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1.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 679, 2022 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671560

ABSTRACT

Emergence of mutant SARS-CoV-2 strains associated with an increased risk of COVID-19-related death necessitates better understanding of the early viral dynamics, host responses and immunopathology. Single cell RNAseq (scRNAseq) allows for the study of individual cells, uncovering heterogeneous and variable responses to environment, infection and inflammation. While studies have reported immune profiling using scRNAseq in terminal human COVID-19 patients, performing longitudinal immune cell dynamics in humans is challenging. Macaques are a suitable model of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our longitudinal scRNAseq of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell suspensions from young rhesus macaques infected with SARS-CoV-2 (n = 6) demonstrates dynamic changes in transcriptional landscape 3 days post- SARS-CoV-2-infection (3dpi; peak viremia), relative to 14-17dpi (recovery phase) and pre-infection (baseline) showing accumulation of distinct populations of both macrophages and T-lymphocytes expressing strong interferon-driven inflammatory gene signature at 3dpi. Type I interferon response is induced in the plasmacytoid dendritic cells with appearance of a distinct HLADR+CD68+CD163+SIGLEC1+ macrophage population exhibiting higher angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) expression. These macrophages are significantly enriched in the lungs of macaques at 3dpi and harbor SARS-CoV-2 while expressing a strong interferon-driven innate anti-viral gene signature. The accumulation of these responses correlated with decline in viremia and recovery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Interferons/pharmacology , Myeloid Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents , Bronchoalveolar Lavage , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Inflammation , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/pharmacology , Interferons/genetics , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Macaca mulatta , Macrophages/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
2.
[Unspecified Source]; 2020.
Preprint in English | [Unspecified Source] | ID: ppcovidwho-292798

ABSTRACT

The novel virus SARS-CoV-2 has infected more than 14 million people worldwide resulting in the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Limited information on the underlying immune mechanisms that drive disease or protection during COVID-19 severely hamper development of therapeutics and vaccines. Thus, the establishment of relevant animal models that mimic the pathobiology of the disease is urgent. Rhesus macaques infected with SARS-CoV-2 exhibit disease pathobiology similar to human COVID-19, thus serving as a relevant animal model. In the current study, we have characterized the transcriptional signatures induced in the lungs of juvenile and old rhesus macaques following SARS-CoV-2 infection. We show that genes associated with Interferon (IFN) signaling, neutrophil degranulation and innate immune pathways are significantly induced in macaque infected lungs, while pathways associated with collagen formation are downregulated. In COVID-19, increasing age is a significant risk factor for poor prognosis and increased mortality. We demonstrate that Type I IFN and Notch signaling pathways are significantly upregulated in lungs of juvenile infected macaques when compared with old infected macaques. These results are corroborated with increased peripheral neutrophil counts and neutrophil lymphocyte ratio in older individuals with COVID-19 disease. In contrast, pathways involving VEGF are downregulated in lungs of old infected macaques. Using samples from humans with SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19, we validate a subset of our findings. Finally, neutrophil degranulation, innate immune system and IFN gamma signaling pathways are upregulated in both tuberculosis and COVID-19, two pulmonary diseases where neutrophils are associated with increased severity. Together, our transcriptomic studies have delineated disease pathways to improve our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of COVID-19 to facilitate the design of new therapeutics for COVID-19.

3.
Cytokine Growth Factor Rev ; 63: 90-97, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466262

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has a broad range of clinical manifestations, highlighting the need for specific diagnostic tools to predict disease severity and improve patient prognosis. Recently, calprotectin (S100A8/A9) has been proposed as a potential biomarker for COVID-19, as elevated serum S100A8/A9 levels are associated with critical COVID-19 cases and can distinguish between mild and severe disease states. S100A8/A9 is an alarmin that mediates host proinflammatory responses during infection and it has been postulated that S100A8/A9 modulates the cytokine storm; the hallmark of fatal COVID-19 cases. However, it has yet to be determined if S100A8/A9 is a bona-fide biomarker for COVID-19. S100A8/A9 is widely implicated in a variety of inflammatory conditions, such as cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), as well as pulmonary infectious diseases, including tuberculosis and influenza. Therefore, understanding how S100A8/A9 levels correlate with immune responses during inflammatory diseases is necessary to evaluate its candidacy as a potential COVID-19 biomarker. This review will outline the protective and detrimental roles of S100A8/A9 during infection, summarize the recent findings detailing the contributions of S100A8/A9 to COVID-19 pathogenesis, and highlight its potential as diagnostic biomarker and a therapeutic target for pulmonary infectious diseases, including COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Calgranulin A , Calgranulin B , Biomarkers , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Infect Dis ; 224(1): 21-30, 2021 07 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379462

