Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Journal fur Anasthesie und Intensivbehandlung ; - (3-4):67-77, 2021.
Article in German | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2011741
2.
consortium, Capacity-Covid collaborative, Group, Leoss Study, Linschoten, M.; Uijl, A.; Schut, A.; Jakob, C. E. M.; Romão, L. R.; Bell, R. M.; McFarlane, E.; Stecher, M.; Zondag, A. G. M.; van Iperen, E. P. A.; Hermans-van Ast, W.; Lea, N. C.; Schaap, J.; Jewbali, L. S.; Smits, P. C.; Patel, R. S.; Aujayeb, A.; Ripley, D. P.; Saxena, M.; Spinner, C.; McCann, G. P.; Moss, A. J.; Parker, E.; Borgmann, S.; Tessitore, E.; Rieg, S.; Kearney, M. T.; Byrom-Goulthorp, R.; Hower, M.; Al-Ali, A. K.; Alshehri, A. M.; Alnafie, A. N.; Alshahrani, M.; Almubarak, Y. A.; Al-Muhanna, F. A.; Al-Rubaish, A. M.; Hanses, F.; Shore, A. C.; Ball, C.; Anning, C. M.; Rüthrich, M. M.; Nierop, P. R.; Vehreschild, Mjgt, Heymans, S. R. B.; Henkens, Mthm, Raafs, A. G.; van der Horst, I. C. C.; van Bussel, B. C. T.; Magdelijns, F. J. H.; Lanznaster, J.; Kopylov, P. Y.; Blagova, O. V.; Wille, K.; Pinto, Y. M.; Offerhaus, J. A.; Bleijendaal, H.; Piepel, C.; ten Berg, J. M.; Bor, W. L.; Maarse, M.; Römmele, C.; Tio, R. A.; Sturkenboom, N. H.; Tometten, L.; den Uil, C. A.; Scholte, N. T. B.; Groenendijk, A. L.; Dolff, S.; Zijlstra, L. E.; Hilt, A. D.; von Bergwelt-Baildon, M.; Groenemeijer, B. E.; Merle, U.; van der Zee, P. M.; van Beek, E. A.; Rothfuss, K.; Tjong, F. V. Y.; van der Lingen, A. C. J.; Kolk, M. Z. H.; Isberner, N.; Monraats, P. S.; Magro, M.; Hermans, W. R. M.; Kochanek, M.; Captur, G.; Thomson, R. J.; Nadalin, S.; Linssen, G. C. M.; Veneman, T.; Zaal, R.; Degenhardt, C.; Martens, Fmac, Badings, E. A.; Strauss, R.; Zaman, A. G.; Alkhalil, M.; Prasad, S.; Grüner, B.; Haerkens-Arends, H. E.; Eberwein, L.; Dark, P.; Lomas, D.; vom Dahl, J.; Verschure, D. O.; Hellwig, K.; Mosterd, A.; Rauschning, D.; van der Heijden, D. J.; Neufang, M.; van Hessen, M.; Raichle, C.; Montagna, L.; Mazzilli, S. G.; Bianco, M.; Westhoff, T.; Shafiee, A.; Hedayat, B.; Saneei, E.; Porhosseini, H.; Jensen, B.; Gabriel, L.; Er, A. G.; Kietselaer, Bljh, Schubert, J.; Timmermans, P.; Messiaen, P.; Friedrichs, A.; van den Brink, F. S.; Woudstra, P.; Trauth, J.; Ribeiro, M. I. A.; de With, K.; van der Linden, Mmjm, Kielstein, J. T.; Macías Ruiz, R.; Guggemos, W.; Hellou, E.; Markart, P.; van Kesteren, H. A. M.; Heigener, D.; de Vries, J. K.; Stieglitz, S.; Baltazar, J. B.; Voigt, I.; van de Watering, D. J.; Milovanovic, M.; Redón, J.; Forner, M. J.; Rüddel, J.; Wu, K. W.; Nattermann, J.; Veldhuis, L. I.; Westendorp, I. C. D.; Riedel, C.; Kwakkel-van Erp, J. M.; van Ierssel, S.; van Craenenbroeck, E. M.; Walter, L.; de Sutter, J.; Worm, M.; Drost, J. T.; Moriarty, A.; Salah, R.; Charlotte, N.; van Boxem, A. J. M.; Dorman, H. G. R.; Reidinga, A. C.; van der Meer, P.; Wierda, E.; van Veen, Hpaa, Delsing, C. E.; Meijs, M. F. L.; van de Wal, R. M. A.; Weytjens, C.; Hermanides, R. S.; Emans, M. E.; al-Windy, N. Y. Y.; Koning, A. M. H.; Schellings, Daam, Anthonio, R. L.; Bucciarelli-Ducci, C.; Caputo, M.; Westendorp, P. H. M.; Kuijper, A. F. M.; van Ofwegen-Hanekamp, C. E. E.; Persoon, A. M.; Seelig, J.; van der Harst, P.; Siebelink, H. J.; van Smeden, M.; Williams, S.; Pilgram, L.; van Gilst, W. H.; Tieleman, R. G.; Williams, B.; Asselbergs, F. W..
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-294508

