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1.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 9(Supplement 2):S691, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2189872

ABSTRACT

Background. Although COVID-19 is a viral infection, it is known that antibiotics are often prescribed due to concerns about combined bacterial infection. Therefore, we aimed to analyze how many patients with COVID-19 received the antibiotic prescription as well as what kinds of factors contributed to it using the National Health Insurance database. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed claims data for adults 19 years of age and older hospitalized for COVID-19 from December 1, 2019 to December 31, 2020. According to severity classification of the National Institutes of Health guidelines, we calculated not only the proportion of patients receiving antibiotics but also days of treatment per 1000 patient days. In addition, we investigated the factors contributing to antibiotic use by linear regression analysis. Results. Of the 55,228 patients, 47% were male, 55% were older than 50 years of age, and most patients (89%) had no underlying diseases. The majority (84%, 46,576) were classified as having mild to moderate illness, with 11% (6,168) and 5% (2,484) having severe and critical, respectively. Antibiotics were prescribed in a total of 27% (15,081). While 74% of patients with severe illness and 88% of those with critical illness received antibiotic treatment, even 18% of mild to moderate cases were prescribed antibiotics. Fluoroquinolones were the most commonly prescribed antibiotics (8,348), followed by third generation cephalosporins (5,729) and beta-lactam/betalactamase inhibitors (3,822) as shown in Figure 1. Older age, severity of disease and underlying medical conditions contributed to overall prescription rates as well as days of antibiotic use significantly (Table 1). Conclusion. Although most of COVID-19 patients had mild to moderate illness, more than a quarter were prescribed antibiotics. Judicious use of broad-spectrum antibiotics is necessary for COVID-19 patients, considering the severity of disease and the risk of bacterial co-infection.

2.
J Hosp Infect ; 129: 22-30, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2049480

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hospital infection control measures against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are often based on expert discretion due to the lack of detailed guidelines. AIM: To survey the current strategies for preventing the transmission of COVID-19 in medical institutions. METHODS: Thirteen key issues related to the prevention of COVID-19 transmission within medical institutions were selected via discussion among infectious diseases specialists, and related critical questions were obtained following a review of national-level guidelines in government databases. Six hospitals had an open survey between 11th and 25th August 2020 to provide responses to these topics. An online questionnaire developed from these data was sent to infection control teams at 46 hospitals in South Korea between 31st January 2021 and 20th February 2021. FINDINGS: All 46 hospitals responded to the survey. All operated screening clinics, but 89.1% (41/46) allowed symptomatic patients without COVID-19-associated symptoms to visit general outpatient clinics. Most hospitals (87.2%, 34/39) conducted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for all hospitalized patients. Of 35/46 (76.1%) hospitals with pre-emptive isolation policies for hospitalized patients, 31 (88.6%) released patients from isolation after a single negative PCR test, while most (76.9%, 20/26) allowed shared-room accommodation for patients meeting the national criteria for release from isolation despite positive PCR results with above cycle threshold values (34.6%, 9/26), or after a certain period that satisfied the national criteria (26.9%, 7/26). CONCLUSION: Individual hospitals in South Korea are currently relying on experience to frame relevant guidelines, and responded differently to some infection control issues on hospital settings during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Hospitals , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Special Interest Group on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques Conference - Art Gallery, SIGGRAPH 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2020393

ABSTRACT

The human body has historically been a constant source of fascination in the arts and sciences. With the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the debate over the virtues and disadvantages of physical versus virtual bodies has increased dramatically. One of the most difficult attributes of the human body to translate into other forms is the essence of human movement and, by extension, energy. Radiant Soma emphasizes the ephemerality of human movement by visualizing motion capture data with light. The installation of lasers and phosphorescent objects transforms choreography that the original performer can no longer perform into a constant stream of lively spirits. © 2022 Owner/Author.

4.
Journal of Men's Health ; 18(3), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1780434

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Korean men are withdrawing from social interactions and feeling depressed due to financial difficulties. This depression can be reduced through physical activities and use of social media for communication. Therefore, this study aims to examine activities effective in reducing depression by analyzing the differences in physical activities and levels of social media addiction, depending on the level of depression. Methods: A total of 591 Korean males affected by the COVID-19 pandemic participated in the study. Results were extracted by frequency analysis, descriptive statistical analysis, chi-square test, and t-test using SPSS 25.0 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA). Results: Chi-square test, which analyzed differences in demographic characteristics based on the level of depression, revealed significant differences in monthly average family incomes, levels of participation in physical leisure activities, extent of social media usage and kinds of social media used. Significant differences existed in high-intensity physical activities as well as social media non-addiction and addiction depending on the level of depression. Conclusions: Since COVID-19 is increasing depression in males, government or health-related institutes need to provide spacious areas to engage in physical activities, which may help reduce suicidal ideation and restore mental health in Korean males. Moreover, there is a need to develop diverse health-related social media contents, which can help reduce depression. Thus, it has been thought that places to perform physical activities and sufficient communication with others on social media can prove helpful in managing depression.

5.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 8(SUPPL 1):S316-S317, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1746565

ABSTRACT

Background. Infection control measures against the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) within a hospital often rely on expert experience and intuition due to the lack of clear guidelines. This study surveyed current strategies for the prevention of the spread of COVID-19 in medical institutions. Methods. Upon systematic review of the guidelines at the national level, 14 key topics were selected. Six hospitals were provided an open survey that assessed their responses to these topics between August 11 and 25, 2020. Using these data, an online questionnaire was developed and sent to the infection control teams of 46 hospitals in South Korea. The survey was conducted between January 31, 2021, and February 20, 2021. Results. All 46 hospitals responded to the survey, and 24 hospitals (52.2%) had treated 100 or more cases of COVID-19. All hospitals operated screening clinics, and the criteria were respiratory symptoms (100%), fever (97.8%), and epidemiological association (93.5%). It was found that 89.1% (41/46) of hospitals allowed symptomatic patients to visit their general outpatient clinics if fever or respiratory symptoms were not associated with COVID-19. Most hospitals (87.2%;34/39) conducted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for all hospitalized patients. Moreover, 76.1% (35/46) of hospitals implemented preemptive isolation policies for hospitalized patients, of which 97.1% (34/35) were released from isolation after a single negative PCR test. A little over half of the hospitals (58.7%;27/46) treated patients that met the national criteria for release from isolation but consistently had positive PCR results. Of these hospitals, 63% (17/27) used N95/KF94 masks, and 40.7% (11/27) used surgical masks without other personal protective equipment for treating them. Most hospitals (76.9%;20/26) accommodated them in shared rooms when the cycle threshold value of the PCR test was more than a certain value (34.6%;9/26), or after a certain period that satisfied the national criteria (26.9%;7/26). Finally, 76.1% (35/46) of hospitals performed emergency procedures or operations on suspected patients. Conclusion. Various guidelines were being applied by each medical institution, but there was a lack of an explicit set of national guidelines to support them.

6.
Journal of Crohn's & colitis ; 14(12):1780-1784, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1672170

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDS AND AIMS: We aimed to evaluate the safety of Bacille Calmette-Guerin [BCG] vaccination in infants born to mothers receiving anti-tumour necrosis factor [anti-TNF] therapy for inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Adverse events of BCG vaccination were evaluated in 90 infants who were last exposed to anti-TNF agents at a median of gestational week 30. RESULTS: After receiving BCG vaccination at a median age of 6 months [range, 0.25-11 months], three infants [3.3%] showed injection site swelling, two of whom also showed axillar lymphadenopathy. The rates of adverse events were similar between infants who were last exposed to anti-TNF agents before the third trimester [n = 35] and those who were last exposed in the third trimester [n = 55] [2.9% vs 3.6%;p = 1.00]. All adverse events were spontaneously resolved and there were no serious adverse events such as active tuberculosis infection or death. CONCLUSIONS: BCG vaccination after 6 months of age is of low risk in infants exposed to anti-TNF agents in utero.

7.
Arutyunov, G. P.; Tarlovskaya, E. I.; Arutyunov, A. G.; Belenkov, Y. N.; Konradi, A. O.; Lopatin, Y. M.; Rebrov, A. P.; Tereshchenko, S. N.; Chesnikova, A. I.; Hayrapetyan, H. G.; Babin, A. P.; Bakulin, I. G.; Bakulina, N. V.; Balykova, L. A.; Blagonravova, A. S.; Boldina, M. V.; Vaisberg, A. R.; Galyavich, A. S.; Gomonova, V. V.; Grigorieva, N. U.; Gubareva, I. V.; Demko, I. V.; Evzerikhina, A. V.; Zharkov, A. V.; Kamilova, U. K.; Kim, Z. F.; Kuznetsova, T. Yu, Lareva, N. V.; Makarova, E. V.; Malchikova, S. V.; Nedogoda, S. V.; Petrova, M. M.; Pochinka, I. G.; Protasov, K. V.; Protsenko, D. N.; Ruzanov, D. Yu, Sayganov, S. A.; Sarybaev, A. Sh, Selezneva, N. M.; Sugraliev, A. B.; Fomin, I. V.; Khlynova, O. V.; Chizhova, O. Yu, Shaposhnik, I. I.; Sсhukarev, D. A.; Abdrahmanova, A. K.; Avetisian, S. A.; Avoyan, H. G.; Azarian, K. K.; Aimakhanova, G. T.; Ayipova, D. A.; Akunov, A. Ch, Alieva, M. K.; Aparkina, A. V.; Aruslanova, O. R.; Ashina, E. Yu, Badina, O. Y.; Barisheva, O. Yu, Batchayeva, A. S.; Bitieva, A. M.; Bikhteyev, I. U.; Borodulina, N. A.; Bragin, M. V.; Budu, A. M.; Burygina, L. A.; Bykova, G. A.; Varlamova, D. D.; Vezikova, N. N.; Verbitskaya, E. A.; Vilkova, O. E.; Vinnikova, E. A.; Vustina, V. V.; Gаlova, E. A.; Genkel, V. V.; Gorshenina, E. I.; Gostishev, R. V.; Grigorieva, E. V.; Gubareva, E. Yu, Dabylova, G. M.; Demchenko, A. I.; Dolgikh, O. Yu, Duvanov, I. A.; Duyshobayev, M. Y.; Evdokimov, D. S.; Egorova, K. E.; Ermilova, A. N.; Zheldybayeva, A. E.; Zarechnova, N. V.; Ivanova, S. Yu, Ivanchenko, E. Yu, Ilina, M. V.; Kazakovtseva, M. V.; Kazymova, E. V.; Kalinina, Y. S.; Kamardina, N. A.; Karachenova, A. M.; Karetnikov, I. A.; Karoli, N. A.; Karpov, O. V.; Karsiev, M. Kh, Кaskaeva, D. S.; Kasymova, K. F.; Kerimbekova, Z. B.; Kerimova, A. Sh, Kim, E. S.; Kiseleva, N. V.; Klimenko, D. A.; Klimova, A. V.; Kovalishena, O. V.; Kolmakova, E. V.; Kolchinskaya, T. P.; Kolyadich, M. I.; Kondriakova, O. V.; Konoval, M. P.; Konstantinov, D. Yu, Konstantinova, E. A.; Kordukova, V. A.; Koroleva, E. V.; Kraposhina, A. Yu, Kriukova, T. V.; Kuznetsova, A. S.; Kuzmina, T. Y.; Kuzmichev, K. V.; Kulchoroeva, C. K.; Kuprina, T. V.; Kouranova, I. M.; Kurenkova, L. V.; Kurchugina, N. Yu, Kushubakova, N. A.; Levankova, V. I.; Levin, M. E.; Lyubavina, N. A.; Magdeyeva, N. A.; Mazalov, K. V.; Majseenko, V. I.; Makarova, A. S.; Maripov, A. M.; Marusina, A. A.; Melnikov, E. S.; Moiseenko, N. B.; Muradova, F. N.; Muradyan, R. G.; Musaelian, S. N.; Nikitina, N. M.; Ogurlieva, B. B.; Odegova, A. A.; Omarova, Y. M.; Omurzakova, N. A.; Ospanova, S. O.; Pahomova, E. V.; Petrov, L. D.; Plastinina, S. S.; Pogrebetskaya, V. A.; Polyakov, D. S.; Ponomarenko, E. V.; Popova, L. L.; Prokofeva, N. A.; Pudova, I. A.; Rakov, N. A.; Rakhimov, A. N.; Rozanova, N. A.; Serikbolkyzy, S.; Simonov, A. A.; Skachkova, V. V.; Smirnova, L. A.; Soloveva, D. V.; Soloveva, I. A.; Sokhova, F. M.; Subbotin, A. K.; Sukhomlinova, I. M.; Sushilova, A. G.; Tagayeva, D. R.; Titojkina, Y. V.; Tikhonova, E. P.; Tokmin, D. S.; Torgunakova, M. S.; Trenogina, K. V.; Trostianetckaia, N. A.; Trofimov, D. A.; Tulichev, A. A.; Tupitsin, D. I.; Tursunova, A. T.; Ulanova, N. D.; Fatenkov, O. V.; Fedorishina, O. V.; Fil, T. S.; Fomina, I. Yu, Fominova, I. S.; Frolova, I. A.; Tsvinger, S. M.; Tsoma, V. V.; Cholponbaeva, M. B.; Chudinovskikh, T. I.; Shakhgildyan, L. D.; Shevchenko, O. A.; Sheshina, T. V.; Shishkina, E. A.; Shishkov, K. Yu, Sherbakov, S. Y.; Yausheva, E. A..
Russian Journal of Cardiology ; 26(4):116-131, 2021.
Article in Russian | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1488885

ABSTRACT

The international AKTIV register presents a detailed description of out-and inpatients with COVID-19 in the Eurasian region. It was found that hospitalized patients had more comorbidities. In addition, these patients were older and there were more men than among outpatients. Among the traditional risk factors, obesity and hypertension had a significant negative effect on prognosis, which was more significant for patients 60 years of age and older. Among comorbidities, CVDs had the maximum negative effect on prognosis, and this effect was more significant for patients 60 years of age and older. Among other comorbidities, type 2 and 1 diabetes, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cancer and anemia had a negative impact on the prognosis. This effect was also more significant (with the exception of type 1 diabetes) for patients 60 years and older. The death risk in patients with COVID-19 depended on the severity and type of multimorbidity. Clusters of diseases typical for deceased patients were identified and their impact on prognosis was determined. The most unfavorable was a cluster of 4 diseases, including hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, and diabetes mellitus. The data obtained should be taken into account when planning measures for prevention (vaccination priority groups), treatment and rehabilitation of COVID-19 survivors.

8.
Arutyunov, G. P.; Tarlovskaya, E. I.; Arutyunov, A. G.; Belenkov, Y. N.; Konradi, A. O.; Lopatin, Y. M.; Rebrov, A. P.; Tereshchenko, S. N.; Che Snikova, A. I.; Hayrapetyan, H. G.; Babin, A. P.; Bakulin, I. G.; Bakulina, N. V.; Balykova, L. A.; Blagonravova, A. S.; Boldina, M. V.; Vaisberg, A. R.; Galyavich, A. S.; Gomonova, V. V.; Grigorieva, N. U.; Gubareva, I. V.; Demko, I. V.; Evzerikhina, A. V.; Zharkov, A. V.; Kamilova, U. K.; Kim, Z. F.; Kuznetsova, T. Yu, Lareva, N. V.; Makarova, E. V.; Malchikova, S. V.; Nedogoda, S. V.; Petrova, M. M.; Pochinka, I. G.; Protasov, K. V.; Protsenko, D. N.; Ruzanov, D. Yu, Sayganov, S. A.; Sarybaev, A. Sh, Selezneva, N. M.; Sugraliev, A. B.; Fomin, I. V.; Khlynova, O. V.; Chizhova, O. Yu, Shaposhnik, I. I.; Sсhukarev, D. A.; Abdrahmanova, A. K.; Avetisian, S. A.; Avoyan, H. G.; Azarian, K. K.; Aimakhanova, G. T.; Ayipova, D. A.; Akunov, A. Ch, Alieva, M. K.; Aparkina, A. V.; Aruslanova, O. R.; Ashina, E. Yu, Badina, O. Y.; Barisheva, O. Yu, Batchayeva, A. S.; Bitieva, A. M.; Bikhteyev, I. U.; Borodulina, N. A.; Bragin, M. V.; Budu, A. M.; Burygina, L. A.; Bykova, G. A.; Varlamova, D. D.; Vezikova, N. N.; Ver Bitskaya, E. A.; Vilkova, O. E.; Vinnikova, E. A.; Vustina, V. V.; Gаlova, E. A.; Genkel, V. V.; Gorshenina, E. I.; Gostishev, R. V.; Grigorieva, E. V.; Gubareva, E. Yu, Dabylova, G. M.; Demchenko, A. I.; Dolgikh, O. Yu, Duvanov, I. A.; Duyshobayev, M. Y.; Evdokimov, D. S.; Egorova, K. E.; Ermilova, A. N.; Zheldybayeva, A. E.; Zarechnova, N. V.; Ivanova, S. Yu, Ivanchenko, E. Yu, Ilina, M. V.; Kazakovtseva, M. V.; Kazymova, E. V.; Kalinina, Yu S.; Kamardina, N. A.; Karachenova, A. M.; Karetnikov, I. A.; Karoli, N. A.; Karpov, O. V.; Karsiev, M. Kh, Кaskaeva, D. S.; Kasymova, K. F.; Kerimbekova, Zh B.; Kerimova, A. Sh, Kim, E. S.; Kiseleva, N. V.; Klimenko, D. A.; Klimova, A. V.; Kovalishena, O. V.; Kolmakova, E. V.; Kolchinskaya, T. P.; Kolyadich, M. I.; Kondriakova, O. V.; Konoval, M. P.; Konstantinov, D. Yu, Konstantinova, E. A.; Kordukova, V. A.; Koroleva, E. V.; Kraposhina, A. Yu, Kriukova, T. V.; Kuznetsova, A. S.; Kuzmina, T. Y.; Kuzmichev, K. V.; Kulchoroeva, Ch K.; Kuprina, T. V.; Kouranova, I. M.; Kurenkova, L. V.; Kurchugina, N. Yu, Kushubakova, N. A.; Levankova, V. I.; Levin, M. E.; Lyubavina, N. A.; Magdeyeva, N. A.; Mazalov, K. V.; Majseenko, V. I.; Makarova, A. S.; Maripov, A. M.; Marusina, A. A.; Melnikov, E. S.; Moiseenko, N. B.; Muradova, F. N.; Muradyan, R. G.; Musaelian, Sh N.; Nikitina, N. M.; Ogurlieva, B. B.; Odegova, A. A.; Omarova, Yu M.; Omurzakova, N. A.; Ospanova, Sh O.; Pahomova, E. V.; Petrov, L. D.; Plastinina, S. S.; Pogrebetskaya, V. A.; Polyakov, D. S.; Ponomarenko, E. V.; Popova, L. L.; Prokofeva, N. A.; Pudova, I. A.; Rakov, N. A.; Rakhimov, A. N.; Rozanova, N. A.; Serikbolkyzy, S.; Simonov, A. A.; Skachkova, V. V.; Smirnova, L. A.; Soloveva, D. V.; Soloveva, I. A.; Sokhova, F. M.; Subbotin, A. K.; Sukhomlinova, I. M.; Sushilova, A. G.; Tagayeva, D. R.; Titojkina, Y. V.; Tikhonova, E. P.; Tokmin, D. S.; Torgunakova, M. S.; Trenogina, K. V.; Trostianetckaia, N. A.; Trofimov, D. A.; Tulichev, A. A.; Tupitsin, D. I.; Tursunova, A. T.; Tiurin, A. A.; Ulanova, N. D.; Fatenkov, O. V.; Fedorishina, O. V.; Fil, T. S.; Fomina, I. Yu, Fominova, I. S.; Frolova, I. A.; Tsvinger, S. M.; Tsoma, V. V.; Cholponbaeva, M. B.; Chudinovskikh, T. I.; Shakhgildyan, L. D.; Shevchenko, O. A.; Sheshina, T. V.; Shishkina, E. A.; Shishkov, K. Yu, Sherbakov, S. Y.; Yausheva, E. A..
Russian Journal of Cardiology ; 26(3):102-113, 2021.
Article in Russian | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1488882

ABSTRACT

The organizer of the registers “Dynamics analysis of comorbidities in SARS-CoV-2 survivors” (AKTIV) and “Analysis of hospitalizations of comorbid patients infected during the second wave of SARS-CoV-2 outbreak” (AKTIV 2) is the Eurasian Association of Therapists (EAT). Currently, there are no clinical registries in the Eurasian region designed to collect and analyze information on long-term outcomes of COVID-19 survivors with comorbid conditions. The aim of the register is to assess the impact of a novel coronavirus infection on long-term course of chronic non-communicable diseases 3, 6, 12 months after recovery, as well as to obtain information on the effect of comorbidity on the severity of COVID-19. Analysis of hospitalized patients of a possible second wave is planned for register “AKTIV 2”. To achieve this goal, the register will include men and women over 18 years of age diagnosed with COVID-19 who are treated in a hospital or in outpatient basis. The register includes 25 centers in 5 federal districts of the Russian Federation, centers in the Republic of Armenia, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the Republic of Kyrgyzstan, the Republic of Belarus, the Republic of Moldova, and the Republic of Uzbekistan. The estimated capacity of the register is 5400 patients.

9.
Molecular Therapy ; 28(4):416-417, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1379239

ABSTRACT

Background: Novel coronaviruses (CoV) caused 3 global outbreaks over the past 2 decades: SARS-CoV (2002), MERS-CoV (2012), and 2019-nCoV in Wuhan, China. Each caused pneumonia with mortality of 10%, 35% and 2%, respectively (2019-nCoV estimated). GLS-5300 DNA vaccine targeting MERS-CoV Spike (S) was first to enter clinical trial, was safe and immunogenic (Lancet ID;2019). In Phase I, a 3 dose series at Day0, 4 and 12 weeks of GLS-5300 at either 0.67, 2 or 6mg was given IM followed by electroporation (EP, IM+EP) with CELLECTRA-5P device. GLS-5300 induced antibodies (Abs) in 94%, Tcell response in 76%, and neutralizing Abs in 50% of participants. No dose response was observed. GLS-5300 response was similar to those recovered from natural MERS-CoV infection. The absence of dose response and prior experience showing benefits of ID+EP vs IM+EP (JID;2019) led us to design this trial of lower ID dosing with an arm for a 2-dose regimen. We report results from MERS-002, the ongoing Phase I/IIa study of GLS-5300. Methods: MERS-002 is an open label, dose ranging, phase I/IIa study of GLS-5300. Participants were enrolled at 2 Korean sites into 3 groups receiving GLS-5300 ID+EP with the CELLECTRA-3P device: Group 1 received three 0.3mg doses at Day0 and weeks 4 and 12;Group 2 received three 0.6mg doses at Day0 and weeks 4 and 12;Group 3 received two 0.6mg doses at Day0 and week 8. Safety and tolerability of GLS-5300 was evaluated at each visit. Samples were collected at baseline, before each dose, and at both 2 and 4 weeks post dose 2 and post dose 3. Study data through 4 weeks after the primary series for a subset of immunoassays were included here. Findings: GLS-5300 given ID+EP was well-tolerated with no vaccine-associated SAEs. Preliminary results were available for: full length S (flS) ELISA, EMC2012-Vero neutralization (MERS-neut) and MERS-CoV S IFNg ELISPOT. GLS-5300 at 0.6mg induced MERS-CoV-specific Abs by flS ELISA and MERS-neut in 74% and 48%, respectively, after 1 dose. After the 2 or 3 dose vaccine series at 0.6mg per dose, flS ELISA response was seen in 100% and 92% of participants, respectively. MERS-neut response was 92% in both 2 and 3 dose 0.6mg groups. Antibody responses and rates were higher during and after primary series in 0.6mg group regardless of regimen than 0.3mg per dose. GLS-5300 induced Tcell responses via MERS-CoV IFNg ELISPOT in 60% and 84% receiving 0.6mg after the 2 or 3 dose series, respectively. Compared to 0.67mg of GLS-5300 given IM+EP in the first trial, 0.6mg of GLS-5300 given ID+EP in MERS-002, binding Abs appeared sooner and neutralizing Abs were observed in a higher fraction of participants (92% vs 50%) while Tcell reactivity was similar between vaccination schema. Conclusions: GLS-5300 was well tolerated with no vaccine-associated SAEs. Like prior studies, DNA vaccines given by ID+EP had fewer injection-related AEs relative to IM+EP. In MERS-002, 0.6mg of GLS-5300 in a 2-dose regimen spanning 8 weeks had similar reactivity and rate to the longer 3-dose regimen. GLS-5300 was safe and immunogenic when given IM+EP and, similarly, when given ID+EP in both 2- and 3-dose regimens in this ongoing MERS-002 Phase I/IIa trial. A Phase II clinical evaluation of the use of GLS-5300 to prevent MERS-CoV infection in endemic regions is planned.

10.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 39(15 SUPPL), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1339260

ABSTRACT

Background: Cancer patients are more susceptible to developing severe disease associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Herein, data from a high-volume cancer center is presented highlighting risk factors associated with hospitalization with COVID-19 disease. Methods: Cancer patients in the Levine Cancer Institute COVID19 database who were tested for SARS-CoV-2 due to clinical illness from March 1, 2020 to October 29, 2020 with 90 days follow-up are described here. Patients' demographic and clinical information were retrospectively entered into a REDCap database from chart reviews. Differences in distributions were identified between hospitalized and nonhospitalized patients using the chi-squared test with uni- and multivariable logistic regression models. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results: 228 patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection were identified, of whom 103 (45%) were hospitalized. Median age was 63 years (range 28-95). Race distribution for infection showed White 65%, followed by Black 26.8% and Hispanic ethnicity 16.7% , with a similar distribution for hospital admission. Median length of stay was 10 days (range 1-91) with no readmissions within 90 days. The most common underlying malignancies were breast (29.8%), hematologic (21.1%) and genitourinary (12.3%). The most common preexisting conditions included hypertension (55.7%), diabetes (27.2%) and cardiac disease (3.9%). The most common presenting symptoms were cough (50.2%), fever (38.4%), fatigue (37.8%) and shortness of breath (36.4%). Maximum oxygen requirements for hospitalized patients were ambient air (34%), nasal canula (34%), high/medium flow nasal canula (10%), non-invasive ventilation (13%) and mechanical ventilation (10%). Case fatality rate was 10% with diagnosis of COVID-19, including 21.4% of those admitted to the hospital and 51.7% of those admitted to the ICU. Univariable logistic regression analysis showed that age, sex, prior chemotherapy, upper gastrointestinal cancers, hematologic cancers, number of medical conditions, cardiac disease, chronic lung diseases, hypertension, and diabetes increased risk of hospitalization. Table shows results of multivariate analysis. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused high case fatality rates in our cancer patients. We identified age, cardiac disease, hematologic malignancy and receipt of chemotherapy within 4 weeks of diagnosis as risk factors for hospitalization. These data may help in prioritizing early intervention in vulnerable subgroups to improve survival outcomes.

11.
Arutyunov, G. P.; Tarlovskaya, E. I.; Arutyunov, A. G.; Belenkov, Y. N.; Konradi, A. O.; Lopatin, Y. M.; Tereshchenko, S. N.; Rebrov, A. P.; Chesnikova, A. I.; Fomin, I. V.; Grigorieva, N. U.; Boldina, M. V.; Vaisberg, A. R.; Blagonravova, A. S.; Makarova, E. V.; Shaposhnik, I. I.; Kuznetsova, T. Yu, Malchikova, S. V.; Protsenko, D. N.; Evzerikhina, A. V.; Petrova, M. M.; Demko, I. V.; Safonov, D. V.; Hayrapetyan, H. G.; Galyavich, A. S.; Kim, Z. F.; Sugraliev, A. B.; Nedogoda, S. V.; Tsoma, V. V.; Sayganov, S. A.; Gomonova, V. V.; Gubareva, I. V.; Sarybaev, A. Sh, Koroleva, E. V.; Vilkova, O. E.; Fomina, I. Y.; Pudova, I. A.; Soloveva, D. V.; Kiseleva, N. V.; Zelyaeva, N. V.; Kouranova, I. M.; Pogrebetskaya, V. A.; Muradova, F. N.; Badina, O. Y.; Kovalishena, O. V.; Galova, E. A.; Plastinina, S. S.; Lyubavina, N. A.; Vezikova, N. N.; Levankova, V. I.; Ivanova, S. Yu, Ermilova, A. N.; Muradyan, R. G.; Gostishev, R. V.; Tikhonova, E. P.; Kuzmina, T. Y.; Soloveva, I. A.; Kraposhina, A. Yu, Kolyadich, M. I.; Kolchinskaya, T. P.; Genkel, V. V.; Kuznetsova, A. S.; Kazakovtseva, M. V.; Odegova, A. A.; Chudinovskikh, T. I.; Baramzina, S. V.; Rozanova, N. A.; Kerimova, A. Sh, Krivosheina, N. A.; Chukhlova, S. Y.; Levchenko, A. A.; Avoyan, H. G.; Azarian, K. K.; Musaelian, Sh N.; Avetisian, S. A.; Levin, M. E.; Karpov, O. V.; Sokhova, F. M.; Burygina, L. A.; Sheshina, T. V.; Tiurin, A. A.; Dolgikh, O. Yu, Kazymova, E. V.; Konstantinov, D. Yu, Chumakova, O. A.; Kondriakova, O. V.; Shishkov, K. Yu, Fil, T. S.; Prokofeva, N. A.; Konoval, M. P.; Simonov, A. A.; Bitieva, A. M.; Trostianetckaia, N. A.; Cholponbaeva, M. B.; Kerimbekova, Zh B.; Duyshobayev, M. Y.; Akunov, A. Ch, Kushubakova, N. A.; Melnikov, E. S.; Kim, E. S.; Sherbakov, S. Y.; Trofimov, D. A.; Evdokimov, D. S.; Ayipova, D. A.; Duvanov, I. A.; Abdrakhmanova, A. K.; Aimakhanova, G. T.; Ospanova, Sh O.; Dabylova, G. M.; Tursunova, A. T.; Kaskaeva, D. S.; Tulichev, A. A.; Ashina, E. Yu, Kordukova, V. A.; Barisheva, O. Yu, Egorova, K. E.; Varlamova, D. D.; Kuprina, T. V.; Pakhomova, E. V.; Kurchugina, N. Yu, Frolova, I. A.; Mazalov, K. V.; Subbotin, A. K.; Kamardina, N. A.; Zarechnova, N. V.; Mamutova, E. M.; Smirnova, L. A.; Klimova, A. V.; Shakhgildyan, L. D.; Tokmin, D. S.; Tupitsin, D. I.; Kriukova, T. V.; Rakov, N. A.; Polyakov, D. S..
Russian Journal of Cardiology ; 25(11):98-107, 2020.
Article in Russian | Russian Science Citation Index | ID: covidwho-1094455

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a severe infection with high mortality. The concept of the disease has been shaped to a greater extent on the basis of large registers from the USA, Spain, Italy, and China. However, there is no information on the disease characteristics in Caucasian patients. Therefore, we created an international register with the estimated capacity of 5,000 patients - Dynamics Analysis of Comorbidities in SARS-CoV-2 Survivors (AKTIV SARS-CoV-2), which brought together professionals from the Russian Federation, Republic of Armenia, Republic of Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyz Republic. The article presents the first analysis of the register involving 1,003 patients. It was shown that the most significant difference of the Caucasian population was the higher effect of multimorbidity on the mortality risk vs other registers. More pronounced effect on mortality of such diseases as diabetes, obesity, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and age over 60 years was also revealed. COVID-19 - тяжелое инфекционное заболевание с высоким риском летального исхода. Представление о болезни во многом сформировано на основании крупных регистров, выполненных в США, Испании, Италии, КНР. Однако к настоящему времени нет данных по особенностям протекания болезни у пациентов евроазиатского региона. В связи с этим был создан международный регистр, расчетная мощность которого составляет 5000 пациентов, “Анализ динамики Коморбидных заболеваний у пациенТов, перенесшИх инфицироВание SARS-CoV-2” (AКТИВ SARS-CoV-2), работа в котором объединила специалистов Российской Федерации, Республики Армения, Республики Казахстан и Кыргызской Республики. В статье представлен первый анализ регистра, который включил данные 1003 пациентов. Показано, что самым значимым отличием евроазиатской популяции пациентов оказалось гораздо большее влияние полиморбидности на риск летального исхода в сравнении с другими регистрами, а также более выраженное влияние на риск летального исхода в евроазиатской популяции таких заболеваний, как сахарный диабет, ожирение, артериальная гипертензия, хроническая болезнь почек и возраста старше 60 лет.

12.
Arutyunov, G. P.; Tarlovskaya, E. I.; Arutyunov, A. G.; Belenkov, Y. N.; Konradi, A. O.; Lopatin, Y. M.; Tereshchenko, S. N.; Rebrov, A. P.; Chesnikova, A. I.; Fomin, I. V.; Grigorieva, N. U.; Boldina, V. M.; Vaisberg, A. R.; Blagonravova, A. S.; Makarova, E. V.; Shaposhnik, II, Kuznetsova, T. Y.; Malchikova, S. V.; Protsenko, D. N.; Evzerikhina, A. V.; Petrova, M. M.; Demko, I. V.; Saphonov, D. V.; Hayrapetyan, H. G.; Galyavich, A. S.; Kim, Z. F.; Sugraliev, A. B.; Nedogoda, S. V.; Tsoma, V. V.; Sayganov, S. A.; Gomonova, V. V.; Gubareva, I. V.; Sarybaev, A. S.; Ruzanau, D. Y.; Majseenko, V. I.; Babin, A. P.; Kamilova, U. K.; Koroleva, E. V.; Vilkova, O. E.; Fomina, I. Y.; Pudova, I. A.; Soloveva, D. V.; Doshchannikov, D. A.; Kiseleva, N. V.; Zelyaeva, N. V.; Kouranova, I. M.; Pogrebetskaya, V. A.; Muradova, F. N.; Badina, O. Y.; Kovalishena, O. V.; Gsmall a, Cyrilliclova A. E.; Plastinina, S. S.; Grigorovich, M. S.; Lyubavina, N. A.; Vezikova, N. N.; Levankova, V. I.; Ivanova, S. Y.; Ermilova, A. N.; Muradyan, R. G.; Gostishev, R. V.; Tikhonova, E. P.; Kuzmina, T. Y.; Soloveva, I. A.; Kraposhina, A. Y.; Kolyadich, M. I.; Kolchinskaya, T. P.; Genkel, V. V.; Kuznetsova, A. S.; Kazakovtseva, M. V.; Odegova, A. A.; Chudinovskikh, T. I.; Baramzina, S. V.; Rozanova, N. A.; Kerimova, A. S.; Krivosheina, N. A.; Chukhlova, S. Y.; Levchenko, A. A.; Avoyan, H. G.; Azarian, K. K.; Musaelian, S. N.; Avetisian, S. A.; Levin, M. E.; Karpov, O. V.; Sokhova, F. M.; Burygina, L. A.; Sheshina, T. V.; Tiurin, A. A.; Dolgikh, O. Y.; Kazymova, E. V.; Konstantinov, D. Y.; Chumakova, O. A.; Kondriakova, O. V.; Shishkov, K. Y.; Fil, S. T.; Prokofeva, N. A.; Konoval, M. P.; Simonov, A. A.; Bitieva, A. M.; Trostianetckaia, N. A.; Cholponbaeva, M. B.; Kerimbekova, Z. B.; Duyshobayev, M. Y.; Akunov, A. C.; Kushubakova, N. A.; Melnikov, E. S.; Kim, E. S.; Sherbakov, S. Y.; Trofimov, D. A.; Evdokimov, D. S.; Ayipova, D. A.; Duvanov, I. A.; Abdrahmanova, A. K.; Aimakhanova, G. T.; Ospanova, S. O.; Gaukhar, M. D.; Tursunova, A. T.; Kaskaeva, D. S.; Tulichev, A. A.; Ashina, E. Y.; Kordukova, V. A.; Barisheva, O. Y.; Egorova, K. E.; Varlamova, D. D.; Kuprina, T. V.; Pahomova, E. V.; Kurchugina, N. Y.; Frolova, I. A.; Mazalov, K. V.; Subbotin, A. K.; Kamardina, N. A.; Zarechnova, N. V.; Mamutova, E. M.; Smirnova, L. A.; Klimova, A. V.; Shakhgildyan, L. D.; Tokmin, D. S.; Tupitsin, D. I.; Kriukova, T. V.; Polyakov, D. S.; Karoli, N. A.; Grigorieva, E. V.; Magdeyeva, N. A.; Aparkina, A. V.; Nikitina, N. M.; Petrov, L. D.; Budu, A. M.; Rasulova, Z. D.; Tagayeva, D. R.; Fatenkov, O. V.; Gubareva, E. Y.; Demchenko, A. I.; Klimenko, D. A.; Omarova, Y. V.; Serikbolkyzy, S.; Zheldybayeva, A. E..
Kardiologiia ; 60(11):30-34, 2021.
Article in Russian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1070011

ABSTRACT

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13.
Infection & Chemotherapy ; (2093-2340 (Print))2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-854256

ABSTRACT

Background: From May to July 2015, the Republic of Korea experienced the largest outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outside the Arabian Peninsula. A total of 186 patients, including 36 deaths, had been diagnosed with MERS-coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection as of September 30th, 2015. Materials and Methods: We obtained information of patients who were confirmed to have MERS-CoV infection. MERS-CoV infection was diagnosed using real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay. Results: The median age of the patients was 55 years (range, 16 to 86). A total of 55.4% of the patients had one or more coexisting medical conditions. The most common symptom was fever (95.2%). At admission, leukopenia (42.6%), thrombocytopenia (46.6%), and elevation of aspartate aminotransferase (42.7%) were observed. Pneumonia was detected in 68.3% of patients at admission and developed in 80.8% during the disease course. Antiviral agents were used for 74.7% of patients. Mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and convalescent serum were employed for 24.5%, 7.1%, and 3.8% of patients, respectively. Older age, presence of coexisting medical conditions including diabetes or chronic lung disease, presence of dyspnea, hypotension, and leukocytosis at admission, and the use of mechanical ventilation were revealed to be independent predictors of death. Conclusion: The clinical features of MERS-CoV infection in the Republic of Korea were similar to those of previous outbreaks in the Middle East. However, the overall mortality rate (20.4%) was lower than that in previous reports. Enhanced surveillance and active management of patients during the outbreak may have resulted in improved outcomes. FAU - Choi, Won Suk

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