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1.
Current psychology (New Brunswick, N.J.) ; : 1-17, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1813018

ABSTRACT

The present research explored individual and group level risk factors in preventive health and panic buying behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic in India. Perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, COVID-19 anxiety, and personal identity were considered individual-level risk factors. Group based identities such as family, religious groups, and identification with one’s nation were considered as group level risk factors. Standardized scales have been used to measure all the constructs under study. Data were collected electronically from 305 Indian respondents. Hierarchical regression analysis in SPSS Version 22 was used to test the hypotheses. Results showed that personal identity and identification with the nation predicted preventive health behavior. Panic buying behavior was predicted by the location of the respondents (containment versus non-containment zones), perceived severity, and one’s personal identity. The interplay of individual and social factors is reflective of both individual and collective agencies in the adoption of preventive health behaviors, while only individual-level factors led to panic buying behavior. The findings of this study have implications for curbing, managing, and reinforcing desirable and non-desirable behavior during the present pandemic as well as in the future as well.

3.
Ann Intern Med ; 175(2): 179-190, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1579932

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although most patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection can be safely managed at home, the need for hospitalization can arise suddenly. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether enrollment in an automated remote monitoring service for community-dwelling adults with COVID-19 at home ("COVID Watch") was associated with improved mortality. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort analysis. SETTING: Mid-Atlantic academic health system in the United States. PARTICIPANTS: Outpatients who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 between 23 March and 30 November 2020. INTERVENTION: The COVID Watch service consists of twice-daily, automated text message check-ins with an option to report worsening symptoms at any time. All escalations were managed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week by dedicated telemedicine clinicians. MEASUREMENTS: Thirty- and 60-day outcomes of patients enrolled in COVID Watch were compared with those of patients who were eligible to enroll but received usual care. The primary outcome was death at 30 days. Secondary outcomes included emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations. Treatment effects were estimated with propensity score-weighted risk adjustment models. RESULTS: A total of 3488 patients enrolled in COVID Watch and 4377 usual care control participants were compared with propensity score weighted models. At 30 days, COVID Watch patients had an odds ratio for death of 0.32 (95% CI, 0.12 to 0.72), with 1.8 fewer deaths per 1000 patients (CI, 0.5 to 3.1) (P = 0.005); at 60 days, the difference was 2.5 fewer deaths per 1000 patients (CI, 0.9 to 4.0) (P = 0.002). Patients in COVID Watch had more telemedicine encounters, ED visits, and hospitalizations and presented to the ED sooner (mean, 1.9 days sooner [CI, 0.9 to 2.9 days]; all P < 0.001). LIMITATION: Observational study with the potential for unobserved confounding. CONCLUSION: Enrollment of outpatients with COVID-19 in an automated remote monitoring service was associated with reduced mortality, potentially explained by more frequent telemedicine encounters and more frequent and earlier presentation to the ED. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Remote Consultation/methods , Text Messaging , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Comparative Effectiveness Research , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Home Care Services , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
4.
Death Stud ; : 1-11, 2021 Nov 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1541379

ABSTRACT

The study explored the relationship between social distancing and distress along with risk factors of social distancing. Further, online counseling/mental health services and perceived social support were tested as possible moderators between social distancing and distress. Valid and reliable measures were used to collect the data from 300 Indian respondents. Process use of social networking platforms was found to significantly explain social distancing. Online counseling/mental health services and perceived social support moderated the relationship between social distancing and distress. Only 16% of the respondents used online mental health services during the study period. Lack of awareness and acceptance of these services were major barriers.

5.
JCO Clin Cancer Inform ; 5: 1134-1140, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518337

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Patients with cancer are at greater risk of developing severe symptoms from COVID-19 than the general population. We developed and tested an automated text-based remote symptom-monitoring program to facilitate early detection of worsening symptoms and rapid assessment for patients with cancer and suspected or confirmed COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted a feasibility study of Cancer COVID Watch, an automated COVID-19 symptom-monitoring program with oncology nurse practitioner (NP)-led triage among patients with cancer between April 23 and June 30, 2020. Twenty-six patients with cancer and suspected or confirmed COVID-19 were enrolled. Enrolled patients received twice daily automated text messages over 14 days that asked "How are you feeling compared to 12 hours ago? Better, worse, or the same?" and, if worse, "Is it harder than usual for you to breathe?" Patients who responded worse and yes were contacted within 1 hour by an oncology NP. RESULTS: Mean age of patients was 62.5 years. Seventeen (65%) were female, 10 (38%) Black, and 15 (58%) White. Twenty-five (96%) patients responded to ≥ 1 symptom check-in, and overall response rate was 78%. Four (15%) patients were escalated to the triage line: one was advised to present to the emergency department (ED), and three were managed in the outpatient setting. Median time from escalation to triage call was 11.5 minutes. Four (15%) patients presented to the ED without first escalating their care via our program. Participant satisfaction was high (Net Promoter Score: 100, n = 4). CONCLUSION: Implementation of an intensive remote symptom monitoring and rapid NP triage program for outpatients with cancer and suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infection is possible. Similar tools may facilitate more rapid triage for patients with cancer in future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Text Messaging , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage
6.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 17(11): 3941-3953, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429132

ABSTRACT

This study examines people's intention to get COVID-19 vaccines and some of the psychological factors, that can facilitate the vaccination process. Using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a theoretical framework, we hypothesized that the key constructs of TPB (attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control) would explain people's intention to get COVID-19 vaccines. Belief in COVID-19-related misinformation and vaccine confidence were added to the TPB framework in order to comprehensively assess the predictors of COVID-19 vaccine intentions. Data was collected from 400 Indian respondents electronically during Feb-March, 2021. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to analyze the data. The Three components of TPB collectively explained 41% of the variance in the intention to get COVID-19 vaccines. Belief in COVID-19-related misinformation and vaccine confidence, on the other hand, had no significant impact on the intention to get COVID-19 vaccines. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Attitude , Behavior Control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Communication , Humans , India , Intention , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Community Ment Health J ; 57(1): 70-78, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064542

ABSTRACT

The role of individual variables (COVID-19 anxiety, perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, optimistic bias and personal identity) as predictors of quality of life (QoL) during the novel coronavirus or COVID-19 pandemic is explored. Impact of group related variables (identification to family, religious group and nation) on QoL is also examined. Sample comprised 305 male and female Indian respondents, aged 18 to 78 years. Standardized measures have been utilised to assess the constructs. Results revealed that QoL was significantly influenced by individual variables (COVID-19 anxiety and personal identity) and group variables (identification with family and nation). The effect of COVID-19 anxiety and personal identity as individual variables is over and above that of demographic variables on QoL. Group variables (family and national identification) significantly impacted QoL over and above the individual variables. Findings would indeed, aid in the rehabilitation and assistance of people to live in COVID-19 crisis, and thereafter.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/psychology , Optimism/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
8.
Community Ment Health J ; 57(1): 42-48, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064538

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 has caused significant distress around the globe. Apart from the evident physical symptoms in infected cases, it has caused serious damage to public mental health. India, like other countries, implemented a nationwide lockdown to contain and curb the transmission of the virus. The current research is an attempt to explore psychological distress among people residing in India during the lockdown. Four hundred and three participants were asked to complete a questionnaire with questions around symptoms of depression, anxiety, stress, and family affluence. The results indicated that people who do not have enough supplies to sustain the lockdown were most affected, and family affluence was found to be negatively correlated with stress, anxiety, and depression. Among different professions, students and healthcare professionals were found to experience stress, anxiety, and depression more than others. Despite the current situation, stress, anxiety, and depression were found to be in normal ranges for mental health professionals highlighting their capabilities to remain normal in times of distress. Policymakers and other authorities may take the assistance of mental health professionals to help overcome psychological issues related to Covid-19.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Psychological Distress , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety Disorders/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Depression/diagnosis , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Mental Health , Prevalence , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation/psychology , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Students/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
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