ABSTRACT

Aims Patients with cardiac disease are considered high risk for poor outcomes following hospitalization with COVID-19. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate heterogeneity in associations between various heart disease subtypes and in-hospital mortality. Method and results We used data from the CAPACITY-COVID registry and LEOSS study. Multivariable Poisson regression models were fitted to assess the association between different types of pre-existent heart disease and in-hospital mortality. 16,511 patients with COVID-19 were included (21.1% aged 66 – 75 years;40.2% female) and 31.5% had a history of heart disease. Patients with heart disease were older, predominantly male and often had other comorbid conditions when compared to those without. Mortality was higher in patients with cardiac disease (29.7%;n=1545 versus 15.9%;n=1797). However, following multivariable adjustment this difference was not significant (adjusted risk ratio (aRR) 1.08 [95% CI 1.02 – 1.15;p-value 0.12 (corrected for multiple testing)]). Associations with in-hospital mortality by heart disease subtypes differed considerably, with the strongest association for heart failure aRR (1.19 [1.10 – 1.30];p-value <0.018) particularly for severe NYHA III/IV) heart failure (aRR 1.41 [95% CI 1.20 – 1.64;p-value <0.018]. None of the other heart disease subtypes, including ischemic heart disease, remained significant after multivariable adjustment. Serious cardiac complications were diagnosed in <1% of patients. Conclusion Considerable heterogeneity exists in the strength of association between heart disease subtypes and in-hospital mortality. Of all patients with heart disease, those with heart failure are at greatest risk of death when hospitalized with COVID-19. Serious cardiac complications are rare.

4.
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology ; 32:352, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1490107

ABSTRACT

Background: The Seraph® 100 Microbind® Affinity blood filter has been in use since 2019 for the treatment of difficult to treat blood stream infections.and since 2020 for the treatment of critically ill COVID-19 patients. It is operated under blood flow rates of 100 -350 mL/min, which requires a large bore central line a dialysis catheter. The aim of our study was to evaluate to evaluate the usability of the Seraph® 100 under slow flow conditions through a normal central line (in clinical practice). Methods: A standard hemoperfusion blood tubing system as well as the Seraph® 100 (Exthera Medical, CA, USA) was used. Vascular access was a 20 cm trillumen central venous line (2 x 18 G and 1 x 16 G) that was inserted into a reservoir. The Multifiltrate (Fresenius Medical Care) was used to pump normal saline (n=5) or human plasma (n=5) through the Seraph® 100. Pressures were recored at any given flows (Qb). In two patients connected to a five lumen 20 cm catheter (Certofix Safety Quinto S1220, B. Braun, Melsungen, Germany -1 x 12 G, 1 x 16 G, 3 x 18 G) blood flow as well as arterial and venous pressure were recorded through the 24 h treatment. Results: Using saline or human plasma the Seraph® 100 Microbind®Affinity Blood Filter can be operatied at blood flow rates of up to 100 mL/min even through a 16 & 18 G lumen at tolerable arterial and venous pressures. In men using either the 12 G or the 16 G lumen as arterial line blood a blood flow rate of 50 mL/mon could be onbtained for 24 hours without problems. Conclusions: The Seraph® 100 Microbind®Affinity Blood Filter can be operated at blood flow rates of 50 mL/min even through 16 & 18 G catheters. Arterial and venous pressures depending on the flow (Qb) during hemoperfusion with the Seraph® 100 Microbind® Affinity Blood Filter.