ABSTRACT

The differentiation between influenza and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) could constitute a diagnostic challenge during the ongoing winter owing to their clinical similitude. Thus, novel biomarkers are required to enable making this distinction. Here, we evaluated whether the surfactant protein D (SP-D), a collectin produced at the alveolar epithelium with known immune properties, was useful to differentiate pandemic influenza A(H1N1) from COVID-19 in critically ill patients. Our results revealed high serum SP-D levels in patients with severe pandemic influenza but not those with COVID-19. This finding was validated in a separate cohort of mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19 who also showed low plasma SP-D levels. However, plasma SP-D levels did not distinguish seasonal influenza from COVID-19 in mild-to-moderate disease. Finally, we found that high serum SP-D levels were associated with death and renal failure among severe pandemic influenza cases. Thus, our studies have identified SP-D as a unique biomarker expressed during severe pandemic influenza but not COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Gene Expression , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza, Human/genetics , Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Coinfection , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D/blood , Severity of Illness Index , Symptom Assessment , Young Adult
8.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(21)2021 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233774

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic triggered an unparalleled pursuit of vaccines to induce specific adaptive immunity, based on virus-neutralizing antibodies and T cell responses. Although several vaccines have been developed just a year after SARS-CoV-2 emerged in late 2019, global deployment will take months or even years. Meanwhile, the virus continues to take a severe toll on human life and exact substantial economic costs. Innate immunity is fundamental to mammalian host defense capacity to combat infections. Innate immune responses, triggered by a family of pattern recognition receptors, induce interferons and other cytokines and activate both myeloid and lymphoid immune cells to provide protection against a wide range of pathogens. Epidemiological and biological evidence suggests that the live-attenuated vaccines (LAV) targeting tuberculosis, measles, and polio induce protective innate immunity by a newly described form of immunological memory termed "trained immunity." An LAV designed to induce adaptive immunity targeting a particular pathogen may also induce innate immunity that mitigates other infectious diseases, including COVID-19, as well as future pandemic threats. Deployment of existing LAVs early in pandemics could complement the development of specific vaccines, bridging the protection gap until specific vaccines arrive. The broad protection induced by LAVs would not be compromised by potential antigenic drift (immune escape) that can render viruses resistant to specific vaccines. LAVs might offer an essential tool to "bend the pandemic curve," averting the exhaustion of public health resources and preventing needless deaths and may also have therapeutic benefits if used for postexposure prophylaxis of disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunity, Innate , Pandemics/prevention & control , Vaccines/immunology , Adaptive Immunity , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Immunity, Heterologous , Immunologic Memory , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, Attenuated/immunology
9.
Front Immunol ; 12: 593595, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1229174

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is a global health threat with the potential to cause severe disease manifestations in the lungs. Although COVID-19 has been extensively characterized clinically, the factors distinguishing SARS-CoV-2 from other respiratory viruses are unknown. Here, we compared the clinical, histopathological, and immunological characteristics of patients with COVID-19 and pandemic influenza A(H1N1). We observed a higher frequency of respiratory symptoms, increased tissue injury markers, and a histological pattern of alveolar pneumonia in pandemic influenza A(H1N1) patients. Conversely, dry cough, gastrointestinal symptoms and interstitial lung pathology were observed in COVID-19 cases. Pandemic influenza A(H1N1) was characterized by higher levels of IL-1RA, TNF-α, CCL3, G-CSF, APRIL, sTNF-R1, sTNF-R2, sCD30, and sCD163. Meanwhile, COVID-19 displayed an immune profile distinguished by increased Th1 (IL-12, IFN-γ) and Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13) cytokine levels, along with IL-1ß, IL-6, CCL11, VEGF, TWEAK, TSLP, MMP-1, and MMP-3. Our data suggest that SARS-CoV-2 induces a dysbalanced polyfunctional inflammatory response that is different from the immune response against pandemic influenza A(H1N1). Furthermore, we demonstrated the diagnostic potential of some clinical and immune factors to differentiate both diseases. These findings might be relevant for the ongoing and future influenza seasons in the Northern Hemisphere, which are historically unique due to their convergence with the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cytokines , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza, Human , Matrix Metalloproteinase 1 , Matrix Metalloproteinase 3 , Receptors, Immunologic , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/metabolism , Influenza, Human/blood , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/immunology , Male , Matrix Metalloproteinase 1/blood , Matrix Metalloproteinase 1/immunology , Matrix Metalloproteinase 3/blood , Matrix Metalloproteinase 3/immunology , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Receptors, Immunologic/blood , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/immunology
10.
Front Immunol ; 12: 633297, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133913

ABSTRACT

The C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 17 (CXCL17) is chemotactic for myeloid cells, exhibits bactericidal activity, and exerts anti-viral functions. This chemokine is constitutively expressed in the respiratory tract, suggesting a role in lung defenses. However, little is known about the participation of CXCL17 against relevant respiratory pathogens in humans. Here, we evaluated the serum levels and lung tissue expression pattern of CXCL17 in a cohort of patients with severe pandemic influenza A(H1N1) from Mexico City. Peripheral blood samples obtained on admission and seven days after hospitalization were processed for determinations of serum CXCL17 levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expression of CXCL17 was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHQ) in lung autopsy specimens from patients that succumbed to the disease. Serum CXCL17 levels were also analyzed in two additional comparative cohorts of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients. Additionally, the expression of CXCL17 was tested in lung autopsy specimens from COVID-19 patients. A total of 122 patients were enrolled in the study, from which 68 had pandemic influenza A(H1N1), 24 had COVID-19, and 30 with PTB. CXCL17 was detected in post-mortem lung specimens from patients that died of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) and COVID-19. Interestingly, serum levels of CXCL17 were increased only in patients with pandemic influenza A(H1N1), but not COVID-19 and PTB. CXCL17 not only differentiated pandemic influenza A(H1N1) from other respiratory infections but showed prognostic value for influenza-associated mortality and renal failure in machine-learning algorithms and regression analyses. Using cell culture assays, we also identified that human alveolar A549 cells and peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages increase their CXCL17 production capacity after influenza A(H1N1) pdm09 virus infection. Our results for the first time demonstrate an induction of CXCL17 specifically during pandemic influenza A(H1N1), but not COVID-19 and PTB in humans. These findings could be of great utility to differentiate influenza and COVID-19 and to predict poor prognosis specially at settings of high incidence of pandemic A(H1N1). Future studies on the role of CXCL17 not only in severe pandemic influenza, but also in seasonal influenza, COVID-19, and PTB are required to validate our results.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/metabolism , Chemokines, CXC/metabolism , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/physiology , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Lung/metabolism , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Chemokines, CXC/genetics , Chemokines, CXC/immunology , Cohort Studies , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/mortality , Lung/pathology , Male , Mexico , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Outcome Assessment , Prognosis , Survival Analysis , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/diagnosis , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/mortality , Young Adult
11.
J Infect Dis ; 224(1): 21-30, 2021 07 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1120968

ABSTRACT

The differentiation between influenza and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) could constitute a diagnostic challenge during the ongoing winter owing to their clinical similitude. Thus, novel biomarkers are required to enable making this distinction. Here, we evaluated whether the surfactant protein D (SP-D), a collectin produced at the alveolar epithelium with known immune properties, was useful to differentiate pandemic influenza A(H1N1) from COVID-19 in critically ill patients. Our results revealed high serum SP-D levels in patients with severe pandemic influenza but not those with COVID-19. This finding was validated in a separate cohort of mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19 who also showed low plasma SP-D levels. However, plasma SP-D levels did not distinguish seasonal influenza from COVID-19 in mild-to-moderate disease. Finally, we found that high serum SP-D levels were associated with death and renal failure among severe pandemic influenza cases. Thus, our studies have identified SP-D as a unique biomarker expressed during severe pandemic influenza but not COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Gene Expression , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza, Human/genetics , Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Coinfection , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D/blood , Severity of Illness Index , Symptom Assessment , Young Adult
12.
Commun Biol ; 4(1): 290, 2021 03 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118820

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 virus has infected more than 92 million people worldwide resulting in the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Using a rhesus macaque model of SARS-CoV-2 infection, we have characterized the transcriptional signatures induced in the lungs of juvenile and old macaques following infection. Genes associated with Interferon (IFN) signaling, neutrophil degranulation and innate immune pathways are significantly induced in macaque infected lungs, while pathways associated with collagen formation are downregulated, as also seen in lungs of macaques with tuberculosis. In COVID-19, increasing age is a significant risk factor for poor prognosis and increased mortality. Type I IFN and Notch signaling pathways are significantly upregulated in lungs of juvenile infected macaques when compared with old infected macaques. These results are corroborated with increased peripheral neutrophil counts and neutrophil lymphocyte ratio in older individuals with COVID-19 disease. Together, our transcriptomic studies have delineated disease pathways that improve our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cell Degranulation , Interferons/physiology , Neutrophils/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Animals , CD36 Antigens/physiology , COVID-19/etiology , Collagen/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Macaca mulatta , Male , Middle Aged , Receptors, Notch/physiology , Signal Transduction/physiology , Transforming Growth Factor beta/physiology , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/blood , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/physiology
13.
Nat Microbiol ; 6(1): 73-86, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-989838

ABSTRACT

Non-human primate models will expedite therapeutics and vaccines for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) to clinical trials. Here, we compare acute severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in young and old rhesus macaques, baboons and old marmosets. Macaques had clinical signs of viral infection, mild to moderate pneumonitis and extra-pulmonary pathologies, and both age groups recovered in two weeks. Baboons had prolonged viral RNA shedding and substantially more lung inflammation compared with macaques. Inflammation in bronchoalveolar lavage was increased in old versus young baboons. Using techniques including computed tomography imaging, immunophenotyping, and alveolar/peripheral cytokine response and immunohistochemical analyses, we delineated cellular immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection in macaque and baboon lungs, including innate and adaptive immune cells and a prominent type-I interferon response. Macaques developed T-cell memory phenotypes/responses and bystander cytokine production. Old macaques had lower titres of SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG antibody levels compared with young macaques. Acute respiratory distress in macaques and baboons recapitulates the progression of COVID-19 in humans, making them suitable as models to test vaccines and therapies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/veterinary , Callithrix/immunology , Lung/immunology , Macaca mulatta/immunology , Monkey Diseases/virology , Papio/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adaptive Immunity , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Cellular/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Monkey Diseases/immunology , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Viral Load , Virus Shedding
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