Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 61
Filter
1.
Public Health Nurs ; 2022 Oct 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2078650

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Young adults experiencing homelessness (YAEH) experience more stressors compared to housed peers, yet little is known about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on these youth. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how YAEH perceived the pandemic's impact on their well-being and coping. METHODS: YAEH were recruited from those participating in an HIV prevention study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysis was guided by Lazarus and Folkman's transactional theory of stress and coping. RESULTS: Four major themes were identified from interviews with 40 youth: (1) ongoing harms, (2) COVID-19 as a stressor, (3) mental health impacts, and (4) coping strategies. Participants described unmet basic needs, emotions of frustration and anxiety, and several coping strategies including substance use. CONCLUSION: Many YAEH reported experiencing continued challenges that were compounded by the stressors related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Special considerations are needed to address pandemic-related exacerbations of mental health symptoms and substance use among YAEH.

2.
American Journal of Public Health ; 112:S245-S249, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2045674

ABSTRACT

Yet, lack of vaccine uptake puts in peril the goal of controlling the spread ofthe virus, particularly among communities that are at greatest risk of contracting and dying ofthe illness.8 The reasons for the lack of COVID-19 vaccine uptake among some communities in the United States are multifaceted, some of which include concerns about the safety or effectiveness ofthe vaccines, the speed in which the vaccines were developed, misinformation about the vaccines, and systemic barriers affecting community access (i.e., online appointment systems, inadequate transportation, and lack of child care).9,10 For many communities of color, including African American and Latinx individuals, COVID-19 vaccine reluctance is rooted in both historical and contemporary experiences of systemic racism, forced sterilization of Latinx women in California, the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male (renamed as the US Public Health Service Syphilis Study at Tuskegee), marginalization, medical distrust, neglect from the scientific and medical communities, poor public health infrastructure, and institutional abandonment.2,3,10 In addition to those reasons, the politicization ofthe vaccine development process and efforts to increase vaccination after the 2020 US presidential election have deepened distrust among some communities. A 2021 Kaiser Family Foundation survey found that 79% of US adults who have not yet been vaccinated say they would likely turn to a trusted nurse, doctor, or other health care provider when deoiding wherher to ger a vaooination.11 As health oare professionals, nurses and other public health workers are often a patient's first clinical contact and are among the most trusted sources of information about the vaccines. Nurses are leading the nation's vaccine administration efforts and, to many, are the most accessible source of information for questions about safety, side effects, and benefits.11,12 To be effective, nurses and other public health workers require an understanding of the reasons that prevent people from getting vaccinated and have practical tools to support people with their decisions regarding if, when, and how they get vaccinated against COVID-19. The relationship between the stages in the framework are cyclical, and individuals can move in either direction at different points in time when exposed to new information tog., negative news reports) or negative experiences (e.g., a family member who had an adverse reaction).

3.
J Neurosurg Case Lessons ; 2(19): CASE21543, 2021 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2022562

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little is known about whether coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) influences cavernous malformation (CM) formation or hemorrhage risk. OBSERVATIONS: The authors present the case of a 31-year-old patient who developed a hemorrhagic, de novo CM in the setting of a developmental venous anomaly within 3 months of COVID-19 respiratory disease. The authors speculate that COVID-19 disease stimulated formation of the CM through TLR4 inflammatory pathways and subsequently led to the hemorrhagic presentation because of hypercoagulability related to the disease. LESSONS: This case raises the possibility that COVID-19 may be a risk factor for de novo development of CMs in predisposed patients.

4.
Journal of Chemical Education ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2004739

ABSTRACT

A physical chemistry lab for undergraduate students described in this report is about applying kinetic models to analyze the spread of COVID-19 in the United States and obtain the reproduction numbers. The susceptible-infectious-recovery (SIR) model and the SIR-vaccinated (SIRV) model are explained to the students and are used to analyze the COVID-19 spread data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The basic reproduction number R0 and the real-time reproduction number Rt of COVID-19 are extracted by fitting the data with the models, which explains the spreading kinetics and provides a prediction of the spreading trend in a given state. The procedure outlined here shows the differences between the SIR model and the SIRV model. The SIRV model considers the effect of vaccination, which helps explain the later stages of the ongoing pandemic. The predictive power of the models is also shown giving the students some certainty in the predictions they made for the following months.

5.
The International journal of pharmacy practice ; 30(Suppl 1):i22-i23, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1998763

ABSTRACT

Introduction Housebound patients may face challenges to their medicines management due to reduced household mobility and potential lack of access to healthcare services. Previous literature has explored the medication-related needs of housebound patients from pharmacists’ perspectives (1-2). However little work has focussed on the patient/family perspective. In this study, we used data obtained from those staying at home as much as possible during the COVID-19 pandemic to fill this gap. Aim To explore home medicine practices and safety for people who were housebound during the COVID19 pandemic and to create guidance, from the patient/family perspective, for enabling pharmacists to facilitate safe medicine practices for this population. Methods Interviews were carried out with people who were taking at least one long term medication and met the criteria for ‘shielding’ and/or were over 70 years of age during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK and/or their family carers. Respondents were recruited through patient and public involvement representatives, the research team’s networks, and support groups. Potential participants were approached via personal contact and social media. Interviews were conducted by telephone or video conferencing and participants asked about their medicines management while staying at home. Inductive thematic analysis was carried out. Patient and public involvement representatives were involved in the data analysis alongside the researchers. Results Fifty people were interviewed (16 males, 34 females;mean age 68 years, range 26–93 years). Interview data suggested diversity of experiences of medicines management while staying at home. Some respondents reported no or little change, others an initial crisis followed by re-stabilisation, and others that the pandemic was a tipping point, exacerbating underlying challenges and having negative effects on their health and wellbeing. Medicine safety issues reported included omitted doses and less-effective formulations being used. Participants also described experiencing high levels of anxiety related to obtaining medicines, monitoring medicines and feeling at risk of contracting COVID-19 while accessing medicine-related healthcare services. Key factors identified as facilitating a smooth transition included patients’ own agency, support from family, friends and community, good communication with pharmacy staff, continuity of pharmacy services and synchronisation of medicines supply so that a maximum of one collection/delivery was required each month. Conclusion The study findings that we have presented relate to the UK only;this may limit the generalisability of our findings to other countries. Findings from Ireland are in the process of being analysed and will provide a basis of comparison. In addition, more females took part than males, despite efforts to address this. However, our findings suggest pharmacy staff can support medicines management for people who are housebound by synchronisation of medicines supply, delivering medicines where possible, developing/raising awareness of alternative means of communication, providing continuity of pharmacy services and signposting any community support available. References (1) Kayyali R, Funnell G, Harrap N, Patel A. Can community pharmacy successfully bridge the gap in care for housebound patients? Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy 2019;15:425-439. (2) Latif A, Mandane B, Anderson E, Barraclough C, Travis S. Optimizing medicine use for people who are homebound: an evaluation of a pilot domiciliary Medicine Use Review (dMUR) service in England. Integr Pharm Res Pract 2018;7:33-40.

