Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 30(8): 915-921, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1908156

ABSTRACT

Devastating pandemics, such as that due to COVID-19, can provide strong testimony to our knowledge of the genetic and evolutionary determinants of infectious disease susceptibility and severity. One of the most remarkable aspects of such outbreaks is the stunning interindividual variability observed in the course of infection. In recent decades, enormous progress has been made in the field of the human genetics of infectious diseases, and an increasing number of human genetic factors have been reported to explain, to a great extent, the observed variability for a large number of infectious agents. However, our understanding of the cellular, molecular, and immunological mechanisms underlying such disparities between individuals and ethnic groups, remains very limited. Here, we discuss recent findings relating to human genetic predisposition to infectious disease, from an immunological or population genetic perspective, and show how these and other innovative approaches have been applied to deciphering the genetic basis of human susceptibility to COVID-19 and the severity of this disease. From an evolutionary perspective, we show how past demographic and selection events characterizing the history of our species, including admixture with archaic humans, such as Neanderthals, facilitated modern human adaptation to the threats imposed by ancient pathogens. In the context of emerging infectious diseases, these past episodes of genetic adaptation may contribute to some of the observed population differences in the outcome of SARS-CoV-2 infection and the severity of COVID-19 illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Biological Evolution , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Curr Opin Immunol ; 72: 116-125, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228006

ABSTRACT

Population genetic studies have clearly indicated that immunity and host defense are among the functions most frequently subject to natural selection, and increased our understanding of the biological relevance of the corresponding genes and their contribution to variable immune traits and diseases. Herein, we will focus on some recently studied forms of human adaptation to infectious agents, including hybridization with now-extinct hominins, such as Neanderthals and Denisovans, and admixture between modern human populations. These studies, which are partly enabled by the technological advances in the sequencing of DNA from ancient remains, provide new insight into the sources of immune response variation in contemporary humans, such as the recently reported link between Neanderthal heritage and susceptibility to severe COVID-19 disease. Furthermore, ancient DNA analyses, in both humans and pathogens, allow to measure the action of natural selection on immune genes across time and to reconstruct the impact of past epidemics on the evolution of human immunity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunity/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , Evolution, Molecular , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genetics, Population , Genomics , Hominidae , Humans
3.
Science ; 370(6515)2020 10 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-889832

ABSTRACT

Interindividual clinical variability in the course of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is vast. We report that at least 101 of 987 patients with life-threatening coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia had neutralizing immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies (auto-Abs) against interferon-ω (IFN-ω) (13 patients), against the 13 types of IFN-α (36), or against both (52) at the onset of critical disease; a few also had auto-Abs against the other three type I IFNs. The auto-Abs neutralize the ability of the corresponding type I IFNs to block SARS-CoV-2 infection in vitro. These auto-Abs were not found in 663 individuals with asymptomatic or mild SARS-CoV-2 infection and were present in only 4 of 1227 healthy individuals. Patients with auto-Abs were aged 25 to 87 years and 95 of the 101 were men. A B cell autoimmune phenocopy of inborn errors of type I IFN immunity accounts for life-threatening COVID-19 pneumonia in at least 2.6% of women and 12.5% of men.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/blood , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Interferon alpha-2/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Asymptomatic Infections , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Science ; 370(6515)2020 10 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-796722

ABSTRACT

Clinical outcome upon infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) ranges from silent infection to lethal coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We have found an enrichment in rare variants predicted to be loss-of-function (LOF) at the 13 human loci known to govern Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3)- and interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7)-dependent type I interferon (IFN) immunity to influenza virus in 659 patients with life-threatening COVID-19 pneumonia relative to 534 subjects with asymptomatic or benign infection. By testing these and other rare variants at these 13 loci, we experimentally defined LOF variants underlying autosomal-recessive or autosomal-dominant deficiencies in 23 patients (3.5%) 17 to 77 years of age. We show that human fibroblasts with mutations affecting this circuit are vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2. Inborn errors of TLR3- and IRF7-dependent type I IFN immunity can underlie life-threatening COVID-19 pneumonia in patients with no prior severe infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Loss of Function Mutation , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alleles , Asymptomatic Infections , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Genetic Loci , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Infant , Interferon Regulatory Factor-7/deficiency , Interferon Regulatory Factor-7/genetics , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/deficiency , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Toll-Like Receptor 3/deficiency , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL