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1.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-314013

ABSTRACT

Background: Enhanced coagulation in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients is considered a major obstacle for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), but systematic analyses are sparse. We compared filter survival and citrate-induced complications during CRRT with regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) in COVID-19 and Non-COVID-19 patients. Methods: : In this retrospective study we included all consecutive adult patients (n=97) with acute kidney injury (AKI) treated with RCA-CRRT at seven ICUs of a tertiary university hospital over the tree month period. Medical data were collected to compare the efficacy and complications of RCA-CRRT between COVID-19 (n=44) and Non-COVID-19 patients (n=53). Results: : There was no significant difference in the number of CRRT filters used per patient in COVID-19 vs. Non-COVID-19 patients (median 5 vs 3 filters, p=0.103). Mean filter run-time was significantly higher in COVID-19 patients compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (68.4 (95%CI 67.0-69.9) vs. 65.2 (95%CI 63.2-67.2) hours, respectively;log-rank 0.014). COVID-19 patients showed significantly higher activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) throughout the CRRT due to systemic anticoagulation compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (54 (IQR 45 – 61) vs. 47 (IQR 41 - 58) seconds, respectively;p<0.001). A significantly higher incidence of combined metabolic disturbances (metabolic alkalosis, hypercalcemia and hypernatremia), consistent with reduced filter patency and citrate overload during RCA, was observed in COVID-19 patients compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (19.1% vs. 12.7%, respectively;p=0.04). These metabolic disarrangements were resistant to per-protocol adjustments and disappeared after replacement of the CRRT-filter. Conclusions: : In contrast to initial concerns, adequate filter life-span can be achieved with RCA during CRRT in COVID-19 patients. However, close monitoring of the acid-base balance appears warranted, as these patients tend to develop reduced filter patency leading to a higher incidence of citrate overload and metabolic disturbances. Trial Registration (local authority): EA1/285/20 (Ethikkommission der Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin);date of registration 08.10.2020.

2.
Crit Care Med ; 50(6): 964-976, 2022 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684855

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of extracorporeal cytokine reduction by CytoSorb (CytoSorbents, Monmouth Junction, NJ) on COVID-19-associated vasoplegic shock. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized controlled pilot study. SETTING: Eight ICUs at three sites of the tertiary-care university hospital Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin. PATIENTS: COVID-19 patients with vasoplegic shock requiring norepinephrine greater than 0.2 µg/kg/min, C-reactive protein greater than 100 mg/L, and indication for hemodialysis. INTERVENTIONS: Randomization of 1:1 to receive CytoSorb for 3-7 days or standard therapy. To account for inadvertent removal of antibiotics, patients in the treatment group received an additional dose at each adsorber change. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The primary endpoint was time until resolution of vasoplegic shock, estimated by Cox-regression. Secondary endpoints included mortality, interleukin-6 concentrations, and catecholamine requirements. The study was registered in the German Registry of Clinical Trials (DRKS00021447). From November 2020 to March 2021, 50 patients were enrolled. Twenty-three patients were randomized to receive CytoSorb and 26 patients to receive standard of care. One patient randomized to cytokine adsorption was excluded due to withdrawal of informed consent. Resolution of vasoplegic shock was observed in 13 of 23 patients (56.5%) in the CytoSorb and 12 of 26 patients (46.2%) in the control group after a median of 5 days (interquartile range [IQR], 4-5 d) and 4 days (IQR, 3-5 d). The hazard ratio (HR) for the primary endpoint, adjusted for the predefined variables age, gender, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation-therapy, or time from shock onset to study inclusion was HR, 1.23 (95% CI, 0.54-2.79); p = 0.63. The mortality rate was 78% in the CytoSorb and 73% in the control group (unadjusted HR, 1.17 [95% CI, 0.61-2.23]; p = 0.64). The effects on inflammatory markers, catecholamine requirements, and the type and rates of adverse events were similar between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: In severely ill COVID-19 patients, CytoSorb did not improve resolution of vasoplegic shock or predefined secondary endpoints.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Shock , COVID-19/therapy , Cytokines , Humans , Multiple Organ Failure/therapy , Norepinephrine , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , Research Design , Treatment Outcome
3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-296076

ABSTRACT

Background: Several observations indicate a hyperinflammatory state in severely ill COVID-19 patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of extracorporeal cytokine elimination by CytoSorb® on COVID-19 associated vasoplegic shock.<br><br>Methods: In this prospective randomised pilot study COVID-19 patients with vasoplegic shock requiring norepinephrine >0·2 µg/kg/min, CRP >100 mg/L and indication for hemodialysis were randomised 1:1 to receive CytoSorb® treatment for 3-7 days or standard of care. The primary endpoint was time until resolution of vasoplegic shock, estimated by a Cox-regression model. Secondary endpoints included mortality, serum interleukin-6 concentrations, and catecholamine requirements. The study was registered in the German Registry of Clinical Trials (DRKS00021447).<br><br>Findings: From November 2020 to March 2021, 50 patients were enrolled of which 23 patients were randomised to receive CytoSorb® treatment and 26 patients to receive standard of care. One patient randomised to cytokine adsorption was excluded due to withdrawal of informed consent. Resolution of vasoplegic shock was observed in 13 (56·5%) of 23 patients in the CytoSorb® and 12 (46·2%) of 26 patients in the control group after a median of 5 (IQR 4-5) and 4 (IQR 3-5) days, respectively. The hazard ratio (HR) for the primary endpoint, adjusted for the predefined variables age, gender, ECMO-therapy, or time from shock onset to study inclusion was HR 1·23 (95%CI: 0·54-2·79), p=0·63). The mortality rate was 78% in the CytoSorb® and 73% in the control group (unadjusted HR 1·17 (95%CI: 0·61-2.23), p=0·64). The effects on inflammatory markers and catecholamine requirements and the type and rates of adverse events were similar in the two groups.<br><br>Interpretation: In this pilot trial in severely ill COVID-19 patients CytoSorb® treatment did not improve resolution of vasoplegic shock as compared to standard treatment. Mortality rates, catecholamine requirements, inflammatory markers and adverse events did not differ between the two groups.<br><br>Trial Registration: The study was registered in the German Registry of Clinical Trials (DRKS00021447<br><br>Funding: Internal university funds<br><br>Declaration of Interest: HS, LJL, MP, TK, PT, FS, KUE, SK, JVK, MO, AKrü, A Kra, KB declare no conflicts of interest. PE received honoraria from GSK and AstraZeneca and filed two patents for novel urinary biomarkers outside the submitted work. ST received research funding and honoraria for workshops and lectures from Orionpharma. He additionally received honoraria for workshops and lectures from Edwards and honoraria for lectures from Amomed and Smith&Nephews. CS received grants from: Drägerwerk AG& Co.KGaA;German Reseach Society;German Aerospace Center;Einstein Foundation Berlin;Federal Joint Committee (G-BA);Inner University grants;Project Management Agency;Non-Profit Promoting Science and Education;European Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care;Baxter Deutschland GmbH;Cytosorbents Europe GmbH;Edwards Lifsciences Germany GmbH;Fresenius Medical Care;Grünenthal GmbH;Massimo Europe Ltd.;Pfizer Pharma PFE GmbH;Georg Thieme Verlag, Dr. F Köhler Chemie GmbH;Sintetica GmbH;Stifterverband für die deutsche Wissenschaft e.V./Philips;Stiftung Charié;AGUETTANT Deutschland GmbH;AbbVie Deutschland GmbH & Co.KG;Amomed Pharma GmbH;InTouch Health;Copra System GmbH;Correvio GmbH;Max Plank Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften e.V.;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie & Intensivmedizin (DGAI);Stifterverband für die Deutsche Wissenschaft e.V./Medtronic;Philipps ElectronicsNederland BV;BMG, BMBF, German Research Society all outside the submitted work. In addition, CS has different patents. DK received fees for speaking at a symposia organized on behalf of Fresenius Medical Care AG, Germany.<br><br>Ethical Approval: The original protocol and the changes were approved by the local ethics<br>committee (EA1/069/20).

4.
J Crit Care ; 67: 126-131, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509976

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We compared filter survival and citrate-induced complications during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) with regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) in COVID-19 and Non-COVID-19 patients. METHODS: In this retrospective study we included all consecutive adult patients (n = 97) treated with RCA-CRRT. Efficacy and complications of RCA-CRRT were compared between COVID-19 and Non-COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: Mean filter run-time was significantly higher in COVID-19 patients compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (68.4 (95%CI 67.0-69.9) vs. 65.2 (95%CI 63.2-67.2) hours, respectively; log-rank 0.014). COVID-19 patients showed significantly higher activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) throughout the CRRT due to intensified systemic anticoagulation compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (54 (IQR 45-61) vs. 47 (IQR 41-58) seconds, respectively; p < 0.001). A significantly higher incidence of metabolic alkalosis, hypercalcemia and hypernatremia, consistent with reduced filter patency and citrate overload, was observed in COVID-19 patients compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (19.1% vs. 12.7%, respectively; p = 0.04). These metabolic disarrangements were resistant to per-protocol adjustments and disappeared after replacement of the CRRT-filter. CONCLUSIONS: RCA-CRRT in COVID-19 patients with intensified systemic anticoagulation provides an adequate filter lifespan. However, close monitoring of the acid-base balance appears warranted, as these patients tend to develop reduced filter patency leading to a higher incidence of citrate overload and metabolic disturbances. TRIAL REGISTRATION (LOCAL AUTHORITY): EA1/285/20 (Ethikkommission der Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin); date of registration 08.10.2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Citrates , Citric Acid/adverse effects , Critical Illness , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Eur J Immunol ; 52(1): 138-148, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1479399

ABSTRACT

The interferon pathway, a key antiviral defense mechanism, is being considered as a therapeutic target in COVID-19. Both, substitution of interferon and JAK/STAT inhibition to limit cytokine storms have been proposed. However, little is known about possible abnormalities in STAT signaling in immune cells during SARS-CoV-2 infection. We investigated downstream targets of interferon signaling, including STAT1, STAT2, pSTAT1 and 2, and IRF1, 7 and 9 by flow cytometry in 30 patients with COVID-19, 17 with mild, and 13 with severe infection. We report upregulation of STAT1 and IRF9 in mild and severe COVID-19 cases, which correlated with the IFN-signature assessed by Siglec-1 (CD169) expression on peripheral monocytes. Interestingly, Siglec-1 and STAT1 in CD14+ monocytes and plasmablasts showed lower expression among severe cases compared to mild cases. Contrary to the baseline STAT1 expression, the phosphorylation of STAT1 was enhanced in severe COVID-19 cases, indicating a dysbalanced JAK/STAT signaling that fails to induce transcription of interferon stimulated response elements (ISRE). This abnormality persisted after IFN-α and IFN-γ stimulation of PBMCs from patients with severe COVID-19. Data suggest impaired STAT1 transcriptional upregulation among severely infected patients may represent a potential predictive biomarker and would allow stratification of patients for certain interferon-pathway targeted treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Monocytes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , STAT1 Transcription Factor/immunology , Signal Transduction/immunology , Up-Regulation/immunology , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Interferon Regulatory Factors/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acuity , Phosphorylation/immunology
6.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 10678, 2021 05 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238016

ABSTRACT

With an urgent need for bedside imaging of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), this study's main goal was to assess inter- and intraobserver agreement in lung ultrasound (LUS) of COVID-19 patients. In this single-center study we prospectively acquired and evaluated 100 recorded ten-second cine-loops in confirmed COVID-19 intensive care unit (ICU) patients. All loops were rated by ten observers with different subspeciality backgrounds for four times by each observer (400 loops overall) in a random sequence using a web-based rating tool. We analyzed inter- and intraobserver variability for specific pathologies and a semiquantitative LUS score. Interobserver agreement for both, identification of specific pathologies and assignment of LUS scores was fair to moderate (e.g., LUS score 1 Fleiss' κ = 0.27; subpleural consolidations Fleiss' κ = 0.59). Intraobserver agreement was mostly moderate to substantial with generally higher agreement for more distinct findings (e.g., lowest LUS score 0 vs. highest LUS score 3 (median Fleiss' κ = 0.71 vs. 0.79) or air bronchograms (median Fleiss' κ = 0.72)). Intraobserver consistency was relatively low for intermediate LUS scores (e.g. LUS Score 1 median Fleiss' κ = 0.52). We therefore conclude that more distinct LUS findings (e.g., air bronchograms, subpleural consolidations) may be more suitable for disease monitoring, especially with more than one investigator and that training material used for LUS in point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) should pay refined attention to areas such as B-line quantification and differentiation of intermediate LUS scores.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Point-of-Care Systems , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Monitoring, Physiologic , Observer Variation , Prospective Studies , Ultrasonography
7.
J Clin Invest ; 130(12): 6477-6489, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021209

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has emerged as a global pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). So far, viral targets of cellular immunity and factors determining successful mounting of T cell responses are poorly defined. We therefore analyzed cellular responses to membrane, nucleocapsid, and spike proteins in individuals suffering from moderate or severe infection and in individuals who recovered from mild disease. We demonstrate that the CoV-2-specific CD4+ T helper cell response is directed against all 3 proteins with comparable magnitude, ex vivo proliferation, and portions of responding patients. However, individuals who died were more likely to have not mounted a cellular response to the proteins. Higher patient age and comorbidity index correlated with increased frequencies of CoV-2-specific CD4+ T cells, harboring higher portions of IL-2-secreting, but lower portions of IFN-γ-secreting, cells. Diminished frequencies of membrane protein-reactive IFN-γ+ T cells were particularly associated with higher acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II scores in patients admitted to intensive care. CoV-2-specific T cells exhibited elevated PD-1 expression in patients with active disease as compared with those individuals who recovered from previous mild disease. In summary, our data suggest a link between individual patient predisposition with respect to age and comorbidity and impairment of CoV-2-specific Th1-type cellular immunity, thereby supporting a concept of altered T cell function in at-risk patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interleukin-2/immunology , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Th1 Cells/immunology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/pathology , Disease Susceptibility , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Th1 Cells/pathology
8.
Journal of Clinical Investigation ; 130(12):6477-6489, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1021205

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has emerged as a global pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). So far, viral targets of cellular immunity and factors determining successful mounting of T cell responses are poorly defined. We therefore analyzed cellular responses to membrane, nucleocapsid, and spike proteins in individuals suffering from moderate or severe infection and in individuals who recovered from mild disease. We demonstrate that the CoV-2-specific CD4· T helper cell response is directed against all 3 proteins with comparable magnitude, ex vivo proliferation, and portions of responding patients. However, individuals who died were more likely to have not mounted a cellular response to the proteins. Higher patient age and comorbidity index correlated with increased frequencies of CoV-2specific CD4· T cells, harboring higher portions of IL-2-secreting, but lower portions of IFN-y-secreting, cells. Diminished frequencies of membrane protein-reactive IFN-y· T cells were particularly associated with higher acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II scores in patients admitted to intensive care. CoV-2-specific T cells exhibited elevated PD-1 expression in patients with active disease as compared with those individuals who recovered from previous mild disease. In summary, our data suggest a link between individual patient predisposition with respect to age and comorbidity and impairment of CoV-2specific Th1-type cellular immunity, thereby supporting a concept of altered T cell function in at-risk patients.

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