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1.
Clin Anat ; 2022 Sep 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2013377

ABSTRACT

The term Metaverse ("meta" defined as beyond, transcendence or virtuality, and "verse" meaning universe or world) denotes a "virtual reality space" for anatomy teaching. To ascertain how many anatomists are familiar or are using this adjunct in teaching, we conducted a short survey at the 2022 annual meeting of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA). Interestingly, only six respondents (9.4%) had used a Metaverse for teaching anatomy. Moreover, the vast majority of attendees were anatomy educators or basic science faculty, but not practicing physicians/surgeons or other actively practicing health care professionals; a group where this technology has been used much more commonly. The present manuscript was authored by anatomy educators, practicing physicians and other actively practicing health care professionals with backgrounds in diverse medical fields, that is, anatomists, medical doctors, physician assistants, dentists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, chiropractors, veterinarians, and medical students. Many of these authors have used or have been exposed to a Metaverse in the clinical realm. Therefore, the aim of the paper is to better understand those who are knowledgeable of a Metaverse and its use in anatomy education, and to provide ways forward for using such technology in this discipline.

2.
Med Sci Educ ; 32(1): 247-254, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1920405

ABSTRACT

The world has changed rapidly since the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the education community has not been immune to these changes. With abrupt school closings and a rapid transition to online teaching and learning, the educational technologies have been stretched to their limits and pedagogic approaches blossomed. As the world strives to reestablish normalcy, it will be under the influence of the long-lasting impact of the pandemic. This manuscript provides recommendations for the online conversion of anatomical sciences curricula in health sciences programs. Strategic guidelines are emerging for building on these changes to enhance teaching and learning in the current pandemic era.

3.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 14(4): 4892-4898, 2022 Feb 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1633913

ABSTRACT

This paper presents results of a study of a new cationic oligomer that contains end groups and a chromophore affording inactivation of SARS-CoV-2 by visible light irradiation in solution or as a solid coating on paper wipes and glass fiber filtration substrates. A key finding of this study is that the cationic oligomer with a central thiophene ring and imidazolium charged groups gives outstanding performance in both the killing of E. coli bacterial cells and inactivation of the virus at very short times. Our introduction of cationic N-methyl imidazolium groups enhances the light activation process for both E. coli and SARS-CoV-2 but dampens the killing of the bacteria and eliminates the inactivation of the virus in the dark. For the studies with this oligomer in solution at a concentration of 1 µg/mL and E. coli, we obtain 3 log killing of the bacteria with 10 min of irradiation with LuzChem cool white lights (mimicking indoor illumination). With the oligomer in solution at a concentration of 10 µg/mL, we observe 4 log inactivation (99.99%) in 5 min of irradiation and total inactivation after 10 min. The oligomer is quite active against E. coli on oligomer-coated paper wipes and glass fiber filter supports. The SARS-CoV-2 is also inactivated by oligomer-coated glass fiber filter papers. This study indicates that these oligomer-coated materials may be very useful as wipes and filtration materials.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/radiation effects , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Cations/pharmacology , Escherichia coli/drug effects , Escherichia coli/radiation effects , Humans , Light , Phototherapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Ultraviolet Rays , Virus Inactivation/drug effects , Virus Inactivation/radiation effects
4.
Medical science educator ; : 1-8, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1615275

ABSTRACT

The world has changed rapidly since the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the education community has not been immune to these changes. With abrupt school closings and a rapid transition to online teaching and learning, the educational technologies have been stretched to their limits and pedagogic approaches blossomed. As the world strives to reestablish normalcy, it will be under the influence of the long-lasting impact of the pandemic. This manuscript provides recommendations for the online conversion of anatomical sciences curricula in health sciences programs. Strategic guidelines are emerging for building on these changes to enhance teaching and learning in the current pandemic era.

5.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e047868, 2022 01 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605902

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a global crisis, creating an unprecedented situation, which has taken the world by storm, overshadowing on all life' aspects and having a significant impact on the health systems of most countries. In this study, the delivery of health services is investigated both before and during the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic at public hospitals in Yemen to assess the impact of COVID-19 on the utilisation of health services. METHOD: Data collected from 127 hospitals in Yemen were reviewed using the DHIS2 system. The data represented 3 months before the outbreak of COVID-19 between January and March 2020 and during the outbreak of COVID-19 outbreak between April and June 2020. The results were then compared with the same period in 2019. The utilisation pattern of healthcare services during the period of investigation was compiled and analysed by applying a generalised estimating equation (GEE) to examine the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak in Yemen. The data collected from the targeted hospitals included information related to consultations, surgeries, deliveries, C-sections and penta-3rd dose immunisation. RESULTS: The trendline of health services used during the pandemic showed a gradual decline beginning from April 2020 for consultations, surgeries and penta-3rd dose utilisation. The GEE model revealed a significant effect (p<0.05) during the outbreak compared with preoutbreak in the consultation services (B=-1,343.9; 95% CI -1,767.2 to -920.6; χ2=38.718), surgeries (B=-54.98; 95% CI -79.13 to -30.83, χ2=19.911) and penta-3rd dose (B=-24.47; 95% CI -30.56 to -18.38 and χ2=62.010). As for deliveries and C-sections, the results were shown to be statistically non-significant. CONCLUSION: The impact of COVID-19 on continuity of health services delivery in Yemen has been distinct and profound, where the study revealed that the number of the consultations, surgeries and number of vaccinated children have been declined during the COVID-19 pandemic, likely due to the partially lockdown measures taken and fear of being infected. However, the deliveries and C-section services remained nearly in the same level and did not affect by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Health Services , Hospitals, Public , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Yemen/epidemiology
6.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-294003

ABSTRACT

Introduction Assessing the risk factors for and consequences of infection with SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy is essential to guide clinical guidelines and care. Previous studies on the influence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy have been among hospitalised patients, which may have exaggerated risk estimates of severe outcomes because all cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the pregnant population were not included. The objectives of this study were to identify risk factors for and outcomes after SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy independent of severity of infection in a universally tested population, and to identify risk factors for and outcomes after severe infection requiring hospital admission. Material and Methods This was a prospective population-based cohort study in Denmark using data from the Danish National Patient Register and Danish Microbiology Database and prospectively registered data from medical records. We included all pregnancies between March 1 and October 31, 2020 and compared women with a positive SARS-CoV-2 test during pregnancy to non-infected pregnant women. Cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy were both identified prospectively and through register linkage to secure that all cases were identified and that cases were pregnant during infection. Main outcome measures were pregnancy, delivery, maternal, and neonatal outcomes. Severe infection was defined as hospital admission due to COVID-19. Results Among 82 682 pregnancies, 418 women had SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy, corresponding to an incidence of 5.1 per 1000 pregnancies, 23 (5.5%) of which required hospital admission due to COVID-19. Risk factors for infection were asthma (OR 2.19 [1.41–3.41]) and being foreign born (OR 2.12 [1.70–2.64]). Risk factors for hospital admission due to COVID-19 included obesity (OR 2.74 [1.00–7.51]), smoking (OR 4.69 [1.58–13.90]), infection after gestational age (GA) 22 weeks (GA 22–27 weeks: OR 3.77 [1.16–12.29];GA 28–36 weeks: OR 4.76 [1.60–14.12]) and having asthma (OR 4.53 [1.39–14.79]). We found no difference in any obstetric or neonatal outcomes. Conclusions Only 1 in 20 women with SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy require admission to hospital due to COVID-19. And severe outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy are rare. Key Message Population based cohort study about SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy. Asthma and foreign ethnicity were identified as risk factors for infection while obstetric outcomes did not change. Obesity, smoking, infection after GA 22, and asthma increased the risk of hospital admission.

7.
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand ; 100(11): 2097-2110, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381102

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Assessing the risk factors for and consequences of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) during pregnancy is essential to guide clinical care. Previous studies on SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy have been among hospitalized patients, which may have exaggerated risk estimates of severe outcomes because all cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the pregnant population were not included. The objectives of this study were to identify risk factors for and outcomes after SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy independent of severity of infection in a universally tested population, and to identify risk factors for and outcomes after severe infection requiring hospital admission. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a prospective population-based cohort study in Denmark using data from the Danish National Patient Register and Danish Microbiology Database and prospectively registered data from medical records. We included all pregnancies between March 1 and October 31, 2020 and compared women with a positive SARS-CoV-2 test during pregnancy to non-infected pregnant women. Cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy were both identified prospectively and through register linkage to ensure that all cases were identified and that cases were pregnant during infection. Main outcome measures were pregnancy, delivery, maternal, and neonatal outcomes. Severe infection was defined as hospital admission due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptoms. RESULTS: Among 82 682 pregnancies, 418 women had SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy, corresponding to an incidence of 5.1 per 1000 pregnancies, 23 (5.5%) of which required hospital admission due to COVID-19. Risk factors for infection were asthma (odds ratio [OR] 2.19, 95% CI 1.41-3.41) and being foreign born (OR 2.12, 95% CI 1.70-2.64). Risk factors for hospital admission due to COVID-19 included obesity (OR 2.74, 95% CI 1.00-7.51), smoking (OR 4.69, 95% CI 1.58-13.90), infection after gestational age (GA) 22 weeks (GA 22-27 weeks: OR 3.77, 95% CI 1.16-12.29; GA 28-36 weeks: OR 4.76, 95% CI 1.60-14.12), and having asthma (OR 4.53, 95% CI 1.39-14.79). We found no difference in any obstetrical or neonatal outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Only 1 in 20 women with SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy required admission to hospital due to COVID-19. Risk factors for admission comprised obesity, smoking, asthma, and infection after GA 22 weeks. Severe adverse outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy were rare.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Denmark , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Outcome , Risk Factors , Young Adult
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