6.
Journal of Hepatology ; 77:S551, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1996642

ABSTRACT

Background and aims: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major global health problem in adults & children. The recent efficacy of Direct Acting Anti-viral therapy (DAA) has cure rates of 99% in adults and adolescents. These drugs were licensed for children 3–12 yrs during the recent coronavirus pandemic. To ensure equitable access, safe & convenient supply during lockdown, we established a virtual national treatment pathway for children with HCV in England & evaluated its feasibility, efficacy & treatment outcomes. Method: A paediatric Multidisciplinary Team Operational Delivery Network (pMDT ODN), supported by NHS England (NHSE), was established with relevant paediatric specialists to provide a single point of contact for referrals & information. Referral & treatment protocolswere agreed for HCV therapy approved byMHRA& EMA. On referral the pMDT ODN agreed the most appropriate DAA therapy based on clinical presentation & patient preferences, including ability to swallow tablets. Treatment was prescribed in association with the local paediatrician & pharmacist, without the need for children & families to travel to national centres. All children were eligible for NHS funded therapy;referral centres were approved by the pMDT ODN to dispense medication;funding was reimbursed via a national NHSE agreement. Demographic & clinical data, treatment outcomes & SVR 12 were collected. Feedback on feasibility & satisfaction on the pathway was sought from referrers. Results: In the first 6 months, 34 childrenwere referred;30- England;4-Wales;median (range) age 10 (3.9–14.5) yrs;15M;19F: Most were genotype type 1 (17) & 3 (12);2 (1);4 (4). Co-morbidities included: obesity (2);cardiac anomaly (1);Cystic Fibrosis (1);Juvenile Arthritis (1). No child had cirrhosis. DAA therapy prescribed: Harvoni (21);Epclusa (11);Maviret (2). 27/34 could swallow tablets;3/7 received training to swallowtablets;4/7 are awaiting release of granules.11/27 have completed treatment and cleared virus;of these 7/11 to date achieved SVR 12. 30 children requiring DAA granule formulation are awaiting referral and treatment. Referrers found the virtual process easy to access, valuing opportunity to discuss their patient’s therapy with the MDT & many found it educational. There were difficulties in providing the medication through the local pharmacy. However there are manufacturing delays in providing granule formulations because suppliers focused on treatments for COVID, leading to delays in referring and treating children unable to swallow tablets. Conclusion: The National HCV pMDT ODN delivers high quality treatment & equity of access for children & young people, 3–18 yrs with HCV in England, ensuring they receive care close to home with 100% cure rates.

7.
Eur Heart J ; 43(24): 2261-2263, 2022 Jun 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1967883
8.
Heart Lung ; 56: 175-180, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966607

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The clinical work of nurses across the United States was profoundly impacted by the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Nurses in both hospital and outpatient settings had to adapt quickly to the continuously changing healthcare environment. OBJECTIVE: To describe nurses' responses to open-ended questions of their clinical work adaption during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A descriptive, cross-sectional survey with four open-ended questions was completed by practicing HF nurses. Content analysis was used to analyze the written data. RESULTS: The 127 nurses who provided one to four narrative responses, 55.1% were clinical registered nurses and 44.9% were advance practice nurses. Four categories emerged: changing paths exemplifies work challenges, developing technical skills and resources, asking better questions while listening, and showing resilience through new paths to optimize work. CONCLUSION: Understanding perceptions of nurses' adaptions to clinical work made during the pandemic provides insight into the challenges and opportunities for development in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Humans , United States/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies
9.
Front Public Health ; 10: 857674, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933894

ABSTRACT

To effectively respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, California had to quickly mobilize a substantial number of case investigators (CIs) and contact tracers (CTs). This workforce was comprised primarily of redirected civil servants with diverse educational and professional backgrounds. The purpose of this evaluation was to understand whether the weeklong, remote course developed to train California's CI/CT workforce (i.e., Virtual Training Academy) adequately prepared trainees for deployment. From May 2020 to February 2021, 8,141 individuals completed the training. A survey administered ~3 weeks post-course assessed two measures of overall preparedness: self-perceived interviewing proficiency and self-perceived job preparedness. Bivariate analyses were used to examine differences in preparedness scores by education level, career background, and whether trainees volunteered to join the COVID-19 workforce or were assigned by their employers. There were no significant differences in preparedness by education level. Compared to trainees from non-public health backgrounds, those from public health fields had higher self-perceived interviewing proficiency (25.1 vs. 23.3, p < 0.001) and job preparedness (25.7 vs. 24.0, p < 0.01). Compared to those who were assigned, those who volunteered to join the workforce had lower self-perceived job preparedness (23.8 vs. 24.9, p = 0.02). While there were some statistically significant differences by trainee characteristics, the practical significance was small (<2-point differences on 30-point composite scores), and it was notable that there were no differences by education level. Overall, this evaluation suggests that individuals without bachelor's degrees or health backgrounds can be rapidly trained and deployed to provide critical disease investigation capacity during public health emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , California , Contact Tracing , Feedback , Humans , Pandemics , Workforce
10.
The Qualitative Report ; 27(7):1197-1219, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1925029

