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1.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 893, 2022 05 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833299

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Public acceptance of governmental measures are key to controlling the spread of infectious diseases. The COVID-19 pandemic has placed a significant burden on healthcare systems for high-income countries as well as low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The ability of LMICs to respond to the challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic has been limited and may have affected the impact of governmental strategies to control the spread of COVID-19. This study aimed to evaluate and compare public opinion on the governmental COVID-19 response of high and LMICs in the Middle East and benchmark it to international countries. METHODS: An online, self-administered questionnaire was distributed among different Middle Eastern Arab countries. Participants' demographics and level of satisfaction with governmental responses to COVID-19 were analyzed and reported. Scores were benchmarked against 19 international values. RESULTS: A total of 7395 responses were included. Bahrain scored highest for satisfaction with the governmental response with 38.29 ± 2.93 on a scale of 40, followed by the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (37.13 ± 3.27), United Arab Emirates (36.56 ± 3.44), Kuwait (35.74 ± 4.85), Jordan (23.08 ± 6.41), and Lebanon (15.39 ± 5.28). Participants' country of residence was a significant predictor of the satisfaction score (P < 0.001), and participants who suffered income reduction due to the pandemic, had a history of SARS-CoV-2 infection, and held higher educational degrees had significantly lower satisfaction scores (P < 0.001). When benchmarked with other international publics, countries from the Gulf Cooperation Council had the highest satisfaction level, Jordan had an average score, and Lebanon had one of the lowest satisfaction scores. CONCLUSION: The political crisis in Lebanon merged with the existing corruption were associated with the lowest public satisfaction score whereas the economical instability of Jordan placed the country just before the lowest position. On the other hand, the solid economy plus good planning and public trust in the government placed the other countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council on top of the scale. Further investigation is necessary to find out how the governments of other low-income countries may have handled the situation wisely and gained the trust of their publics. This may help convey a clearer picture to Arab governments that have suffered during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Arabs , COVID-19/epidemiology , Government , Humans , Lebanon/epidemiology , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2
2.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 43(Suppl 3): iii1-iii11, 2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607646

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to compare knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) regarding COVID-19 between public health workers (PHWs) attended field epidemiology training program (FETP-trained) and those who did not attend FETP (non-FETP trained). METHODS: Multi-country cross-sectional survey was conducted among PHWs who participated in COVID-19 pandemic in 10 countries at EMR. Online questionnaire that included demographic information, KAP regarding COVID-19 pandemic was distributed among HCWs. Scoring system was used to quantify the answers, bivariate and Multivariate analysis performed to compare FETP-trained with non-FETP trained PHWs. RESULTS: Overall, 1337 PHWs participated, with 835 (62.4%) < 40 years of age, and 851 (63.6%) males. Of them, 423 (31.6%) had FETP, including that 189 (44.7%) had advanced level, 155 (36.6%) intermediate and 79 (18.7%) basic level training. Compared with non-FETP trained, FETP trained were older, having higher KAP scores. FETP participation was low in infection control, and PH laboratories. KAP mean scores for intermediate level attendees are comparable to advanced level. CONCLUSIONS: FETP-trained are having better KAP than non-FETP PHWs. Expanding the intermediate level, maintain the Rapid Response training and introduce the laboratory component are recommended to maximize the benefit from FETP. Infection control, antimicrobial resistance and coordination are areas where training should include.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 43(Suppl 3): iii34-iii42, 2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605007

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers (HCWs) fighting against the COVID-19 pandemic are under incredible pressure, which puts them at risk of developing mental health problems. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and stress among HCWs responding to COVID-19 and its associated factors. METHODS: A multi-country cross-sectional study was conducted during July-August 2020 among HCWs responding to COVID-19 in nine Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) countries. Data were collected using an online questionnaire administered using KoBo Toolbox. Mental problems were assessed using the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21). RESULTS: A total of 1448 HCWs from nine EMR countries participated in this study. About 51.2% were male and 52.7% aged ≤ 30 years. Of all HCWs, 57.5% had depression, 42.0% had stress, and 59.1% had anxiety. Considering the severity, 19.2%, 16.1%, 26.6% of patients had severe to extremely severe depression, stress, and anxiety, respectively. Depression, stress, anxiety, and distress scores were significantly associated with participants' residency, having children, preexisting psychiatric illness, and being isolated for COVID-19. Furthermore, females, those working in a teaching hospital, and specialists had significantly higher depression and stress scores. Married status, current smoking, diabetes mellitus, having a friend who died with COVID-19, and high COVID-19 worry scores were significantly associated with higher distress scores. CONCLUSIONS: Mental problems were prevalent among HCWs responding to COVID-19 in EMR. Therefore, special interventions to promote mental well-being among HCWs responding to COVID-19 need to be immediately implemented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Epidemiol Glob Health ; 12(1): 7-12, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605762

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Children vaccination is a key intervention for their survival, especially among refugees. Yet, children vaccination registration is done manually in refugees camps and there is no possibility to send reminders to parents to come back on time. We aimed to boost the parental registration of children's vaccination records on a Children Immunization app (CIMA) while also availing the parents with useful parenting skills under COVID-19-related stress. METHODS: We incorporated United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Parenting Skills under COVID-19 information material, through CIMA in Arabic and English languages. We recruited 1100 children in February-March 2021, through a community health promotion dissemination approach. A team of two nurses from the local population and two volunteers (one trained nurse and one trained social worker), from the camp, was formed. They promoted the CIMA app at two clinics and through households visits in Zaatari refugee camp. Qualitative data on impressions and observations of the interactions with the Zaatari camp community were also collected. RESULTS: A total of 1100 children, up to 15 months of age, eligible for vaccination were enrolled in CIMA, whereby the staff explained the content of the app in terms of vaccination schedule, health promotion materials for vaccination and parenting skills to their caregivers. During the household visits, the volunteers identified a total of 70 children that have incomplete history of vaccination records (n = 42/70 girls, 60%). Also, opportunities and challenges for scaling the app were documented. CONCLUSION: The scaling of CIMA as an innovative means of dissemination of risk and health information in challenging context such as refugee camps was feasible. In the context of vaccination needs for children, in refugee settings, such a need is more eminent, particularly in the context of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Applications , Refugees , Social Capital , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Female , Humans , Jordan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Parents , SARS-CoV-2 , Smartphone , Vaccination
5.
Future Sci OA ; 8(1): FSO762, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511882

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aimed to determine the compliance of healthcare workers (HCWs) with the hospital safety measures and the prevalence of hospital-acquired COVID-19 infection among them. METHODOLOGY: HCWs at King Abdullah University Hospital (KAUH) assigned for COVID-19 patients between 18 March and 10 June 2020 were tested for past infection using total anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin assay, demographic data and compliance with safety measures were assessed using a questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 340 HCWs participated in the study, 260 were close direct care. Three HCWs tested positive for total anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin. Close direct care were more compliant with personal protective guidelines than those providing direct care. CONCLUSION: HCWs compliance with personal protective guidelines might explain the low prevalence of COVID-19 infection in hospital settings.

6.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 43(Suppl 3): iii19-iii28, 2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470167

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Iraq has been exceptionally challenged by the COVID-19 pandemic due to the already exhausted healthcare system. OBJECTIVES: To describe the epidemiological situation of COVID-19 in Iraq, the government's response to the pandemic, and provide recommendations for further action. METHODS: A desk review of secondary data using the available reports on the epidemiological situation in Iraq as well as official governmental sources was conducted. RESULTS: The major surge in the number of COVID-19 cases occurred in the first week of June and continued to increase dramatically until mid-October when a significant decrease happened. With a few exceptions, the reproductive number R has been consistently above 1. Patients aged 30-39 years (25.6%) were the most affected, while those aged 60-69 years (26.7%) had the highest deaths rates. Iraq tried to contain the pandemic through several regulations: border control, enforcing curfew, mask-wearing, and social distancing, COVID-19 isolation centers, expanding lab capacity, contact tracing, as well as several supportive economic measures. However, the extent of implementing these regulations is questionable. CONCLUSION: Additional administrative and scientific measures with special emphasis on handling mass gathering, coordination with media and better training of healthcare workers particularly on infection prevention and control.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Iraq/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 43(Suppl 3): iii29-iii33, 2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440646

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is no prior study of the effect of mobility-limiting measures on the occurrence of COVID-19 in Iraq. OBJECTIVES: To determine the relationship between publicly available mobility index data and the growth ratio (GR) of COVID-19. METHOD: We used Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports to extract Iraq's mobility data and the official Ministry of Health COVID-19 statements. We used the data to calculate the Pearson's correlation coefficient and fit a linear regression model to determine the relationship between percentage change from the baseline in the mobility indices and the GR of COVID-19 in Iraq. RESULTS: There was a moderate positive correlation between each of the mobility indices except the residential index and COVID-19 GR in Iraq. The general linear model indicated that as each of the mobility indices increases by one unit, the GR of COVID19 increases by 0.002-0.003 except for the residential index. As the residential mobility index increases by one unit, the GR decreases by 0.009. All the findings were statistically significant (P-value < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Mobility-limiting measures may be able to reduce the growth rate of COVID-19 moderately. Accordingly, mobility-limiting measures should be combined with other public control measures particularly mass mask use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Correlation of Data , Humans , Iraq , Population Dynamics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 43(Suppl 3): iii43-iii48, 2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440643

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Inadvertent delays in access to appropriate therapeutic interventions in high-risk group coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients contribute to mortality in patients with severe/critical disease presentation. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of timely admission to the hospital on mortality of patients with severe/critical COVID-19. Another secondary aspect of this study was to observe the efficacy of time-dependent use of corticosteroids on mortality of critical/severe COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Clinical data of 659 patients with severe/critical COVID-19, admitted to four major tertiary care hospitals from the Islamabad-Rawalpindi region of Pakistan was retrospectively collected from a period February-August 2020. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out to determine the predictors of mortality in severe/critical COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: Out of a total of 659 patients, 469 (71.2%) patients died. Age > 60 years, presence of hypertension, heart disease and kidney disease along with late admission (>5 days) were significant predictors of mortality in patients with severe/critical COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: The study highlights the importance of well-timed provision of appropriate medical interventions control COVID-19-associated mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization , Humans , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Steroids
9.
Int J Clin Pediatr Dent ; 13(Suppl 1): S125-S131, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280873

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess the knowledge and confidence of dentists related to behavior management with extra personal protective equipment (PPE), non-aerosol-generating dental procedures in the course of the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was conducted among a sample of dentists who worked in Jordan and India in June 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: This study included a total of 177 dentists in Jordan and India that were practicing during the early months of the pandemic. Most dentists were seeing <6 patients per day. The most common emergency treatments during the pandemic by Jordanian dentists were abscesses (51.8%) and cellulitis (44.6%) vs (44.6%) abscesses and (35.5%) pulpitis in India. There was a high adoption of all elements of the PPE protocol. Most participants never or rarely used N2O sedation to manage their patients in Jordan and India (80.4 and 71.1%), respectively. Participants in Jordan and India that considered treatment non-aerosol-generating procedures (non-AGP) were (82.1 vs 97.5%, p = 0.000), respectively. CONCLUSION: Most of the surveyed dentists believe the extra PPE acts as a barrier to patient communication and child behavior management and would consider modifying the PPE to be more child-friendly. Most dentists consider non-AGP procedures and silver diamine fluoride (SDF) to be practical ways to practice safer dentistry, yet more training and information is needed for dentists treating children to provide a more confident safe environment for both dentists and their patients. HOW TO CITE THIS ARTICLE: Alsaleh MM, Sabbarini JM, Al-Batayneh OB, et al. Changes in Behavior Management and Treatment Modalities in Pediatric Dentistry during COVID-19 Pandemic. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2020;13(S-1):S125-S131.

10.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(5): e28594, 2021 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261327

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the first reports of COVID-19 infection, the foremost requirement has been to identify a treatment regimen that not only fights the causative agent but also controls the associated complications of the infection. Due to the time-consuming process of drug discovery, physicians have used readily available drugs and therapies for treatment of infections to minimize the death toll. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to provide a snapshot analysis of the major drugs used in a cohort of 1562 Pakistani patients during the period from May to July 2020, when the first wave of COVID-19 peaked in Pakistan. METHODS: A retrospective observational study was performed to provide an overview of the major drugs used in a cohort of 1562 patients with COVID-19 admitted to the four major tertiary-care hospitals in the Rawalpindi-Islamabad region of Pakistan during the peak of the first wave of COVID-19 in the country (May-July 2020). RESULTS: Antibiotics were the most common choice out of all the therapies employed, and they were used as first line of treatment for COVID-19. Azithromycin was the most prescribed drug for treatment. No monthly trend was observed in the choice of antibiotics, and these drugs appeared to be a random but favored choice throughout the months of the study. It was also noted that even antibiotics used for multidrug resistant infections were prescribed irrespective of the severity or progression of the infection. The results of the analysis are alarming, as this approach may lead to antibiotic resistance and complications in immunocompromised patients with COVID-19. A total of 1562 patients (1064 male, 68.1%, and 498 female, 31.9%) with a mean age of 47.35 years (SD 17.03) were included in the study. The highest frequency of patient hospitalizations occurred in June (846/1562, 54.2%). CONCLUSIONS: Guidelines for a targeted treatment regime are needed to control related complications and to limit the misuse of antibiotics in the management of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pakistan/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers
11.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(5): e27609, 2021 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234631

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is known to cause severe bilateral pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome or COVID-19 in patients, which can be debilitating and even fatal. With no drugs or vaccines available yet, a wide range of treatment regimens used are being repurposed. The need of the hour is to analyze various currently available regimens and devise a treatment plan that is most effective for COVID-19. Here we describe the case of a 68-year-old man with hypertension and diabetes, exhibiting symptoms of cough and shortness of breath, who presented at the emergency department of our hospital. Chest computed tomography revealed bilateral ground glass opacities that were indicative of COVID-19, and a computed tomography score of 24 was indicative of severe pulmonary pneumonia. He tested positive for COVID-19. His treatment regimen included the use of convalescent plasma, oxygen therapy, steroids, high-dose antibiotics, broad-spectrum antiviral remdesivir, and anti-interleukin-6 monoclonal antibody (Tocilizumab) at various stages of the disease. Oxygen supplementation was required at the time of admission. The patient initially developed a cytokine release storm, and oxygen supplementation was initiated to manage his condition. Supportive care and multiple treatment regimens were used to successfully recover the patient's health. With a rapid increase in number of confirmed cases worldwide, COVID-19 has become a major challenge to our health care system. With no available vaccines currently, the establishment of a combination of therapeutic drugs that effectively reduce disease progression is of utmost importance.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Aged , Alanine/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Male , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Health Secur ; 19(3): 280-287, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1214454

ABSTRACT

The Arba'een pilgrimage in Iraq is now the largest annual gathering in a single place worldwide. To monitor and address the health needs of pilgrims in field clinics near the pilgrimage route, a syndromic surveillance system was designed and implemented by Global Health Development/Eastern Mediterranean Public Health Network in collaboration with Iraq Ministry of Health. This study aimed to analyze the effectiveness of the surveillance system and the data it gathered in evaluating the burden of common acute and infectious conditions, chronic conditions, and trauma and injuries during the Arba'een pilgrimage in 2018. Data were collected at 152 field clinics located across 11 governorates in Iraq at strategic points along the Arba'een pilgrimage route from all governorates to Karbala between October 8 and November 3, 2018. A team of 24 surveillance supervisors trained, oversaw, and provided technical support for 304 data collectors. The data collectors recorded data from 338,399 patients (42.5% female and 57.5% male) in the span of 26 days. The vast majority of patients were from Iraq (n = 294,260, 87.6%) and Iran (n = 34,691, 10.3%). Of the 338,399 patients whose data were recorded by the surveillance system, 246,469 (72.8%) reported acute and infectious conditions, 202,032 (59.70%) reported chronic conditions, and 6,737 (2.0%) reported traumas and injuries. Many patients reported several conditions in multiple categories. The most prevalent acute condition treated was influenza-like illness, identified through patients exhibiting a combination of fever and cough symptoms. Findings from this study will help inform future planning efforts so healthcare workers can be better prepared for treating such cases at mass gatherings. With the latest challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, preparations for a possible future outbreak of the novel coronavirus are also discussed. The information from this study serves as a foundation to inform and optimize future planning of wide-scale surveillance efforts and address challenges in health service delivery and health security.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Crowding , Pandemics/prevention & control , Travel/statistics & numerical data , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Epidemiological Monitoring , Female , Humans , Iran , Iraq , Male , Public Health , Saudi Arabia
13.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 8871287, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159878

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Facility-based death review committee (DRC) of neonatal deaths and stillbirths can encourage stakeholders to enhance the quality of care during the antenatal period and labour to improve birth outcomes. To understand the benefits and impact of the DRCs, this study was aimed at exploring the DRC members' perception about the role and benefits of the newly developed facility-based DRCs in five pilot hospitals in Jordan, to assess women empowerment, decision-making process, power dynamics, culture and genderism as contributing factors for deaths, and impact of COVID-19 lockdown on births. METHODS: A descriptive study of a qualitative design-using focus group discussions-was conducted after one year of establishing DRCs in 5 pilot large hospitals. The number of participants in each focus group ranged from 8 to10, and the total number of participants was 45 HCPs (nurses and doctors). Questions were consecutively asked in each focus group. The moderator asked the main questions from the guide and then used probing as needed. A second researcher observed the conversation and took field notes. RESULTS: Overall, there was an agreement among the majority of DRC members across all hospitals that the DRC was successful in identifying the exact cause of neonatal deaths and stillbirths as well as associated modifiable factors. There was also a consensus that the DRC contributed to an improvement in health services provided for pregnant women and newborns as well as protecting human rights and enabling women to be more interdependent in taking decisions related to family planning. Moreover, the DRC agreed that a proportion of the neonatal deaths and stillbirths occurring in the hospitals could have been prevented if adequate antenatal care was provided and some traditional harmful practices were avoided. CONCLUSIONS: Facility-based neonatal death review audit is practical and can be used to identify exact causes of maternal and neonatal deaths and is a valuable tool for hospital quality indicators. It can also change the perception and practice of health care providers, which may be reflected in improving the quality of provided healthcare services.


Subject(s)
Advisory Committees , Attitude to Health , COVID-19 , Perinatal Death , Stillbirth , Advisory Committees/organization & administration , Decision Making , Female , Focus Groups , Health Personnel , Hospitals , Human Rights , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infection Control/methods , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Jordan , Perinatal Death/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , Prenatal Care
14.
Arch Public Health ; 79(1): 29, 2021 Mar 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119441

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Jordan Stillbirths and Neonatal Deaths Surveillance system (JSANDS) is a newly developed system and is currently implemented in five large hospitals in Jordan. This study aimed at exploring the healthcare professionals' perception about the usability of JSANDS. METHODS: A descriptive qualitative approach, using focus group discussions, was adopted. A total of 5 focus groups including 23 focal points were conducted in five participating hospitals in Jordan. RESULTS: Data analysis identified nine main issues related to the JSANDS system: the system usefulness, the system performance, data quality, the system limitations, human rights, female empowerment, nurses' competencies strengthened, the sustainability of the JSANDS, and COVID-19 impact on the system. Users reported that JSANDS data were useful, the system was simple and easy to use, and the data were accurate and complete. However, some users reported that some technical issues need to be enhanced. CONCLUSIONS: JSANDS was perceived positively by the current users. According to them, it provides a formative and comprehensive data on stillbirths and neonatal deaths and their causes, and therefore, was recommended to be adopted by its users and scaled up.

16.
Eur J Dent ; 14(S 01): S50-S55, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-998016

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess knowledge, attitude, and infection control measures related to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic outbreak among Jordanian health care students. Besides, their social behavior and stress level regarding COVID-19 infection were assessed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An online questionnaire was distributed to medical, dental, pharmacy, nursing, and applied health science students in Jordan during the COVID-19 outbreak quarantine in March 2020. The questionnaire comprised 38 questions assessing demographic data, knowledge, attitude, risk perception, and stress level toward COVID-19. Questions regarding infection control measures and social behavior after the quarantine were also included. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Independent samples t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and chi-square at a significance level of 5% were used for data analysis. RESULTS: A total number of 935 responses were collected. The knowledge score of 55.72% of participants was satisfactory and it was higher for the clinical years' students compared with the basic years' students (p = 0.000) (descending order: sixth year > fifth year > fourth year > third year > first year > second year). Also, knowledge scores were significantly higher for medical and dental students than other disciplines (descending order: medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing/applied) (p = 0.000). The social media (89.1%) and TV or radio (69.5%) were mainly routes through which participants heard about COVID-19. Moderate and justifiable feelings about COVID-19 were found in the majority of the participants. CONCLUSION: Although the majority of students showed good knowledge scores, few of them appeared to have a serious lack of knowledge. Therefore, proper education and mentoring are necessary for students before reopening the university campuses.

17.
Psychol. Trauma Theory Res. Pract. Policy ; 5(12): 511-514, 2020.
Article in English | WHO COVID, ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-646333

ABSTRACT

We have presented an overview about the mental health situation in Jordan during the coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) in general, and we presented the situation of mental health and the provided support for Syrian refugees at the Zaatari camp.

18.
Ann Med Surg (Lond) ; 2020 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597662

ABSTRACT

This article has been withdrawn at the request of the author(s) and/or editor. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/article-withdrawal.

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