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1.
ERJ Open Research ; : 00034-2022, 2022.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1817163

ABSTRACT

Sleep is a physiologically invigorating, mostly nocturnal state, that plays an important role in the empowerment of the immune system [1]. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is the most frequent form of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) [2], which may represent a relevant risk factor for the clinical course and prognosis of COVID-19 [3, 4]. Common characteristics and comorbidities of OSA and COVID-19 (male gender, age>60 years, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular- and, chronic pulmonary disease) were recently described as prognostic factors in COVID-19 [5]. However, the prevalence of SDB after COVID-19 remains insufficiently explored.

2.
Marchesi, Francesco, Salmanton-Garcia, Jon, Emarah, Ziad, Piukovics, Klára, Nucci, Marcio, Lopez-Garcia, Alberto, Racil, Zdenek, Farina, Francesca, Popova, Marina, Zompi, Sofia, Audisio, Ernesta, Ledoux, Marie-Pierre, Verga, Luisa, Weinbergerova, Barbora, Szotkowski, Tomas, Silva, Maria, Fracchiolla, Nicola Stefano, De Jonge, Nick, Collins, Graham, Marchetti, Monia, Magliano, Gabriele, GarcÍA-Vidal, Carolina, Biernat, Monika, Doesum, Jaap van, Machado, Marina, Demirkan, Fatih, Khabori, Murtadha Al, Zak, Pavel, Visek, Benjamin, Stoma, Igor, MÉNdez, Gustavo-Adolfo, Maertens, Johan, Khanna, Nina, Espigado, Ildefonso, Dragonetti, Giulia, Fianchi, Luana, Principe, Maria Ilaria Del, Cabirta, Alba, Ormazabal-VÉLez, Irati, Jaksic, Ozren, Buquicchio, Caterina, Bonuomo, Valentina, Batinić, Josip, Omrani, Ali, Lamure, Sylvain, Finizio, Olimpia, FernÁNdez, Noemí, Falces-Romero, Iker, Blennow, Ola, Bergantim, Rui, Ali, Natasha, Win, Sein, Praet, Jens V. A. N.; Tisi, Maria Chiara, Shirinova, Ayten, SchÖNlein, Martin, Prattes, Juergen, Piedimonte, Monica, Petzer, Verena, NavrÁTil, Milan, Kulasekararaj, Austin, Jindra, Pavel, Jiří, Glenthøj, Andreas, Fazzi, Rita, de Ramón, Cristina, Cattaneo, Chiara, Calbacho, Maria, Bahr, Nathan, El-Ashwl, Shaimaa Saber, Córdoba, Raúl, Hanakova, Michaela, Zambrotta, Giovanni, Sciumè, Mariarita, Booth, Stephen, Nunes-Rodrigues, Raquel, Sacchi, Maria Vittoria, GarcÍA-PoutÓN, Nicole, MartÍN-GonzÁLez, Juan-Alberto, Khostelidi, Sofya, GrÄFe, Stefanie, Rahimli, Laman, busca, alessandro, Corradini, Paolo, Hoenigl, Martin, Klimko, Nikolai, Koehler, Philipp, Pagliuca, Antonio, Passamonti, Francesco, Cornely, Oliver, pagano, Livio.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-328805

ABSTRACT

Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are at high risk of mortality from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The optimal management of AML patients with COVID-19 has not been established. Our multicenter study included 388 adult AML patients with COVID-19 diagnosis between February 2020 and October 2021. The vast majority were receiving or had received AML treatment in the prior 3 months. COVID-19 was severe in 41.2% and critical in 21.1% of cases. The chemotherapeutic schedule was modified in 174 patients (44.8%), delayed in 68 and permanently discontinued in 106. After a median follow-up of 325 days, 180 patients (46.4%) had died. Death was attributed to COVID-19 (43.3%), AML (26.1%) or to a combination of both (26.7%). Active disease, older age, and treatment discontinuation were associated with death, whereas AML treatment delay was protective. Seventy-nine patients had a simultaneous AML and COVID-19 diagnosis, with an improved survival when AML treatment could be delayed. Patients with COVID-19 diagnosis between January and August 2020 had a significantly lower survival. COVID-19 in AML patients was associated with a high mortality rate and modifications of therapeutic algorithms. The best approach to improve survival was to delay AML treatment.