ABSTRACT

While the COVID-19 pandemic has amplified the once marginalized conversation of academia's gendered imbalance of opportunity, discussion of its impact on graduate student mothers has remained absent. Resilience has been cited as key to overcoming in the pandemic era with little discussion of how its conceptualization continues to marginalize females in the academy. Our phenomenological study explores graduate student mothers' conceptualizations of balance, failure, success, and resilience using a family resilience framework which acknowledges the multiple identities to which they may avow and contexts in which they may operate. Employing an ecological conceptual framework, we engaged nine graduate student mothers and their children in focus groups and analyzed data using a constructivist grounded theory approach. Our research found that many graduate student mothers' definitions of success led them to delay qualifying exams and comps during the pandemic. Our exploration of the ecology of our participants' resilience during quarantine begins the generation of a new graduate student mother resilience theory in which the ability to overcome adversity is rooted in celebration, gratitude, collaborative problem-solving, connection, and flexibility. We recommend continued development of this new theory and provide insight into the supports higher education can offer to address the leaky academic pipeline.

11.
American Journal of Public Health ; 112(Sup3):S245-S249, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1897823
12.
Current Orthopaedic Practice ; 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1821984

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many medical education institutions to switch from in-person to online learning environments. There is an existing gap in knowledge about the effectiveness of virtual learning for medical students. Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine if virtual orthopaedic surgery away rotations (VOSAR) benefit medical students and programs. Methods: Virtual rotations were created at two large residency programs for fourth-year medical students. From October 12, 2020 through December 28, 2020, satisfaction and quality were assessed using a 22-question survey, residency interview, rank, and match data. Forty-two fourth-year medical students participated, 38 of whom responded to the survey. Results: Most students stated course objectives were clear and consistent with coursework. Most were pleased with the variety of cases and presentations and were able to meaningfully interact with faculty and residents. Most stated they would participate again and suggest the rotation to others. Twenty-five of 42 participants were ranked by at least one program;39 were accepted into residency positions, 21 of which were in orthopaedic surgery. Conclusions: The results indicate that the VOSAR benefits students and programs. Based on the success of the VOSAR, both programs continued to offer the curriculum for 2021. Level of Evidence: Level IV.

13.
International Journal of Pharmacy Practice ; 30(SUPPL 1):i22-i23, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816104

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Housebound patients may face challenges to their medicines management due to reduced household mobility and potential lack of access to healthcare services. Previous literature has explored the medication-related needs of housebound patients from pharmacists' perspectives (1-2). However little work has focussed on the patient/family perspective. In this study, we used data obtained from those staying at home as much as possible during the COVID-19 pandemic to fill this gap. Aim: To explore home medicine practices and safety for people who were housebound during the COVID19 pandemic and to create guidance, from the patient/family perspective, for enabling pharmacists to facilitate safe medicine practices for this population. Methods: Interviews were carried out with people who were taking at least one long term medication and met the criteria for ?shielding' and/or were over 70 years of age during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK and/or their family carers. Respondents were recruited through patient and public involvement representatives, the research team's networks, and support groups. Potential participants were approached via personal contact and social media. Interviews were conducted by telephone or video conferencing and participants asked about their medicines management while staying at home. Inductive thematic analysis was carried out. Patient and public involvement representatives were involved in the data analysis alongside the researchers. Results: Fifty people were interviewed (16 males, 34 females;mean age 68 years, range 26-93 years). Interview data suggested diversity of experiences of medicines management while staying at home. Some respondents reported no or little change, others an initial crisis followed by re-stabilisation, and others that the pandemic was a tipping point, exacerbating underlying challenges and having negative effects on their health and wellbeing. Medicine safety issues reported included omitted doses and less-effective formulations being used. Participants also described experiencing high levels of anxiety related to obtaining medicines, monitoring medicines and feeling at risk of contracting COVID-19 while accessing medicine-related healthcare services. Key factors identified as facilitating a smooth transition included patients' own agency, support from family, friends and community, good communication with pharmacy staff, continuity of pharmacy services and synchronisation of medicines supply so that a maximum of one collection/delivery was required each month. Conclusion: The study findings that we have presented relate to the UK only;this may limit the generalisability of our findings to other countries. Findings from Ireland are in the process of being analysed and will provide a basis of comparison. In addition, more females took part than males, despite efforts to address this. However, our findings suggest pharmacy staff can support medicines management for people who are housebound by synchronisation of medicines supply, delivering medicines where possible, developing/raising awareness of alternative means of communication, providing continuity of pharmacy services and signposting any community support available.

14.
Int J Nurs Stud ; 131: 104242, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1768186

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pre-COVID-19 research highlighted the nursing profession worldwide as being at high risk from symptoms of burnout, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and suicide. The World Health Organization declared a pandemic on 11th March 2020 due to the sustained risk of further global spread of COVID-19. The high healthcare burden associated with COVID-19 has increased nurses' trauma and workload, thereby exacerbating pressure on an already strained workforce and causing additional psychological distress for staff. OBJECTIVES: The Impact of COVID-19 on Nurses (ICON) interview study examined the impacts of the pandemic on frontline nursing staff's psychosocial and emotional wellbeing. DESIGN: Longitudinal qualitative interview study. SETTINGS: Nurses who had completed time 1 and 2 of the ICON survey were sampled to include a range of UK work settings including acute, primary and community care and care homes. Interviewees were purposively sampled for maximum variation to cover a broad range of personal and professional factors, and experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic, including redeployment. METHODS: Nurses participated in qualitative in-depth narrative interviews after the first wave of COVID-19 in July 2020 (n = 27) and again at the beginning of the second wave in December 2020 (n = 25) via video and audio platform software. Rigorous qualitative narrative analysis was undertaken both cross-sectionally (within wave) and longitudinally (cross wave) to explore issues of consistency and change. RESULTS: The terms moral distress, compassion fatigue, burnout and PTSD describe the emotional states reported by the majority of interviewees leading many to consider leaving the profession. Causes of this identified included care delivery challenges; insufficient staff and training; PPE challenges and frustrations. Four themes were identified: (1) 'Deathscapes' and impoverished care (2) Systemic challenges and self-preservation (3) Emotional exhaustion and (4) (Un)helpful support. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses have been deeply affected by what they have experienced and report being forever altered with the impacts of COVID-19 persisting and deeply felt. There is an urgent need to tackle stigma to create a psychologically safe working environment and for a national COVID-19 nursing workforce recovery strategy to help restore nurse's well-being and demonstrate a valuing of the nursing workforce and therefore support retention.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , United Kingdom
15.
US Endocrinology ; 17(1):10-13, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1766544

ABSTRACT

We assessed real-time continuous glucose monitoring (rtCGM) data in an individual with type 2 diabetes who presented with severe symptoms of COVID-19, and suffered a fatal cardiac arrest during hospitalization. In this retrospective analysis, we used rtCGM to evaluate changes in blood glucose levels in a 71-year-old male with COVID-19 symptoms who suffered a fatal cardiac arrest. Blood glucose levels remained constant at 220–225 mg/dL after the first cardiac arrest, slowly decreased to 167 mg/dL after return of spontaneous circulation was achieved, and rose to 198 mg/dL prior to the second arrest. After the patient expired, glucose levels decreased to the 141 mg/dL over the first hour, but quickly declined to undetectable levels within the next 20 minutes. Wider adoption of rtCGM use in patients with COVID-19 may help identify blood glucose patterns and uncover new insights to various comorbidities and conditions

16.
Sustainability ; 14(6):3341, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1742694

ABSTRACT

Urban public food procurement can address malnutrition and improve the beneficiary experience at public institutions whilst reshaping food systems to be healthier and more sustainable. We reviewed grey and peer-reviewed literature on urban public food procurement in Kiambu and Machakos counties in Kenya. From the literature, we selected programmes for case study research through stakeholder interviews and targeted literature searching. We searched 11 databases and reviewed 23 relevant articles. The case studies involved early childhood education centre and primary school feeding, hospital food provision, and COVID-19 responses. We found that actionable data and public–private partnerships are enabling factors. Similarly, multistakeholder involvement and governance increase coordination. However, budget constraints threaten programme stability. Procurement criteria focused on nutrition, food quality, and community development, but did not explicitly include environmental sustainability. We linked case studies to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, and 12. By developing, improving, and scaling public food procurement, urban governments in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) can reach the most vulnerable whilst improving farmer livelihoods, creating business opportunities, and addressing environmental concerns. This paper contributes implementational insights in Kenyan urban contexts by highlighting opportunities for local and regional policymakers in LMICs and their partners to strengthen public food procurement.

17.
Social Media and Society ; 8(1), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1741891

ABSTRACT

This article examines how individuals proximate to online body justice communities utilized and experienced social media during COVID-19. The majority of research during the pandemic has been quantitative and survey-based;it has also tended to center (dis)information spread or mental health concerns. Our qualitative interviews with 44 individuals offer nuanced insights into what social media meant to people during quarantine, how they used it, and how they reflected on their experience of it. Five major themes emerged through reflexive, thematic analysis of the interview data: changed temporal rhythms, influx of toxic content, resource building, additive and subtractive actions, and algorithmic awareness. Some participants described social media as an increasingly harmful influence in their lives during the pandemic due to compulsive usage and exposure to “toxic content” like misinformation, weight stigma, and homophobia. At the same time, participants noted how social media positively enabled social connection, education, and activation around social justice. Across both of these extremes, many elaborated on the intensive, self-reflective labor of cultivating their accounts so that they mirrored their identities and the kinds of experiences they wanted to have online while preventing the infiltration of unwanted content. In addition to offering new insights into social media usage in body justice communities during COVID-19, our data suggest alternative ways of understanding how individuals manage their experience of social media, curate their social media feeds through additive and subtractive actions, and frequently reflect on how their choices interact with platform algorithms. © The Author(s) 2022.

18.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun ; 605: 171-176, 2022 05 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739555

ABSTRACT

A key component of severe COVID-19 is a "cytokine storm" i.e., the excessive expression of unneeded cytokines. Previous studies suggest that SARS-CoV-2 proteins can induce macrophages to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines; a process that may involve Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has been implicated in TLR signal transduction and a selective GSK-3 inhibitor, termed COB-187, dramatically attenuates cytokine expression induced by the TLR ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the present study, we provide evidence that the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (S) and the S2 subunit (S2) induce production of CXCL10 (a chemokine elevated in severe COVID-19) by a human macrophage cell line. Further, we report that two clinically relevant GSK-3 inhibitors and COB-187 attenuate S and S2 protein-induced CXCL10 production. Combined, our observations provide impetus for investigating GSK-3 inhibitors as potential therapeutics for severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
19.
Irish Medical Journal ; 114(10), 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1710708
20.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(11)2022 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713294

ABSTRACT

The impacts of interferon (IFN) signaling on COVID-19 pathology are multiple, with both protective and harmful effects being documented. We report here a multiomics investigation of systemic IFN signaling in hospitalized COVID-19 patients, defining the multiomics biosignatures associated with varying levels of 12 different type I, II, and III IFNs. The antiviral transcriptional response in circulating immune cells is strongly associated with a specific subset of IFNs, most prominently IFNA2 and IFNG. In contrast, proteomics signatures indicative of endothelial damage and platelet activation associate with high levels of IFNB1 and IFNA6. Seroconversion and time since hospitalization associate with a significant decrease in a specific subset of IFNs. Additionally, differential IFN subtype production is linked to distinct constellations of circulating myeloid and lymphoid immune cell types. Each IFN has a unique metabolic signature, with IFNG being the most associated with activation of the kynurenine pathway. IFNs also show differential relationships with clinical markers of poor prognosis and disease severity. For example, whereas IFNG has the strongest association with C-reactive protein and other immune markers of poor prognosis, IFNB1 associates with increased neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, a marker of late severe disease. Altogether, these results reveal specialized IFN action in COVID-19, with potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications.


Subject(s)
Blood/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , Interferons/blood , Proteome , Transcriptome , COVID-19/blood , Case-Control Studies , Datasets as Topic , Humans , Inpatients
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL