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1.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1375, 2022 07 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1938306

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Huge efforts are being made to control the spread and impacts of the coronavirus pandemic using vaccines. However, willingness to be vaccinated depends on factors beyond the availability of vaccines. The aim of this study was three-folded: to assess children's rates of COVID-19 Vaccination as reported by parents, to explore parents' attitudes towards children's COVID-19 vaccination, and to examine the factors associated with parents' hesitancy towards children's vaccination in several countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR). METHODS: This study utilized a cross-sectional descriptive design. A sample of 3744 parents from eight countries, namely, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia (KSA), and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), was conveniently approached and surveyed using Google forms from November to December 2021. The participants have responded to a 42-item questionnaire pertaining to socio-demographics, children vaccination status, knowledge about COVID-19 vaccines, and attitudes towards vaccinating children and the vaccine itself. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS- IBM, Chicago, IL, USA) was used to analyze the data. A cross-tabulation analysis using the chi-square test was employed to assess significant differences between categorical variables and a backward Wald stepwise binary logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the independent effect of each factor after controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS: The prevalence of vaccinated children against COVID-19 was 32% as reported by the parents. Concerning parents' attitudes towards vaccines safety, about one third of participants (32.5%) believe that all vaccines are not safe. In the regression analysis, children's vaccination was significantly correlated with parents' age, education, occupation, parents' previous COVID-19 infection, and their vaccination status. Participants aged ≥50 years and those aged 40-50 years had an odds ratio of 17.9 (OR = 17.9, CI: 11.16-28.97) and 13.2 (OR = 13.2, CI: 8.42-20.88); respectively, for vaccinating their children compared to those aged 18-29 years. Parents who had COVID-19 vaccine were about five folds more likely to vaccinate their children compared with parents who did not receive the vaccine (OR = 4.9, CI: 3.12-7.70). The prevalence of children's vaccination in the participating Arab countries is still not promising. CONCLUSION: To encourage parents, vaccinate their children against COVID-19, Arab governments should strategize accordingly. Reassurance of the efficacy and effectiveness of the vaccine should target the general population using educational campaigns, social media, and official TV and radio channels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Parents , Vaccination , Vaccination Hesitancy
2.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 621, 2022 May 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833310

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The balanced scorecard (BSC) has been implemented to evaluate the performance of health care organizations (HCOs). BSC proved to be effective in improving financial performance and patient satisfaction. AIM: This systematic review aims to identify all the perspectives, dimensions, and KPIs that are vital and most frequently used by health care managers in BSC implementations. METHODS: This systematic review adheres to PRISMA guidelines. The PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, and Google Scholar databases and Google search engine were inspected to find all implementations of BSC at HCO. The risk of bias was assessed using the nonrandomized intervention studies (ROBINS-I) tool to evaluate the quality of observational and quasi-experimental studies and the Cochrane (RoB 2) tool for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). RESULTS: There were 33 eligible studies, of which we identified 36 BSC implementations. The categorization and regrouping of the 797 KPIs resulted in 45 subdimensions. The reassembly of these subdimensions resulted in 13 major dimensions: financial, efficiency and effectiveness, availability and quality of supplies and services, managerial tasks, health care workers' (HCWs) scientific development error-free and safety, time, HCW-centeredness, patient-centeredness, technology, and information systems, community care and reputation, HCO building, and communication. On the other hand, this review detected that BSC design modification to include external and managerial perspectives was necessary for many BSC implementations. CONCLUSION: This review solves the KPI categorization dilemma. It also guides researchers and health care managers in choosing dimensions for future BSC implementations and performance evaluations in general. Consequently, dimension uniformity will improve the data sharing and comparability among studies. Additionally, despite the pandemic negatively influencing many dimensions, the researchers observed a lack of comprehensive HCO performance evaluations. In the same vein, although some resulting dimensions were assessed separately during the pandemic, other dimensions still lack investigation. Last, BSC dimensions may play an essential role in tackling the COVID-19 pandemic. However, further research is required to investigate the BSC implementation effect in mitigating the pandemic consequences on HCO.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Facilities , Health Personnel , Humans , Patient Satisfaction
3.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-330722

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of internet gaming disorders (IGD) is considerably high among youth, especially with social isolation imposed by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. IGD adversely affects mental health, quality of life, and academic performance. The Internet Gaming Disorder Scale (IGDS9-SF) is designed to detect IGD according to DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. However, inconsistent results are reported on its capacity to diagnose IGD evenly across different cultures. To ensure the suitability of the IGDS9-SF as a global measure of IGD, this study examined the psychometric properties of the IGDS9-SF in a sample of Sri Lankan university students (N = 322, mean age =17.2 ±0.6, range = 16-18 years, 56.5% males) and evaluated its measurement invariance across samples from Sri Lanka, Turkey, Australia, and the USA. Among Sri Lankan students, a unidimensional structure expressed good fit, invariance across different groups (e.g., gender, ethnicity, and income), adequate criterion validity (strong correlation with motives of internet gaming, daily gaming duration, and sleep quality), and good reliability (alpha = 0.81). Males and online multiplayers expressed higher IGD levels, greater time spent gaming, and more endorsement of gaming motives (e.g., Social and Coping) than females and offline players. Across countries, the IGDS9-SF was invariant at the configural, metric, and scalar levels, albeit strict invariance was not maintained. The lowest and highest IGD levels were reported among Turkish and American respondents, respectively. In conclusion, the IGDS9-SF can be reliably used to measure IGD among Sri Lankan youth. Because the scale holds scalar invariance across countries, its scores can be used to compare IGD levels in the studied countries.

4.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(3)2022 Mar 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731998

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of internet gaming disorders (IGD) is considerably high among youth, especially with the social isolation imposed by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. IGD adversely affects mental health, quality of life, and academic performance. The Internet Gaming Disorder Scale (IGDS9-SF) is designed to detect IGD according to DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. However, inconsistent results are reported on its capacity to diagnose IGD evenly across different cultures. To ensure the suitability of the IGDS9-SF as a global measure of IGD, this study examined the psychometric properties of the IGDS9-SF in a sample of Sri Lankan university students (N = 322, mean age = 17.2 ± 0.6, range = 16-18 years, 56.5% males) and evaluated its measurement invariance across samples from Sri Lanka, Turkey, Australia, and the USA. Among Sri Lankan students, a unidimensional structure expressed good fit, invariance across different groups (e.g., gender, ethnicity, and income), adequate criterion validity (strong correlation with motives of internet gaming, daily gaming duration, and sleep quality), and good reliability (alpha = 0.81). Males and online multiplayers expressed higher IGD levels, greater time spent gaming, and more endorsement of gaming motives (e.g., Social and Coping) than females and offline players. Across countries, the IGDS9-SF was invariant at the configural, metric, and scalar levels, although strict invariance was not maintained. The lowest and highest IGD levels were reported among Turkish and American respondents, respectively. In conclusion, the IGDS9-SF can be reliably used to measure IGD among Sri Lankan youth. Because the scale holds scalar invariance across countries, its scores can be used to compare IGD levels in the studied countries.

5.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-328675

ABSTRACT

Background: Huge efforts are being made to control the spread and impacts of the coronavirus pandemic using vaccines. However, willingness to be vaccinated depends on factors beyond the availability of vaccines. The aim of this study was three-folded: to assess the prevalence of children’s vaccination against COVID-19, to explore parents’ attitudes towards children’s vaccination, and to discover the factors associated with parents’ hesitancy towards children’s vaccination in several countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR). Methods: : This study utilized a cross-sectional descriptive design. A sample of 3744 parents from eight countries, namely, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia (KSA), and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), was conveniently approached and surveyed using Google forms. The participants have responded to a 42-item questionnaire pertaining to socio-demographics, children vaccination status, knowledge about COVID-19 vaccines, and attitudes towards vaccinating children and the vaccine itself. Results: : The prevalence of vaccinated children against COVID-19 was 32% as indicated by the parents. Concerning parents’ attitudes towards vaccines safety, about one third of participants (32.5%) believe that all vaccines are not safe. In the regression analysis, children’s vaccination was significantly correlated with parents’ age, education, occupation, parents’ previous COVID-19 infection, and their vaccination status. Participants aged ≥50 years and those aged 40-50 years had an odds ratio of 17.9 (OR=17.9, CI: 11.16-28.97) and 13.2 (OR=13.2, CI: 8.42-20.88);respectively, for vaccinating their children compared to those aged 18-29 years. Parents who had COVID-19 vaccine were about five folds more likely to vaccinate their children compared with parents who did not receive the vaccine (OR=4.9, CI: 3.12-7.70). The prevalence of children’s vaccination in the participating Arab countries is still not promising. Conclusion: To encourage parents, vaccinate their children against COVID-19, Arab governments should strategize accordingly. Reassurance of the efficacy and effectiveness of the vaccine should target the general population using educational campaigns, social media, and official TV and radio channels.

6.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-328504

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of internet gaming disorders (IGD) is considerably high among youth, especially with social isolation imposed by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. IGD adversely affects mental health, quality of life, and academic performance. The Internet Gaming Disorder Scale (IGDS9-SF) is designed to detect IGD according to DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. However, inconsistent results are reported on its capacity to diagnose IGD evenly across different cultures. To ensure the suitability of the IGDS9-SF as a global measure of IGD, this study examined the psychometric properties of the IGDS9-SF in a sample of Sri Lankan university students (N = 322, mean age =17.2 ±0.6, range = 16-18 years, 56.5% males) and evaluated its measurement invariance across samples from Sri Lanka, Turkey, Australia, and the USA. Among Sri Lankan students, a unidimensional structure expressed good fit, invariance across different groups (gender, ethnicity, income, etc.), adequate criterion validity (strong correlation with motives of internet gaming, daily gaming duration, and sleep quality), and good reliability (alpha = 0.81). Males and online multiplayers expressed higher IGD levels, greater time spent gaming, and more endorsement of gaming motives (e.g., Social and Coping) than females and offline players. Across countries, the IGDS9-SF was invariant at the configural, metric, and scalar levels, albeit strict invariance was not maintained. The lowest and highest IGD levels were reported among Turkish and American respondents, respectively. In conclusion, the IGDS9-SF can be reliably used to measure IGD among Sri Lankan youth. Because the scale holds scalar invariance across countries, its scores can be used to compare IGD levels in the studied countries.

7.
Nurs Open ; 9(1): 676-683, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594804

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Different types of hospitals exist in Jordan, and each type has its own leadership style. This might affect the nursing workforce in terms of quality of life and intent to leave. AIM: This study aimed at (1) assessing the relationship between paediatric nurses' quality of life and intent to leave, (2) examining the moderating effect of the hospital type on this relationship, (3) comparing the quality of life of paediatric nurses working at ministry of health and the University-Affiliated hospitals and (4) exploring the determinants of nurses' intent to leave. DESIGN: A cross-sectional, comparative and correlational design was used in this study. METHODS: A multi-site sample was selected from two types of hospitals in Jordan; the ministry of health and the University-Affiliated hospitals. A sample of 225 paediatric nurses responded to the brief quality of life questionnaire by the World Health Organization in addition to a group of sociodemographic and work-related questions. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Nurses' quality of life and intent to leave were negatively correlated. This correlation was moderated by the type of hospital. Nurses' quality of life was significantly different in the two types of hospitals. Both salary and nursing care model predicted paediatric nurses' intent to leave. The managerial style and work environment of the ministry of health hospitals should be benchmarked against the University-Affiliated hospitals.


Subject(s)
Nurses, Pediatric , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Quality of Life
8.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-294086

ABSTRACT

Aims This systematic review aims to assess the impact of Balanced Scorecard (BSC) implementation at Health Care Organizations (HCOs) on Health Care Workers’ (HCWs’) satisfaction, patient satisfaction, and financial performance. Up to now, no previous systematic reviews have performed a comprehensive and rigorous methodological approach to figure out the impact of BSC implementation in HCOs. Methods This systematic review was prepared according to PRISMA guidelines. PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, and Google Scholar databases, as well as Google search engine, were inspected to find all BSC implementations at HCOs until 20 September 2020. Then the resulted articles were screened to find the implementations which measured the impact of BSC on HCWs’ satisfaction, patient satisfaction, and financial performance. Quality assessment was performed using the Standards for Reporting Implementation Studies: (StaRI) checklist. Results Out of 4031 records, 20 articles were finally included for measuring one or more of the three impact types. 17 measured the impact of BSC on patient satisfaction, 7 on HCWs’ satisfaction, and 12 on financial performance. Studies with higher quality had a higher positive impact. Conclusion This paper offers evidence to HCOs and policymakers on the benefits of implementing BSC. BSC implementations showed a positive impact on patient satisfaction and financial performance in HCOs. However, less impact was found on HCWs’ satisfaction, which should be given better consideration in future BSC implementations. High and medium-quality BSC studies were associated with higher positive impacts than low ones. BSC can be utilized as an effective tool to improve HCOs’ performance during the COVID-19 pandemic.

9.
Front Public Health ; 9: 745149, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533722

ABSTRACT

Aims: This study aimed to (1) assess the non-pharmaceutical intervention (NPI) measures that were used by the Jordanian population against COVID-19, and (2) determine the sociodemographic and behavioral predictors of contracting COVID-19 with a focus on the utilization of personal precautionary measures. Methods: A descriptive questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey was used in this study. A structured web-based questionnaire was disseminated to the Jordanian community through social media platforms. Participants were asked a series of questions about socio-demographic characteristics, in addition to the knowledge, attitudes, and commitment toward using various personal precautionary measures (e.g., face mask, hand washing, social distancing) against the COVID-19. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, cross-tabulation, and binary logistic regression through SPSS®. Results: Responses from 7,746 participants were included in our final analyses. Descriptive statistics showed that most participants (82.6%) believed that face mask protects against COVID-19. Around 69.5% of the participants were completely committed to wearing a face mask, while 65% of the participants were completely committed to hand washing. The results of the regression analysis revealed that female gender (AOR = 1.2; 95% CI: 1.07-1.35; p = 0.002), having a family member infected with COVID-19 (AOR = 8.5; 95% Cl: 7.51-9.70; p = 0.001), having a health-related work or study (AOR = 1.2; 95% Cl: 1.09-1.38; p = 0.001), believing that face masks do not protect against COVID-19 (AOR = 1.3; 95% Cl: 1.12-1.47; p = 0.001), and partial commitment to handwashing (AOR = 1.2; 95% Cl: 1.11-1.75; p = 0.006) were all associated with an increased odds of contracting COVID-19 among the participants. Conclusion: Overall, commitment to non-pharmaceutical intervention (NPI) measures, such as wearing a face mask, hand washing, and physical distancing, was not optimal among Jordanians. This might explain the dramatic increase in the infectivity rate of the COVID-19 virus in the past few months in the country. More sustainable efforts regarding health promotion and strict policies are required to prevent a third wave of hitting the country and to prevent similar infectious threats in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Attitude , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Masks , SARS-CoV-2
10.
J Clin Nurs ; 2021 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488224

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: A model was hypothesised by integrating two theoretical models: the compassion satisfaction-compassion fatigue and empowerment models. This study aimed to assess the extent to which this integrated model can explain the relationships between paediatric nurses' burnout quality of life, perceived patient safety and work-related variables during the COVID-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: Nurses' burnout is negatively associated with quality of life (QOL) and positively with patient safety. Several theoretical models were introduced to explain burnout determinants and outcomes such as Golembiewski, Munzenrider and Stevenson model, Leiter and Maslach's process model, and Lee and Ashforth's model. However, few models described burnout in relation to QOL or patient safety. METHODS: A sample of 225 paediatric nurses responded to questionnaires about burnout, QOL, adverse events and work-related variables. Compassion satisfaction - compassion fatigue and empowerment models were integrated into a single model and tested using structural equation modelling analysis. This study was prepared and is reported according to the STROBE checklist. RESULTS: The final model explained 65% of the variance of burnout and 37% of the variance of QOL. The work-related variables (co-workers' support, job satisfaction, satisfaction with the monthly salary, participation in continuous education and exposure to violence) are predicting paediatric nurses' burnout and quality of life. CONCLUSION: The Compassion satisfaction - compassion fatigue -Empowerment integrated model allows for assessing the different paths in the relationship between work-related variables and burnout. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: These results might be essential for nursing managers to develop strategies that improve nurses' work environment and minimise their burnout during COVID-19 pandemic. These strategies should focus on enhancing co-workers' support, job satisfaction and participation in continuous education. Furthermore, paediatric nurses should be protected from any violence.

11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(17)2021 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374397

ABSTRACT

Various changes have affected health services delivery in response to the repercussions of the COVID-19 pandemic, and this may exhibit unprecedented effects on healthcare workers (HCWs). This study aimed to explore the lived experience of physicians and nurses caring for patients with COVID-19 in Jordan. An interpretative phenomenology approach was used, and sampling was purposively performed. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews using an online meeting platform (Zoom®). Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed. The data were obtained from 26 physicians and nurses caring for patients with COVID-19. The mean age of the participants was 29.41 years (SD = 2.72). Six main themes and 17 subthemes were identified: (i) emotional reactions; (ii) preparation; (iii) source of support; (iv) extreme workload; (v) occupational challenges, and (vi) work-related concerns. The results showed that nurses and physicians caring for COVID-19 patients in Jordan were experiencing mental and emotional distress and were practicing under inadequate work conditions. This distress could be multifactorial with personal, organizational, or cultural origins. Our findings may guide policymakers to consider the potential factors that significantly affect working environment in healthcare settings, the physical and mental wellbeing of HCWs, and the required professional training that can help in enhancing resilience and coping strategies amidst crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Physicians , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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