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1.
Ir J Psychol Med ; : 1-4, 2022 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115654

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify levels and key correlates of happiness across Europe in 2018, prior to the Covid-19 pandemic. METHODS: We used data from the European Social Survey to determine levels of happiness in individuals (n = 49,419) from 29 European countries and identify associations between happiness and age, gender, satisfaction with income, employment status, community trust, satisfaction with health, satisfaction with democracy, religious belief and country of residence. RESULTS: In 2018, self-rated happiness varied significantly across the 29 European countries, with individuals in Denmark reporting the highest levels of happiness (8.38 out of 10) and individuals in Bulgaria reporting the lowest (5.55). Ireland ranked 11th (7.7). Happiness had significant, independent associations with younger age, satisfaction with health, satisfaction with household income, community trust, satisfaction with democracy and religious belief. These factors accounted for 25.4% of the variance in happiness between individuals, and, once they were taken into account, country of residence was no longer significantly associated with happiness. CONCLUSIONS: Self-rated happiness varied significantly across pre-pandemic. At individual level, happiness was more closely associated with certain variables than with country of residence. It is likely that the Covid-19 pandemic had significant impacts on some or all of these variables. This highlights the importance of further analysis of correlates of happiness in Europe over future years, when detailed happiness data from during and after the pandemic become available.

3.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 38(3): 232-233, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096530
4.
Irish Journal of Medical Science ; 191(SUPPL 1):S34, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1866670

ABSTRACT

Considerable literature has reported the COVID-19 pandemic's negative mental health sequelae. This surge in mental health problems will likely present to primary care in the coming months. The development of interventions to support GPs in the care of patients with mental health problems is a priority. The aim of this review was to examine interventions which could be implemented in general practice to enhance care of mental health disorders post COVID-19. PubMed, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar and WHO Global Research on COVID-19 databases were searched following Arksey and O'Malley's scoping review process(1). Initial searches identified 148 articles. Twenty-nine studies were included in the review, mostly randomised control trials, qualitative interviews and surveys. Outcome measures to test feasibility of interventions included the 'Seven-item Generalised Anxiety Disorder Scale' and 'Nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire'. Results were divided into themes: Interventions to improve identification of mental health disorders;Interventions to support GPs;Therapeutic interventions;Telemedicine interventions, and barriers and facilitators to intervention implementation. Interventions requiring active involvement of patients in their own care may be effective. GPs should encourage participation in physical activity andmeditation, implement digitalmental health interventions and incorporate telemedicine into their practice. Our findings suggest a broad range of interventions may be implemented in primary care to tackle the mental health sequelae of COVID-19. Practitioners worldwide must stay informed of relevant research, and actively implement studied interventions to improve the mental health care they offer. Priority areas for future research include biological treatments for mental health sequelae of COVID-19.

5.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 38(4): 313-314, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593781
6.
QJM ; 115(1): 5-6, 2022 Jan 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546020
8.
Irish Medical Journal ; 113(10):1-6, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1158635

ABSTRACT

There is widespread concern about the impact of Covid-19 and associated restrictions on mental health. Evidence to date shows that the combined effect of the Covid-19 pandemic and associated restrictions is that approximately one person in every five in the general population in Ireland (and elsewhere) has significantly increased psychological distress (e.g. anxiety, depression). Risk factors include being female and living alone. Rates of significant psychological distress among healthcare workers are approximately double those in the general population. To ameliorate this, healthcare staff require careful rostering, ability to take leave, organisational support from employers and, where necessary, “psychological first aid”. Covid-19 infection itself affects mental health both immediately (e.g. depression, anxiety) and, most likely, in the longer term, especially among those hospitalised (e.g. post-traumatic stress, post-viral syndromes). People with pre-existing mental illness are at significantly increased risk of Covid-19 infection and require particular support to maintain wellness during the pandemic.

9.
Process Safety Progress ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1107714

ABSTRACT

Aging equipment has long been a reality in the chemical process industries. Plants built in the 1950s and 1960s, during an age of prosperity and growth, have since surpassed their life expectancy and many are still operating. Aging equipment is often more prone to failure than equipment built to current standards. Aging is recognized as a significant contributor to industrial accidents particularly in North America. CCPS published a concept book in 2018 highlighting best practices for dealing with aging equipment. In the current economic downturn coupled with the COVID-19 pandemic there are some additional challenges in applying these best practices. This article discusses some of these challenges. © 2021 American Institute of Chemical Engineers

11.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 38(4): 307-312, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-723239

ABSTRACT

The declaration of a COVID-19 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - CoronaVirus2) pandemic by the World Health Organization in March 2020 has vastly changed the landscape in which mental health services function. Consideration is required to adapt services during this unusual time, ensuring continued provision of care for current patients, availability of care for patients with new-onset mental health difficulties and delivery of evidence-based support for healthcare professionals working with affected patients. Lessons can be learned from research carried out during the severe acute respiratory syndrome, Middle East respiratory syndrome and Ebola epidemics to ensure the delivery of efficient and effective mental health services both now and into the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychiatry , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Med Intensiva (Engl Ed) ; 2020 Jul 04.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-624137
13.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 37(4): 259-263, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-259258

ABSTRACT

Crises such as the global pandemic of COVID-19 (coronavirus) elicit a range of responses from individuals and societies adversely affecting physical and emotional well-being. This article provides an overview of factors elicited in response to COVID-19 and their impact on immunity, physical health, mental health and well-being. Certain groups, such as individuals with mental illness, are especially vulnerable, so it is important to maximise the supports available to this population and their families during the pandemic. More broadly, the World Health Organization recommends 'Psychological First Aid' as a useful technique that can help many people in a time of crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Psychology/methods , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/psychology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/etiology , World Health Organization
14.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 37(4): 269-274, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-59789

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This paper seeks to provide a brief overview of epidemics and pandemics in Irish history and to identify any lessons that might be useful in relation to psychiatry in the context of COVID-19. METHODS: A review of selected key reports, papers and publications related to epidemics and pandemics in Irish history was conducted. RESULTS: Viruses, epidemics and pandemics are recurring features of human history. Early Irish sources record a broad array of plagues, pandemics and epidemics including bubonic plague, typhus, cholera, dysentery and smallpox, as well as an alleged epidemic of insanity in the 19th century (that never truly occurred). Like the Spanish flu pandemic (1918-20), COVID-19 (a new coronavirus) presents both the challenge of the illness itself and the problems caused by the anxiety that the virus triggers. Managing this anxiety has always been a challenge, especially with the Spanish flu. People with mental illness had particularly poor outcomes with the Spanish flu, often related to the large, unhygienic mental hospitals in which so many were housed. CONCLUSIONS: Even today, a full century after the Spanish flu pandemic, people with mental illness remain at increased risk of poor physical health, so it is imperative that multi-disciplinary care continues during the current outbreak of COVID-19, despite the manifest difficulties involved. The histories of previous epidemics and pandemics clearly demonstrate that good communication and solidarity matter, now more than ever, especially for people with mental illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/history , Epidemics/history , Pandemics/history , Plague/history , History, 15th Century , History, 16th Century , History, 17th Century , History, 18th Century , History, 19th Century , History, 20th Century , History, Medieval , Ireland
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