3.
J Clin Microbiol ; 59(12): e0138121, 2021 11 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522904

ABSTRACT

Commercially available SARS-CoV-2-directed antibody assays may assist in diagnosing past exposure to SARS-CoV-2 antigens. We cross-compared the following eight immunoassays detecting antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid (N) or spike (S) antigens in three cohorts consisting of 859 samples from 622 patients: (#1) EDI novel coronavirus COVID-19 (Epitope), (#2) RecomWell SARS-CoV-2 (Mikrogen), (#3) COVID-19 ELISA (VirCell), (#4) Elecsys anti-SARS-CoV-2 N (Roche), (#5) Liaison SARS-CoV-2 S1/S2 (DiaSorin), (#6) anti-SARS-CoV-2 ELISA (EuroImmun), (#7) Elecsys anti-SARS-CoV-2 S (Roche), and (#8) Liaison SARS-CoV-2 TrimericS (DiaSorin). In cross-sectional cohort 1 (68 sera from 38 patients with documented SARS-CoV-2 infection), agreement between assays #1 to #6 ranged from 75% to 93%, whereby discordance mostly resulted from N-based assays #1 to #4. In cross-sectional cohort 2 (510 sera from 510 patients; 56 documented, 454 unknown SARS-CoV-2 infection), assays #4 to #6 were analyzed further together with assays #7 and #8, revealing 94% concordance (44 [9%] positives and 485 [85%] negatives). Discordance was highest within 2 weeks after SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 diagnosis and confirmed in the longitudinal cohort 3 (281 sera from 74 COVID-19 patients), using assays #4, #6, #7, and #8. Subanalysis of 20 (27%) initially seronegative cohort 3 patients revealed assay-dependent 50% and 90% seroconversion rates after 8 to 11 days and 14 to 18 days, respectively. Increasing SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were significantly associated with declining levels of viral loads, lactate dehydrogenase, interleukin-6, and C-reactive protein and preceded clearance of SARS-CoV-2 detection in the upper respiratory tract by approximately 1 week. SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody assays show substantial agreement, but interpretation of qualitative and semiquantitative results depends on the time elapsed postdiagnosis and the choice of viral antigen. Mounting of systemic SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies may predict recovery from viral injury and clearance of mucosal replication.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19 Testing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Immunoassay , Immunoglobulin G , Laboratories , Sensitivity and Specificity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
6.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 151: w20550, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1350364

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Patients with severe COVID-19 may be at risk of longer term sequelae. Long-term clinical, immunological, pulmonary and radiological outcomes of patients treated with anti-inflammatory drugs are lacking. METHODS: In this single-centre prospective cohort study, we assessed 90-day clinical, immunological, pulmonary and radiological outcomes of hospitalised patients with severe COVID-19 treated with tocilizumab from March 2020 to May 2020. Criteria for tocilizumab administration were oxygen saturation <93%, respiratory rate >30/min, C-reactive protein levels >75 mg/l, extensive area of ground-glass opacities or progression on computed tomography (CT). Descriptive analyses were performed using StataIC 16. RESULTS: Between March 2020 and May 2020, 50 (27%) of 186 hospitalised patients had severe COVID-19 and were treated with tocilizumab. Of these, 52% were hospitalised on the intensive care unit (ICU) and 12% died. Eleven (22%) patients developed at least one microbiologically confirmed super-infection, of which 91% occurred on ICU. Median duration of hospitalisation was 15 days (interquartile range [IQR] 10–24) with 24 days (IQR 14–32) in ICU patients and 10 days (IQR 7–15) in non-ICU patients. At day 90, 41 of 44 survivors (93%) were outpatients. No long-term adverse events or late-onset infections were identified after acute hospital care. High SARS-CoV-2 antibody titres were found in all but one patient, who was pretreated with rituximab. Pulmonary function tests showed no obstructive patterns, but restrictive patterns in two (5.7%) and impaired diffusion capacities for carbon monoxide in 11 (31%) of 35 patients, which predominated in prior ICU patients. Twenty-one of 35 (60%) CT-scans at day 90 showed residual abnormalities, with similar distributions between prior ICU and non-ICU patients. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of severe COVID-19 patients, no tocilizumab-related long-term adverse events or late-onset infections were identified. Although chest CT abnormalities were highly prevalent at day 90, the majority of patients showed normal lung function. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04351503.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cohort Studies , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Blood ; 136(Supplement 1):29-30, 2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1338955

ABSTRACT

Background. COVID-19, caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, is a pandemic disease with high morbidity and mortality. Currently, available therapeutic options for COVID-19 are limited. Prior experience in epidemics with convalescent plasma (CP) containing antibodies to viruses has demonstrated variable indications of therapeutic efficacy for: Influenza, Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever, and SARS. Characterizing antibody titers to viruses has indicated correlation with therapeutic efficacy. Convalescent COVID-19 patients with potent SARS-CoV-2 antibody responses can serve as plasma donors for immune therapy. However, antibody responses are variable, many donors are first-time higher risk blood donors, and rapid assays to select optimal CP immune efficacy are limited. Pathogen inactivation (PI) of CP can reduce the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection by unrecognized pathogens. Objectives. This study characterized COVID-19 PI-CP activity;and evaluated efficacy and safety of PI CP transfusion in a case matched controlled cohort of acute COVID-19 patients. Methods. COVID-19 apheresis CP (650 - 1300 mL) was collected from nasopharyngeal PCR + outpatients following 2 PCR negative tests or 28 days after symptom resolution. Amotosalen-UVA PI of CP (INTERCEPT Blood System for Plasma) was performed, and antibody efficacy before and after PI was characterized by: VSV reporter pseudo-virus plaque neutralization (RVPN) NT-50 titer (Vitalant Research Institute, San Francisco), antibody to S and N virus proteins by agglutination-dependent antibody PCR (ADAP, Enable Biosciences, San Francisco), virus ACE-2 soluble receptor neutralization assay (Enable Biosciences), and SARS-CoV-2 antibody profile by coronavirus microarray (University of California, Irvine). Patient inclusion criteria were: confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, hospitalization, pulmonary infiltrates, availability of ABO compatible CP, and informed consent. CP patients were matched with control patients (CTRL) for disease severity at diagnosis by standardized clinical risk score (W. Liang et al JAMA Intern Med 2020) and concomitant Tocilizumab use. CP Patients received a total of 400 mL of PI CP from 2 donors over 48 hours and standard therapy. CTRL patients received standard COVID-19 therapy without CP. The primary outcome was in-hospital death to day 28. Secondary outcomes included: progression to intubation, admission to ICU, time to discharge, serious adverse events, NP viral clearance, plasma viral clearance, and humoral immune responses. Differences between CP and CTRL patients were assessed by the Mann-Whitney test for continuous variables, and by Fisher's exact test for categorical variables. Progression to ICU and intubation were analyzed as odds ratios calculated by conditional logistic regression. Results. 15 CP and 30 CTRL patients were enrolled. One CP patient was admitted in cardiogenic shock. Only 2 of 15 CP cohort patients had detectable IgG antibody to SARS CoV-2 S1 antigen at study entry. 3 of 15 PI CP donors had negligible SARS CoV-2 IgG antibodies to all antigens, and demonstrated poor neutralization efficacy. 12/15 CP had effective RVPN titers (>1:80), RVPN titers were correlated with ACE-2 neutralization antibody titers (r2 = 0.83), and had significant activity specific for S and RBD antigens by microarray profiling (Figure 1). SARS CoV-2 antibody levels were variable between CP donors, but not impacted by PI (Figure 1). Baseline characteristics of CP and matched CTRL patients were similar (Table 1). Sensitivity analysis was performed assessing mortality after exclusion of one CTRL patient admitted in cardiogenic shock and the 2 respective controls. In-hospital 28-day mortality was lower in the CP cohort (0/14) compared to 5/28 CTRL, p = 0.151, 2-sided Fisher's exact test. Progression to intubation, ICU admission, and days in hospital were not significantly different (Table 1). There was a trend toward decreased inflammatory response (CRP normalization) in CP patients. Conclusions. In hospital mortality of COVID-19 patients was lower in the PI-CP cohor , but not statistically significant. 15% of CP had ineffective antibody by multiple assays. However, PI did not impact CP anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity. PI of plasma provides reduced risk of transfusion transmitted infection from COVID-19 CP donors. In this study, PI CP was safe, and may be effective for early treatment of hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

8.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 151: w20572, 2021 07 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1332303

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The aim of this study was to analyse the demographics, risk factors and in-hospital mortality rates of patients admitted with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) to a tertiary care hospital in Switzerland. METHODS: In this single-centre retrospective cohort study at the University Hospital Basel, we included all patients with confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection hospitalised from 27 February 2020 to 10 May 2021. Patients’ characteristics were extracted from the electronic medical record system. The primary outcome of this study was temporal trends of COVID-19-related in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were COVID-19-related mortality in patients hospitalised on the intensive care unit (ICU), admission to ICU, renal replacement therapy and length of hospital stay, as well as a descriptive analysis of risk factors for in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: During the study period we included 943 hospitalisations of 930 patients. The median age was 65 years (interquartile range [IQR] 53–76) and 63% were men. The numbers of elderly patients, patients with multiple comorbidities and need for renal replacement therapy decreased from the first and second to the third wave. The median length of stay and need for ICU admission were similar in all waves. Throughout the study period 88 patients (9.3%) died during the hospital stay. Crude in-hospital mortality was similar over the course of the first two waves (9.5% and 10.2%, respectively), whereas it decreased in the third wave (5.4%). Overall mortality in patients without comorbidities was low at 1.6%, but it increased in patients with any comorbidity to 12.6%. Predictors of all-cause mortality over the whole period were age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] per 10-year increase 1.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45–2.26; p <0.001), male sex (aOR 1.68, 95% CI 1.00–2.82; p = 0.048), immunocompromising condition (aOR 2.09, 95% CI 1.01–4.33; p = 0.048) and chronic kidney disease (aOR 2.25, 95% CI 1.35–3.76; p = 0.002). CONCLUSION: In our study in-hospital mortality was 9.5%, 10.2% and 5.4% in the first, second and third waves, respectively. Age, immunocompromising condition, male sex and chronic kidney disease were factors associated with in-hospital mortality. Importantly, patients without any comorbidity had a very low in-hospital mortality regardless of age.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Hospital Mortality/trends , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Kidney Diseases/epidemiology , Kidney Diseases/therapy , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Renal Replacement Therapy/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Switzerland/epidemiology
10.
J Med Virol ; 93(4): 2374-2384, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217387

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Detecting severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is key to the clinical and epidemiological assessment of CoVID-19. We cross-validated manual and automated high-throughput testing for SARS-CoV-2-RNA, evaluated SARS-CoV-2 loads in nasopharyngeal-oropharyngeal swabs (NOPS), lower respiratory fluids, and plasma, and analyzed detection rates after lockdown and relaxation measures. METHODS: Basel-S-gene, Roche-E-gene, and Roche-cobas®6800-Target1 and Target2 were prospectively validated in 1344 NOPS submitted during the first pandemic peak (Week 13). Follow-up cohort (FUP) 1, 2, and 3 comprised 10,999, 10,147, and 19,389 NOPS submitted during a 10-week period until Weeks 23, 33, and 43, respectively. RESULTS: Concordant results were obtained in 1308 cases (97%), including 97 (9%) SARS-CoV-2-positives showing high quantitative correlations (Spearman's r > .95; p < .001) for all assays and high precision by Bland-Altman analysis. Discordant samples (N = 36, 3%) had significantly lower SARS-CoV-2 loads (p < .001). Following lockdown, detection rates declined to <1% in FUP-1, reducing single-test positive predictive values from 99.3% to 85.1%. Following relaxation, rates flared up to 4% and 12% in FUP-2 and -3, but infected patients were younger than during lockdown (34 vs. 52 years, p < .001). In 261 patients providing 936 NOPS, SARS-CoV-2 loads declined by three orders of magnitude within 10 days postdiagnosis (p < .001). SARS-CoV-2 loads in NOPS correlated with those in time-matched lower respiratory fluids or in plasma but remained detectable in some cases with negative follow-up NOPS, respectively. CONCLUSION: Manual and automated assays significantly correlated qualitatively and quantitatively. Following a successful lockdown, declining positive predictive values require independent dual-target confirmation for reliable assessment. Confirmatory and quantitative follow-up testing should be obtained within <5 days and consider lower respiratory fluids in symptomatic patients with SARS-CoV-2-negative NOPS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Bronchoalveolar Lavage , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Testing , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Female , Genome, Viral , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Oropharynx/virology , Pandemics , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Switzerland/epidemiology , Viral Load
11.
JAMA ; 325(12): 1185-1195, 2021 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1178926

ABSTRACT

Importance: Convalescent plasma is a proposed treatment for COVID-19. Objective: To assess clinical outcomes with convalescent plasma treatment vs placebo or standard of care in peer-reviewed and preprint publications or press releases of randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Data Sources: PubMed, the Cochrane COVID-19 trial registry, and the Living Overview of Evidence platform were searched until January 29, 2021. Study Selection: The RCTs selected compared any type of convalescent plasma vs placebo or standard of care for patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 in any treatment setting. Data Extraction and Synthesis: Two reviewers independently extracted data on relevant clinical outcomes, trial characteristics, and patient characteristics and used the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment Tool. The primary analysis included peer-reviewed publications of RCTs only, whereas the secondary analysis included all publicly available RCT data (peer-reviewed publications, preprints, and press releases). Inverse variance-weighted meta-analyses were conducted to summarize the treatment effects. The certainty of the evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation. Main Outcomes and Measures: All-cause mortality, length of hospital stay, clinical improvement, clinical deterioration, mechanical ventilation use, and serious adverse events. Results: A total of 1060 patients from 4 peer-reviewed RCTs and 10 722 patients from 6 other publicly available RCTs were included. The summary risk ratio (RR) for all-cause mortality with convalescent plasma in the 4 peer-reviewed RCTs was 0.93 (95% CI, 0.63 to 1.38), the absolute risk difference was -1.21% (95% CI, -5.29% to 2.88%), and there was low certainty of the evidence due to imprecision. Across all 10 RCTs, the summary RR was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.92 to 1.12) and there was moderate certainty of the evidence due to inclusion of unpublished data. Among the peer-reviewed RCTs, the summary hazard ratio was 1.17 (95% CI, 0.07 to 20.34) for length of hospital stay, the summary RR was 0.76 (95% CI, 0.20 to 2.87) for mechanical ventilation use (the absolute risk difference for mechanical ventilation use was -2.56% [95% CI, -13.16% to 8.05%]), and there was low certainty of the evidence due to imprecision for both outcomes. Limited data on clinical improvement, clinical deterioration, and serious adverse events showed no significant differences. Conclusions and Relevance: Treatment with convalescent plasma compared with placebo or standard of care was not significantly associated with a decrease in all-cause mortality or with any benefit for other clinical outcomes. The certainty of the evidence was low to moderate for all-cause mortality and low for other outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Adult , Bias , COVID-19/mortality , Cause of Death , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive/adverse effects , Length of Stay , Male , Placebos/therapeutic use , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiration, Artificial , Standard of Care , Treatment Outcome
12.
JAMA ; 325(12): 1185-1195, 2021 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1103251

ABSTRACT

Importance: Convalescent plasma is a proposed treatment for COVID-19. Objective: To assess clinical outcomes with convalescent plasma treatment vs placebo or standard of care in peer-reviewed and preprint publications or press releases of randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Data Sources: PubMed, the Cochrane COVID-19 trial registry, and the Living Overview of Evidence platform were searched until January 29, 2021. Study Selection: The RCTs selected compared any type of convalescent plasma vs placebo or standard of care for patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 in any treatment setting. Data Extraction and Synthesis: Two reviewers independently extracted data on relevant clinical outcomes, trial characteristics, and patient characteristics and used the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment Tool. The primary analysis included peer-reviewed publications of RCTs only, whereas the secondary analysis included all publicly available RCT data (peer-reviewed publications, preprints, and press releases). Inverse variance-weighted meta-analyses were conducted to summarize the treatment effects. The certainty of the evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation. Main Outcomes and Measures: All-cause mortality, length of hospital stay, clinical improvement, clinical deterioration, mechanical ventilation use, and serious adverse events. Results: A total of 1060 patients from 4 peer-reviewed RCTs and 10 722 patients from 6 other publicly available RCTs were included. The summary risk ratio (RR) for all-cause mortality with convalescent plasma in the 4 peer-reviewed RCTs was 0.93 (95% CI, 0.63 to 1.38), the absolute risk difference was -1.21% (95% CI, -5.29% to 2.88%), and there was low certainty of the evidence due to imprecision. Across all 10 RCTs, the summary RR was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.92 to 1.12) and there was moderate certainty of the evidence due to inclusion of unpublished data. Among the peer-reviewed RCTs, the summary hazard ratio was 1.17 (95% CI, 0.07 to 20.34) for length of hospital stay, the summary RR was 0.76 (95% CI, 0.20 to 2.87) for mechanical ventilation use (the absolute risk difference for mechanical ventilation use was -2.56% [95% CI, -13.16% to 8.05%]), and there was low certainty of the evidence due to imprecision for both outcomes. Limited data on clinical improvement, clinical deterioration, and serious adverse events showed no significant differences. Conclusions and Relevance: Treatment with convalescent plasma compared with placebo or standard of care was not significantly associated with a decrease in all-cause mortality or with any benefit for other clinical outcomes. The certainty of the evidence was low to moderate for all-cause mortality and low for other outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Adult , Bias , COVID-19/mortality , Cause of Death , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive/adverse effects , Length of Stay , Male , Placebos/therapeutic use , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiration, Artificial , Standard of Care , Treatment Outcome
13.
J Intensive Care ; 9(1): 10, 2021 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067283

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: SARS-CoV-2 may cause acute lung injury, and secondary infections are thus relevant complications in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. However, detailed information on community- and hospital-acquired infections among patients with COVID-19 pneumonia is scarce. METHODS: We identified 220 SARS-CoV-2-positive patients hospitalized at the University Hospital Basel, Switzerland (between 25 February and 31 May 2020). We excluded patients who declined the general consent (n = 12), patients without clinical evidence of pneumonia (n = 29), and patients hospitalized for < 24 h (n = 17). We evaluated the frequency of community- and hospital-acquired infections using respiratory and blood culture materials with antigen, culture-based, and molecular diagnostics. For ICU patients, all clinical and microbial findings were re-evaluated interdisciplinary (intensive care, infectious disease, and clinical microbiology), and agreement reached to classify patients with infections. RESULTS: In the final cohort of 162 hospitalized patients (median age 64.4 years (IQR, 50.4-74.2); 61.1% male), 41 (25.3%) patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, 34/41 (82.9%) required mechanical ventilation, and 17 (10.5%) of all hospitalized patients died. In total, 31 infections were diagnosed including five viral co-infections, 24 bacterial infections, and three fungal infections (ventilator-associated pneumonia, n = 5; tracheobronchitis, n = 13; pneumonia, n = 1; and bloodstream infection, n = 6). Median time to respiratory tract infection was 12.5 days (IQR, 8-18) and time to bloodstream infection 14 days (IQR, 6-30). Hospital-acquired bacterial and fungal infections were more frequent among ICU patients than other patients (36.6% vs. 1.7%). Antibiotic or antifungal treatment was administered in 71 (43.8%) patients. CONCLUSIONS: Community-acquired viral and bacterial infections were rare among COVID-19 pneumonia patients. By contrast, hospital-acquired bacterial or fungal infections were frequently complicating the course among ICU patients.

14.
PLoS Biol ; 18(12): e3000963, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1040033

ABSTRACT

Approximately 28% of the human population have been exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), with the overwhelming majority of infected individuals not developing disease (latent TB infection (LTBI)). While it is known that uncontrolled HIV infection is a major risk factor for the development of TB, the effect of underlying LTBI on HIV disease progression is less well characterized, in part because longitudinal data are lacking. We sorted all participants of the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS) with at least 1 documented MTB test into one of the 3 groups: MTB uninfected, LTBI, or active TB. To detect differences in the HIV set point viral load (SPVL), linear regression was used; the frequency of the most common opportunistic infections (OIs) in the SHCS between MTB uninfected patients, patients with LTBI, and patients with active TB were compared using logistic regression and time-to-event analyses. In adjusted models, we corrected for baseline demographic characteristics, i.e., HIV transmission risk group and gender, geographic region, year of HIV diagnosis, and CD4 nadir. A total of 13,943 SHCS patients had at least 1 MTB test documented, of whom 840 (6.0%) had LTBI and 770 (5.5%) developed active TB. Compared to MTB uninfected patients, LTBI was associated with a 0.24 decreased log HIV SPVL in the adjusted model (p < 0.0001). Patients with LTBI had lower odds of having candida stomatitis (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, p = 0.0035) and oral hairy leukoplakia (adjusted OR = 0.67, p = 0.033) when compared to MTB uninfected patients. The association of LTBI with a reduced HIV set point virus load and fewer unrelated infections in HIV/TB coinfected patients suggests a more complex interaction between LTBI and HIV than previously assumed.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections/complications , Latent Tuberculosis/complications , Latent Tuberculosis/diagnosis , AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections/complications , AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections/etiology , AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections/microbiology , Adult , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes , Cohort Studies , Disease Progression , Female , HIV Infections/metabolism , HIV-1/pathogenicity , Humans , Interferon-gamma , Latent Tuberculosis/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/pathogenicity , Opportunistic Infections/complications , Risk , Tuberculosis/complications , Tuberculosis/diagnosis , Viral Load/immunology
15.
Int J Cardiol Heart Vasc ; 32: 100686, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-957119

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To investigate the effect of the corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the acute treatment of patients with ST-segment elevation (STEMI) and Non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). METHODS: We retrospectively identified patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with suspected ACS. We evaluated the number of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) for STEMI, NSTE-ACS, and elective PCI cases. In STEMI patients, we assessed the time from chest pain onset (cpo) to ED presentation, post-infarction left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and time from ED presentation to PCI. We directly compared cases from two time intervals: January/February 2020 versus March/April 2020 (defined as 2 months before and after the COVID-19 outbreak). In a secondary analysis, we directly compared cases from March/April 2020 with patients from the same time interval in 2019. RESULTS: From January to April 2020, 765 patients presented with acute chest pain to the ED. A dramatic reduction of ED presentations after compared to before the COVID-19 outbreak (31% relative reduction) was observed. Overall, 398 PCIs were performed, 220/398 PCIs (55.3%) before versus 178/398 PCIs (44.7%) after the outbreak. While numbers for NSTE-ACS and elective interventions declined by 21% and 31%, respectively, the number of STEMI cases remained stable. Time from cpo to ED presentation, post-infarction LVEF, and median door-to-balloon time remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to previous reports, our findings do not confirm the dramatic drop in STEMI cases and interventions in northwestern Switzerland as observed in other regions and hospitals around the world.

16.
J Infect Dis ; 222(8): 1270-1279, 2020 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-811304

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in China as the cause of coronavirus disease 2019 in December 2019 and reached Europe by late January 2020, when community-acquired respiratory viruses (CARVs) are at their annual peak. We validated the World Health Organization (WHO)-recommended SARS-CoV-2 assay and analyzed the epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 and CARVs. METHODS: Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs (NOPS) from 7663 patients were prospectively tested by the Basel S-gene and WHO-based E-gene (Roche) assays in parallel using the Basel N-gene assay for confirmation. CARVs were prospectively tested in 2394 NOPS by multiplex nucleic acid testing, including 1816 (75%) simultaneously for SARS-CoV-2. RESULTS: The Basel S-gene and Roche E-gene assays were concordant in 7475 cases (97.5%) including 825 (11%) SARS-CoV-2 positives. In 188 (2.5%) discordant cases, SARS-CoV-2 loads were significantly lower than in concordant positive ones and confirmed in 105 (1.4%). Adults were more frequently SARS-CoV-2 positive, whereas children tested more frequently CARV positive. CARV coinfections with SARS-CoV-2 occurred in 1.8%. SARS-CoV-2 replaced CARVs within 3 weeks, reaching 48% of all detected respiratory viruses followed by rhinovirus/enterovirus (13%), influenza virus (12%), coronavirus (9%), respiratory syncytial virus (6%), and metapneumovirus (6%). CONCLUSIONS: Winter CARVs were dominant during the early SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, impacting infection control and treatment decisions, but were rapidly replaced, suggesting competitive infection. We hypothesize that preexisting immune memory and innate immune interference contribute to the different SARS-CoV-2 epidemiology among adults and children.


Subject(s)
Coinfection/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Child, Preschool , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coinfection/immunology , Coinfection/virology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/virology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Pandemics , Phosphoproteins , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins , World Health Organization , Young Adult
17.
Antimicrob Agents Chemother ; 64(9)2020 08 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-639066

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) leads to inflammatory cytokine release, which can downregulate the expression of metabolizing enzymes. This cascade affects drug concentrations in the plasma. We investigated the association between lopinavir (LPV) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) plasma concentrations and the levels of the acute-phase inflammation marker C-reactive protein (CRP). LPV plasma concentrations in 92 patients hospitalized at our institution were prospectively collected. Lopinavir-ritonavir was administered every 12 hours, 800/200 mg on day 1 and 400/100 mg on day 2 until day 5 or 7. HCQ was given at 800 mg, followed by 400 mg after 6, 24, and 48 h. Hematological, liver, kidney, and inflammation laboratory values were analyzed on the day of drug level determination. The median age of study participants was 59 (range, 24 to 85) years, and 71% were male. The median durations from symptom onset to hospitalization and treatment initiation were 7 days (interquartile range [IQR], 4 to 10) and 8 days (IQR, 5 to 10), respectively. The median LPV trough concentration on day 3 of treatment was 26.5 µg/ml (IQR, 18.9 to 31.5). LPV plasma concentrations positively correlated with CRP values (r = 0.37, P < 0.001) and were significantly lower when tocilizumab was preadministered. No correlation was found between HCQ concentrations and CRP values. High LPV plasma concentrations were observed in COVID-19 patients. The ratio of calculated unbound drug fraction to published SARS-CoV-2 50% effective concentrations (EC50) indicated insufficient LPV concentrations in the lung. CRP values significantly correlated with LPV but not HCQ plasma concentrations, implying inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) metabolism by inflammation.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacokinetics , Lopinavir/pharmacokinetics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Ritonavir/pharmacokinetics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/blood , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Drug Administration Schedule , Drug Combinations , Female , Hospitals, University , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/blood , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Lopinavir/blood , Lopinavir/pharmacology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , Ritonavir/blood , Ritonavir/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis
18.
Am J Transplant ; 20(10): 2876-2882, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-263492

ABSTRACT

Immunocompromised patients may be at increased risk for complications of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. However, comprehensive data of SARS-CoV-2 infection in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are still lacking. We performed a multicenter nationwide observational study within the Swiss Transplant Cohort Study (STCS) to describe the epidemiology, clinical presentation, treatment and outcomes of the first microbiologically documented SARS-CoV-2 infection among SOT recipients. Overall, 21 patients were included with a median age of 56 years (10 kidney, 5 liver, 1 pancreas, 1 lung, 1 heart and 3 combined transplantations). The most common presenting symptoms were fever (76%), dry cough (57%), nausea (33%), and diarrhea (33%). Ninety-five percent and 24% of patients required hospital and ICU admission, respectively, and 19% were intubated. After a median of 33 days of follow-up, 16 patients were discharged, 3 were still hospitalized and 2 patients died. These data suggest that clinical manifestations of SARS-CoV-2 infection in middle-aged SOT recipients appear to be similar to the general population without an apparent higher rate of complications. These results need to be confirmed in larger cohorts.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Organ Transplantation/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Transplant Recipients , Aged , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate/trends , Switzerland/epidemiology
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