Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 11 de 11
Filter
1.
J Community Hosp Intern Med Perspect ; 12(4): 7-13, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081653

ABSTRACT

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome is a life-threatening condition associated with elevated inflammatory markers and multiple organ injury. A diagnosis of exclusion, it has been reported after severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection (SARS-CoV-2) in children and adults; recently it has been described in some post-COVID-19 vaccinated individuals. The prognosis with supportive care and immunomodulatory therapy is good, although some individuals may require treatment in the intensive care unit (ICU). Here we report a case of a 58-year-old man who developed multi-organ failure after receiving the second dose of the Moderna mRNA-1273 COVID-19 vaccine. He required critical organ support in the ICU. An extensive workup was done to rule out alternative infectious and inflammatory processes. Following a period of gradual in-hospital convalescence, our patient made a full recovery. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensively described case of multisystem inflammatory syndrome associated with Moderna mRNA-1273 COVID-19 vaccine in an adult over 50 years of age.

2.
Hosp Pract (1995) ; 50(4): 326-330, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997024

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic severely restricted in-person learning. As a result, many educational institutions switched to online platforms to continue teaching. COVID-19 webinars have been useful for rapidly disseminating information to frontline healthcare workers. While conducting COVID-19 webinars through online platforms is a popular method to train medical professionals, their effectiveness has never been investigated. Our aim was to ascertain the usefulness of COVID-19 webinars during the pandemic. METHODS: We conducted an online survey of about 400 frontline healthcare workers. 112 people responded to the survey (response rate = 28%). In it, we asked several questions to determine whether webinars had been a useful resource to help deal with COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: We found that a majority of healthcare worker respondents had favorable opinions of online education during the pandemic as around 78% of respondents either agreed or highly agreed that webinars are a useful source of knowledge. A significant proportion (34%) did not participate in webinars and gave time constraints as their main reason for not participating. CONCLUSION: Our results indicated that while online education is a great way to disseminate information quickly to a large amount of people, it also comes with its disadvantages. As we transition into a post-pandemic world, we need to make sure that online teaching is designed with the best interests of the healthcare workers in mind to ensure that we get the most out of it.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Cureus ; 14(5): e25065, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1884696

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has turned into a global healthcare challenge, causing significant morbidity and mortality.Healthcare workers (HCWs) who are on the frontline of the COVID-19 outbreak response face an increased risk of contracting the disease. Some common challenges encountered by HCWs include exposure to the pathogen, psychological distress, and long working hours. In addition, HCWs may be more prone to develop mental health issues such as anxiety, depression, suicidal thoughts, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), sleep disorders, and drug addictions compared to the general population. These issues arise from increased job stress, fear of spreading the disease to loved ones, and potential discrimination or stigma associated with the disease. This study aims to review the current literature to explore the effects of COVID-19 on healthcare providers' physical and mental well-being and suggest interventional strategies to combat these issues. To that end, we performed a literature search on Google Scholar and PubMed databases using combinations of the following keywords and synonyms: "SARS-CoV-2", "Healthcare-worker", "COVID-19", "Well-being", "Wellness", "Depression", "Anxiety", and "PTSD."

4.
Cureus ; 14(4): e24042, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1847663

ABSTRACT

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS) after a primary infection with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was first recognized in 2020 and presents with similar symptoms as Kawasaki disease, toxic shock syndrome, and macrophage activation syndrome/secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. In children, it is called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C); in adults, it is termed multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A). This case offers a unique presentation of MIS in a 20-year-old young adult, who turned 21 years old one week after his presentation. He fits the criteria for MIS-C and MIS-A according to the Centers for Disease Control and World Health Organization, respectively. Initial symptoms in the emergency department included headache, neck stiffness, and fever with diffuse rash. Other symptoms consistent with MIS-C/A developed rapidly later during the course of the disease.

5.
Infez Med ; 30(1): 51-58, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1772289

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has markedly affected the health care of patients in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), but no systematic study to corroborate this effect has been undertaken. In addition, the survival outcomes of patients with COVID-19 who received invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) have not been well established. We pooled evidence from all available studies and did a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess and compare mortality outcomes between LMICs and high-income countries (HICs). We searched MEDLINE and the University of Michigan Library according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines from December 1, 2019, to July 15, 2021, for case-control studies, cohort studies, and brief reports that discussed mortality ratios and survival outcomes among patients with SARS-CoV-2 who received IMV. We excluded studies and case reports without comparison groups, narrative reviews, and preprints. A random-effects estimate of the arcsine square root transformation (PAS) of each outcome was generated with the DerSimonian-Laird method. Seven eligible studies, consisting of 243,835 patients with COVID-19, were included. We identified a significantly higher mortality rate (i.e., a larger PAS) among the patients receiving IMV in LMICs (PAS, 0.754; 95% CI, 0.569-0.900; P<.001) compared to patients in HICs (PAS, 0.588; 95% CI, 0.263-0.876; P<.001). Considerable heterogeneity was present within the individual subgroups possibly because of the extent of the included studies, which had data from specific countries and states but not from individual hospitals or health care centers. Moreover, the sample population in each study was diverse. Meta-regression showed that a higher mortality rate among patients with COVID-19 who received IMV in both HICs (P<.001) and LMICs (P=.04) was associated with chronic pulmonary disease. Our study suggests that chronic pulmonary diseases and poor demographics lead to a worse prognosis among patients with COVID-19 who received IMV. Moreover, the survival outcome is worse in LMICs, where health care systems are usually understaffed and poorly financed.

6.
Infez Med ; 30(1): 1-10, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1772284

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to unanticipated pressures on all aspects of human life. Multiple approaches to eliciting protective immunity must be rapidly evaluated. Numerous efforts have been made to develop an effective vaccine for this novel coronavirus, resulting in a race for vaccine development. To combat COVID-19, all nations must focus their efforts on widespread vaccination with an effective and safe vaccine. Globally, concerns about potential long-term adverse effects of vaccines have led to some apprehension about vaccine use. A vaccine's adverse effect has an integral role in the public's confidence and vaccine uptake. This article reviews the current primary literature regarding adverse effects associated with different COVID-19 vaccines in use worldwide.

7.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:93-93, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1591955

ABSTRACT

It is unclear that this post vaccination MIS is the same as post SARS-COV-2 MIS-A and MIS-C. Future research into the potential pathophysiological mechanisms are important as the vaccine is now universally recommended. After ruling out all potential differential diagnosis including infectious, vasculitis, thrombotic, and immune etiology, a diagnosis of MIS secondary to mRNA Covid-19 vaccination was made and reported to the CDC. B Introduction: b Multisystem inflammation syndrome (MIS) is a condition characterized by fever, multi organ dysfunction, elevated inflammatory markers and temporally associated with COVID-19 infection. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

8.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:89-89, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1590881

ABSTRACT

Sino-nasal mucormycosis was predominant and affected 24 (61%) patients, 7 (18%) patients had rhino-cerebral Mucormycosis, and 5 (13%) patient had additional peripheral nervous system involvement. B Objective: b Mucormycosis is not a new diagnosis but it has high incidence among COVID-19 patients in India during second wave of pandemic. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

9.
Infez Med ; 29(4): 495-503, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1579089

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: To date, only corticosteroids and interleukin-6 (IL-6) inhibitors have been shown to reduce mortality of hospitalized patients with COVID-19. In this literature review, we aimed to summarize infection risk of IL inhibitors, with or without the use of corticosteroids, used to treat hospitalized patients with COVID-19. METHODS: A literature search was conducted using the following evidence-based medicine reviews: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews; Embase; Ovid Medline; and Epub Ahead of Print, In-Process, In-Data-Review & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Daily and Versions 1946 to April 28, 2021. All relevant articles were identified using the search terms COVID-19 or SARS-coronavirus-2, infections, interleukins, inpatients, adults, and i ncidence. RESULTS: We identified 36 studies of which 2 were meta-analyses, 5 were randomized controlled trials, 9 were prospective studies, and 20 were retrospective studies. When anakinra was compared with control, 2 studies reported an increased risk of infection, and 3 studies reported a similar or decreased incidence of infection. Canakinumab had a lower associated incidence of infection compared with placebo in one study. When sarilumab was compared with placebo, one study reported an increased risk of infection. Nine studies comparing tocilizumab with placebo reported decreased or no difference in infection risk (odds ratio [OR] for the studies ranged from 0.39-1.21). Fourteen studies comparing tocilizumab with placebo reported an increased risk of infection, ranging from 9.1% to 63.0% (OR for the studies ranged from 1.85-5.04). Infection most commonly presented as bacteremia. Of the 6 studies comparing tocilizumab and corticosteroid use with placebo, 4 reported a nonsignificant increase toward corticosteroids being associated with bacterial infections (OR ranged from 2.76-3.8), and 2 studies reported no increased association with a higher infection risk. CONCLUSIONS: Our literature review showed mixed results with variable significance for the association of IL-6 inhibitors with risk of infections in patients with COVID-19.

11.
Chest ; 158(2): e55-e58, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-211230

ABSTRACT

We report the case of an 88-year-old man with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who presented with ARDS and septic shock. The patient had exquisite BP sensitivity to low-dose angiotensin II (Ang-2), allowing for rapid liberation from high-dose vasopressors. We hypothesize that sensitivity to Ang-2 might be related to biological effect of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. The case is suggestive of a potential role for synthetic Ang-2 for patients with COVID-19 and septic shock. Further studies are needed to confirm our observed clinical efficacy.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin II/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Shock, Septic/drug therapy , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin II/drug effects , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock, Septic/complications , Shock, Septic/metabolism
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL