 pandemic using a "telegenetics" approach. Genetic testing approach was panel-based next generation sequencing (351 genes) via a commercial laboratory (Blueprint Genetics, Helsinki, Finland). Of 70 patient samples from 57 pedigrees undergoing genetic testing, a causative genetic variant(s) was detected for 60 patients (85.7%) from 47 (82.5%) pedigrees. Of the 60 genetically resolved IRD patients, 5% (n = 3) are eligible for approved therapies (RPE65) and 38.3% (n = 23) are eligible for clinical trial-based gene therapies including CEP290 (n = 2), CNGA3 (n = 3), CNGB3 (n = 6), RPGR (n = 5) and RS1 (n = 7). The early introduction of genetic testing in the diagnostic/care pathway for children with IRDs is critical for genetic counselling of these families prior to upcoming gene therapy trials. Herein, we describe the pathway used, the clinical and genetic findings, and the therapeutic implications of the first systematic coordinated round of genetic testing of a paediatric IRD cohort in Ireland.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Retinal Degeneration , Antigens, Neoplasm , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Child , Cytoskeletal Proteins/genetics , Electrophysiology , Eye Proteins/genetics , Genetic Testing , Humans , Retinal Degeneration/diagnosis , Retinal Degeneration/genetics , Retinal Degeneration/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Genes ; 13(4):615, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1762760

ABSTRACT

Inherited retinal degenerations (IRDs) account for over one third of the underlying causes of blindness in the paediatric population. Patients with IRDs often experience long delays prior to reaching a definitive diagnosis. Children attending a tertiary care paediatric ophthalmology department with phenotypic (i.e., clinical and/or electrophysiologic) evidence suggestive of IRD were contacted for genetic testing during the SARS-CoV-2-19 pandemic using a 'telegenetics';approach. Genetic testing approach was panel-based next generation sequencing (351 genes) via a commercial laboratory (Blueprint Genetics, Helsinki, Finland). Of 70 patient samples from 57 pedigrees undergoing genetic testing, a causative genetic variant(s) was detected for 60 patients (85.7%) from 47 (82.5%) pedigrees. Of the 60 genetically resolved IRD patients, 5% (n = 3) are eligible for approved therapies (RPE65) and 38.3% (n = 23) are eligible for clinical trial-based gene therapies including CEP290 (n = 2), CNGA3 (n = 3), CNGB3 (n = 6), RPGR (n = 5) and RS1 (n = 7). The early introduction of genetic testing in the diagnostic/care pathway for children with IRDs is critical for genetic counselling of these families prior to upcoming gene therapy trials. Herein, we describe the pathway used, the clinical and genetic findings, and the therapeutic implications of the first systematic coordinated round of genetic testing of a paediatric IRD cohort in Ireland.

4.
Eur J Ophthalmol ; 32(4): 2445-2451, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354692

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the patterns of patient generated aerosol in the context of ophthalmic surgery and ophthalmic examinations. To inform medical teams regarding potential hazards and suggest mitigating measures. METHODS: Qualitatively, real-time time videography assessed exhalation patterns from simulated patients under different clinical scenarios using propylene glycol from an e-cigarette. Quantitatively, high-speed Schlieren imaging was performed to enable high resolution recordings analysable by MATLAB technical computing software. RESULTS: Without a face mask, the standard prior to COVID 19, vapour was observed exiting through the opening in the drape over the surgical field. The amount of vapour increased when a surgical mask was worn. With a taped face mask, the amount of vapour decreased and with inclusion of a continuous suction device, the least amount of vapour was seen. These results were equivocal when the patient was supine or sitting upright. High-speed Schlieren imaging corroborated these findings and in addition showed substantial increase in airflow egress during coughing and with ill-fitting face masks. CONCLUSION: Advising patients to wear a surgical mask at the time of ophthalmic interventions potentially contaminants the ocular field with patient generated aerosol risking endophthalmitis. Surgeon safety can be maintained with personal protective equipment to mitigate the increased egress of vapour from the surgical drape and taping, with or without suction is advisable, whilst meticulous hygiene around lenses is required at the time of slit lamp examination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems , Endophthalmitis , Aerosols , COVID-19/prevention & control , Endophthalmitis/surgery , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment
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