5.
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology ; 32:79-80, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1490102

ABSTRACT

Background: The Seraph®100 Microbind Affinity Blood Filter® is a hemofiltration device that is licensed for pathogen reduction in the blood that received an emergency authorization for the treatment of COVID-19 by the FDA. The aim of this registry was to evaluate safety and efficacy of Seraph 100 treatment for COVID-19 patients. Methods: This is an online registry in which main patient charcteristics, treatment characteristics and outcome parameters of COVID-19 patients, treated with the Seraph100 can be documented without reimbursement. Results: Seventy-five treatment sessions in 60 patients from 12 hospitals were documented in the registry (Fig 1). Overall mortality was 42.3%. Adverse events of the Seraph® 100 treatment were reported in 8 (10.6 %) of the 75 treatments. Eight (10.6 %) of all the procedures ended prematurely due to circuit failure. Non-survivor had a higher rate of bacterial superinfection, higher level of inflammatory laboratory markers (procalcitonin and ferritin) and higher d-dimer levels(Fig 2). While predicted mortality according to SOFA score in ICU patients was >80 %, the observed mortality was 47.6 %. In non-ICU patients, 4C score predicted a mortality of 31.4-34.9 % while the observed mortality was 22.2 %. Conclusions: Seraph 100 treatment was well tolerated and circuit failure rate was significantly lower than reported for KRT in COVID-19 patients. Compared to the calculated mortality, the observed mortality in the registry was lower.

6.
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation ; 36(SUPPL 1):i386, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1402500

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The COVID-19 pandemic has serious impact on health and economics worldwide. Despite the recent advent of SARS-Cov-2 vaccines, treatment options are needed, yet pharmacologic interventions remain limited. Several extracorporeal treatments are currently explored concerning their potential to improve the clinical course and outcome of critically ill patients with COVID-19. The Seraph® 100 Microbind® Affinity adsorber (Exthera Medical, CA, USA) has recently been introduced for the elimination of several pathogens from the blood and an emergency authorization in patients with COVID-19 was granted by the FDA. Bacteria, viruses (including the SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein), fungi and toxins have been shown to bind to the immobilized heparin on the ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene beads of the device in a similar way to the interaction with heparan sulfate on the cellsurface and are thereby removed from the bloodstream. Here we report the interim analysis of the COVID-19 patients treated with the Seraph® 100 Microbind® Affinity filter (COSA) registry. The goal of the registry is to gather data regarding the safety and efficacy of the Seraph® 100 in the treatment of COVID-19 patients. METHOD: Participating sites were advised to insert patient data of COVID-19 patients, treated with the Seraph® 100, during their hospital stay into the COSA registry (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04361500). A total of 66 items were asked in a web-based platform. RESULTS: Until January 2021, 33 patients with 39 treatment sessions form six different hospitals were reported to the register (seven female, median age 61 years, Table 1). The patients were treated between March and December 2020. Eleven patients with a hospital admission between March and August and 22 between September and December 2020. The Seraph® 100 treatment was initiated 9 days after symptom onset, without any difference between survivors and non-survivors. Overall, a mortality of 27% was reported. Serious comorbidities (as preadmission immunosuppressive therapy, lung fibrosis or CKD5T) were reported in all of the nonsurvivors. Invasive ventilation was needed in 67% of these patients when Seraph treatment was initiated. A non-significant trend towards higher Ferritin levels in nonsurvivors (2000 (1963 - 8326) vs. 989 (644 - 2000), p=0.09) was reported. All treatments were well tolerated, three clotting events were reported. CONCLUSION: Viral SARS-CoV-2 RNA is frequently (up to 78%) seen in the blood of critically ill COVID-19 patients and correlates with the severity of the disease. The Seraph® 100 can bind to viral spike protein, proinflammatory cytokines may be reduced by the device and hemodynamic stabilization has been reported during the Seraph® 100 treatment of COVID-19 patients. Platelets can be hyperactivated in association with SARS-CoV-2 proteins and thus presumably trigger the hypercoagulation and thrombosis. In this context, the removal of SARS-CoV-2 proteins to prevent hyperactivated platelets appears to be a sensible approach. All reported deaths were associated with serious preexisting comorbidities, immunosuppression, dialysis dependent renal failure, or a combination of these factors. Hence, Seraph® 100 treatment may be most beneficial in COVID-19 courses of patients without multi organ failure. More clinical data is needed to describe possible benefits of the Seraph® 100 in the treatment of COVID-19 patients. (Table Presented).

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL