Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
Psychiatry Res ; 305: 114243, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466842

ABSTRACT

The long-term impact of the COVID-19 infection on mental health in people and its relation to the severity is unclear. We aimed to study the long-term effect of post-COVID-19 disease on sleep and mental health and to detect possible relationship between severity of COVID-19 at onset and sleep and mental illness. We enrolled 182 participants 6 months post COVID-19 infection and grouped into non-severe(101),severe(60) and critical(20) according to according to WHO guidance. All participants were assessed using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index ", Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Checklist for DSM-5, and Symptom Checklist90 test. Only 8.8% had no psychiatric symptoms while 91.2% had psychiatric symptoms as follow (poor sleep (64.8%), PTSD (28.6%), somatization (41.8%), obsessive-compulsive (OCD) (19.8%), depression (11.5%), anxiety (28%), phobic-anxiety (24.2%), psychoticism (17.6%)). Diabetes, oxygen support or mechanically ventilated were a risk for sleep impairment, while high Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio(NLR) was the only risk factor for PTSD. Other psychiatric illnesses had several risk factors: being female, diabetes, oxygen support or mechanically ventilated. Abnormal sleep, somatization and anxiety are the most common mental illnesses in Post-Covid19. The critical group is common associated with PTSD, anxiety, and psychosis. Being female, diabetic, having oxygen support or mechanically ventilated, and high NLR level are more vulnerable for mental illness in post COVID19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Female , Humans , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
2.
J Infect Public Health ; 14(10): 1474-1480, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415574

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at a high risk for disease exposure. Given the limited availability of nucleic acid testing by PCR in low resource settings, serological assays can provide useful data on the proportion of HCWs who have recently or previously been infected. Therefore, in this study, we conducted an immunologic study to determine the seroprevalence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in two university hospitals in Egypt. METHODS: in this cross sectional study, HCWs who were working in SARS-CoV-2 Isolation Hospitals were interviewed. Estimating specific antibodies (IgM and IgG) against SARS-CoV-2 was carried out using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay targeting the Spike antigen of SARS-CoV-2 virus. RESULTS: Out of 111, 82 (74%) HCWs accepted to participate with a mean age of 31.5 ± 8.5 years. Anti-SARS-COV2 antibodies were detected in 38/82 (46.3%) of cases with a mean age of 31 years and female HCWs constituted 57.6% of cases. The highest rate of seropositivity was from the nurses (60.5%), and physicians (31.6%) with only (7.9%) technicians. Only 28/82 (34.1%) HCWs reported previous history of COVID19. We reported a statistically significant difference in the timing of exposure (p = 0.010) and the frequency of contact with COVID-19 cases (p = 0.040) between previously infected and on-infected HCWs. Longer time of recovery was reported from IgG positive HCWs (p = 0.036). CONCLUSION: The high frequency of seropositive HCWs in investigated hospitals is alarming, especially among asymptomatic personnel. Confirmation of diseased HCWs (among seropositive ones) are warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Antibodies, Viral , Cross-Sectional Studies , Egypt/epidemiology , Female , Health Personnel , Hospitals, University , Humans , Prevalence , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Young Adult
3.
Front Neurol ; 12: 678136, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305660

ABSTRACT

Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a potentially fatal, immune-mediated disease of the peripheral nervous system that is usually triggered by infection. Only a small number of cases of GBS associated with COVID-19 infection have been published. We report here five patients with GBS admitted to the Neurology, Psychiatry, and Neurosurgery Hospital, Assiut University/Egypt from July 1 to November 20, 2020. Three of the five patients were positive for SARS-CoV-2 following polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of nasopharyngeal swabs on day of admission and another one had a high level of IgM and IgG; all had bilateral ground-glass opacities with consolidation on CT chest scan (GGO) and lymphopenia. All patients presented with two or more of the following: fever, cough, malaise, vomiting, and diarrhea with variable duration. However, there were some peculiarities in the clinical presentation. First, there were only 3 to 14 days between the onset of COVID-19 symptoms and the first symptoms of GBS, which developed into flaccid areflexic quadriplegia with glove and stocking hypoesthesia. The second peculiarity was that three of the cases had cranial nerve involvement, suggesting that there may be a high incidence of cranial involvement in SARS-CoV-2-associated GBS. Other peculiarities occurred. Case 2 presented with a cerebellar hemorrhage before symptoms of COVID-19 and had a cardiac attack with elevated cardiac enzymes following onset of GBS symptoms. Case 5 was also unusual in that the onset began with bilateral facial palsy, which preceded the sensory and motor manifestations of GBS (descending course). Neurophysiological studies showed evidence of sensorimotor demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, suggesting acute inflammatory polyneuropathy (AIDP) in all patients. Three patients received plasmapheresis. All of them had either full recovery or partial recovery. Possible pathophysiological links between GBS and COVID-19 are discussed.

5.
Epilepsy Res ; 174: 106650, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213222

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Post COVID-19 seizures are relatively rare. The aim of the present study was to estimate the frequency of acute symptomatic seizures among patients with COVID-19 and to discuss possible pathophysiological mechanisms. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Out of 439 cases with COVID-19 that were admitted to Assiut and Aswan University hospitals during the period from 1 June to 10 August 2020, 19 patients (4.3 %) presented with acute symptomatic seizures. Each patient underwent computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and conventional electroencephalography (EEG). Laboratory investigations included: blood gases, complete blood picture, serum D-Dimer, Ferritin, C-reactive protein, renal and liver functions, and coagulation profile. RESULTS: Of the 19 patients, 3 had new onset seizures without underlying pathology (0.68 % out of the total 439 patients); 2 others (0.46 %) had previously diagnosed controlled epilepsy with breakthrough seizures. The majority of cases (14 patients, 3.19 %) had primary pathology that could explain the occurrence of seizures: 5 suffered a post COVID-19 stroke (3 ischemic and 2 hemorrhagic stroke); 6 patients had COVID-related encephalitis; 2 patients were old ischemic stroke patients; 1 patient had a brain tumor and developed seizures post COVID-19. CONCLUSION: acute symptomatic seizure is not a rare complication of post COVID-19 infection. Both new onset seizures and seizures secondary to primary brain insult (post COVID encephalitis or recent stroke) were observed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Encephalitis, Viral/epidemiology , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Seizures/epidemiology , Stroke/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/physiopathology , Egypt/epidemiology , Electroencephalography , Epilepsy/drug therapy , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/physiopathology , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
6.
Front Neurol ; 12: 635856, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172971

ABSTRACT

Background and Purpose: There is little information on the acute cerebrovascular complications of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Egypt. The aim of this study was to estimate the proportion of acute cerebrovascular disease (CVD) among COVID-19 patients and evaluate their clinical and radiological characteristics in comparison with non-COVID-19 CVD. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study, COVID-19 patients whom presented with CVD in Assiut and Aswan University Hospitals were compared with non-COVID-19, CVD patients, admitted to Qena University Hospital, prior to the pandemic. The following data were collected: clinical history and presentation, risk factors, comorbidities, brain imaging (MRI or CT), chest CT, and some laboratory investigations. Results: Fifty-five (12.5%) of the 439 patients with COVID-19 had acute CVD. Of them, 42 (9.6%) had ischemic stroke while 13 patients (2.9%) had hemorrhagic CVD. In the 250 cases of the non-COVID-19 group, 180 had ischemic stroke and 70 had hemorrhagic stroke. A large proportion of patients with COVID-19 who presented with ischemic stroke had large vessel occlusion (LVO), which was significantly higher than in non-COVID-19 patients with CVD (40 vs. 7.2%, P < 0.001). Comorbidities were recorded in 44 (80%) cases. In COVID-19 ischemic stroke patients, risk factors [hypertension and ischemic heart disease (IHD)] and comorbidities (hepatic and renal) were significantly higher than those in non-COVID-19 patients. In addition, 23.5% had hemorrhagic CVD, and six patients with LVO developed hemorrhagic transformation. Conclusion: Acute CVD among patients with COVID-19 was common in our study. LVO was the commonest. Hypertension, IHD, and anemia are the most common risk factors and could contribute to the worsening of clinical presentation. Comorbidities were common among patients with CVD, although a large number had elevated liver enzymes and creatinine that were partially due to COVID-19 infection itself. The current results begin to characterize the spectrum of CVD associated with COVID-19 in patients in Upper Egypt. Registration ID: The ID number of this study is IRB no: 17300470.

7.
Neuroepidemiology ; 55(2): 109-118, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102234

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 can be accompanied by acute neurological complications of both central and peripheral nervous systems (CNS and PNS). In this study, we estimate the frequency of such complications among hospital inpatients with COVID-19 in Assiut and Aswan university hospitals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We screened all patients with suspected COVID-19 admitted from 1 June to 10 August 2020 to the university hospitals of Assiut and Aswan in Upper Egypt. Clinical and laboratory tests, CT/MRI of the chest and brain, and neurophysiology study were performed for each patient if indicated. RESULTS: 439 patients had confirmed/probable COVID-19; neurological manifestations occurred in 222. Of these, 117 had acute neurological disease and the remainder had nonspecific neuropsychiatric symptoms such as headache, vertigo, and depression. The CNS was affected in 75 patients: 55 had stroke and the others had convulsions (5), encephalitis (6), hypoxic encephalopathy (4), cord myelopathy (2), relapse of multiple sclerosis (2), and meningoencephalitis (1). The PNS was affected in 42 patients: the majority had anosmia and ageusia (31) and the others had Guillain-Barré syndrome (4), peripheral neuropathy (3), myasthenia gravis (MG, 2), or myositis (2). Fever, respiratory symptoms, and headache were the most common general symptoms. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease were the most common comorbidities in patients with CNS affection. CONCLUSION: In COVID-19, both the CNS and PNS are affected. Stroke was the most common complication for CNS, and anosmia and/or ageusia were common for PNS diseases. However, there were 6 cases of encephalitis, 2 cases of spinal cord myelopathy, 2 cases of MG, and 2 cases of myositis.


Subject(s)
Anosmia/physiopathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Central Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , Stroke/physiopathology , Adult , Aged , Anosmia/epidemiology , Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Central Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Central Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Disease Progression , Egypt/epidemiology , Encephalitis/epidemiology , Encephalitis/physiopathology , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/epidemiology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/physiopathology , Hospitals, University , Humans , Hypoxia, Brain/epidemiology , Hypoxia, Brain/physiopathology , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting/physiopathology , Myasthenia Gravis/epidemiology , Myasthenia Gravis/physiopathology , Myositis/epidemiology , Myositis/physiopathology , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/epidemiology , Seizures/physiopathology , Spinal Cord/diagnostic imaging , Spinal Cord Diseases/epidemiology , Spinal Cord Diseases/physiopathology , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
8.
Front Neurol ; 11: 610648, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1016073

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is typically associated with fever and severe respiratory symptoms including dry cough and dyspnea. However, COVID-19 may also affect both central and peripheral nervous systems. To date, the incidence rate of spinal cord involvement in COVID-19 is not known and the pathogenesis is still not fully understood. We report here two female patients admitted to Assiut University Hospitals/Egypt during the period from first of July to August 10, 2020. Both presented with a positive SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) nasopharyngeal swab, elevated serum d-dimer and ferritin levels, and bilateral ground glass appearance in a CT chest scan. The first was a 60-year-old female with acute onset of flaccid paraplegia 10 days after flu-like symptoms, in whom MRI revealed transverse myelitis. The second was a 21-year-old female with symptoms of acute quadriplegia, fever, headache, and anosmia in whom an MRI scan revealed long cervico-thoracic myelopathy. Anterior spinal artery occlusion and possibly transverse myelitis were considered as differential diagnosis of long segment myelopathy.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL