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1.
Journal of Mens Health ; 18(4):7, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1887428

ABSTRACT

Background: Quarantine, social distancing, and restricted movement and social interaction due to the eoronavinis disease (COVID-19) have been reported reduce physical activity across several countries. However, few studies have evaluated the changes in physical activity patterns before and after COVID-19 among people with disabilities. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate how physical activity participation has changed during COVID-19 among people with disabilities in South Korea. Methods: This study was conducted among 3871 persons with disabilities, aged 10-69 years, who participated in the 2020 Sports Survey for the Disabled conducted by the Korean Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism in March 2020. This survey collected data regarding participants' demographic characteristics (age, gender, etc.) and disability along with the type of physical activity (intensity, frequency, time, etc.), method (facilities, home training, classes/lectures, club), and type (swimming, resistance training, walking and jogging, etc.) of participation in physical activity before and after COVID-19. A chi-squared frequency test was performed to confirm the difference in the ratio of participation frequency, time, intensity, and method and type of physical activity before and after COVID-19. Results: After the COVID-19 outbreak, the frequency, duration, and intensity of physical activity of people with disabilities were reduced compared to before the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, in terms of physical activity participation method, attendance of classes, lectures, and clubs decreased, while physical activity at home increased. In participation types of physical activity, participation in walking and jogging, gymnastics, mountain climbing, and cycling increased, whereas swimming, weight training, and other activities decreased. Conclusion: Public health guidelines and social distancing due to COVID-19 have reduced the frequency, duration, and intensity of physical activity, while changing the types and methods of participation in physical activity for people with disabilities. Therefore, public health support to promote adherence to physical activity should be needed.

2.
Journal of Services Marketing ; : 13, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1886571

ABSTRACT

Purpose The ongoing impact of COVID-19 and the subsequent perception of threat have shifted consumer perceptions and evaluations of service experiences. This paper aims to investigate how customers' service evaluation is shared as customer reviews following the pandemic and the heightened perception of threat. In doing so, this research particularly investigates the shifts in the textual contents of online reviews. Design/methodology/approach This study used the textual contents in the online reviews posted on Hotels.com for 1,497 hotels in New York City for empirical analysis. In total, 109,190 observations were used for the analysis. Findings By analyzing actual online review data from an online review platform for hotel services, this study finds that the text reviews generated after the pandemic outbreak tend to contain words with stronger negative emotions. In terms of the pronoun choice, this study further finds that the use of "I" increases while the use of "we" decreases. Originality/value This research adds to the existing literature on service evaluation and online customer reviews by showing that there are shifts in the expressions used to communicate service evaluation through online text reviews, including the degree of emotionality and pronoun usage. Because potential customers are likely to rely on online reviews for their own decisions, the findings suggest that it is important for practitioners to be aware of such shifts and respond accordingly.

3.
Communication Studies ; 73(3):18, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1886312

ABSTRACT

Exploring social presence could help create socially rich learning experiences in an online learning environment. To better understand social presence in online education, the present study conducted an online survey with 430 undergraduate students in the U.S. during the time of the COVID 19 pandemic in 2020. Results from an EFA (Exploratory Factor Analysis) reveal a five-dimensional measurement of social presence in the online learning context, social richness, copresence, actor within a medium, passive interpersonal, community within a medium. When examining how each dimension plays a role in learning experiences, results from the multiple linear regression analysis of this study suggest that social richness and co-presence are positively associated with cognitive learning, and social richness and co-presence are positively associated with affective learning. Unexpectedly, the data indicate that actor within a medium is negatively associated with cognitive and affective learning experiences. Additionally, social richness and community within a medium are positively associated with motivation to learn. Overall, the study's findings suggest the importance of studying the multidimensional aspects of social presence because each dimension could have different roles in online learning.

4.
Fertility and Sterility ; 116(3 SUPPL):e295, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1880783

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess rates of COVID-19 positivity in a fertility treatment population who continued to seek care throughout the pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective chart review of all patients actively pursuing fertility treatment and had a positive COVID-19 test between March 2020 and February 2021 at a University-affiliated IVF center was performed. Testing was performed on medication start date, and regularly throughout the treatment cycles, approximately once a week. Social distancing, mask use, and temperature and symptomatic screening was implemented early in the process. Rates of infection were calculated by dividing COVID-19 positive patients (whether symptomatic or asymptomatic) by total number of patients in care. This was then multiplied by 100,000, in order to compare our rates to the rate of cases in the state. Information on the general population's COVID-19 positivity rate was obtained from the State Department of Health. RESULTS: Rates of infection in our treatment population varied from 55 in August of 2020 to a high of 2333 per 100,000 in April of 2020. Rates of infection in the general population ranged from 167 per 100,000 to a high of 1367 in Nov of 2020. Our rates of infection did see a trend that was consistent with the curve of infections seen in the general population in the state (Table 1). CONCLUSIONS: Rates of infection were consistently at or below the state's rate per month for much of the 12-month period of study. The exceptions to this included April 2020, where we suspect that patients undergoing treatment were more likely than the general population to receive testing due to the center's testing policies compared to the lack of tests for the general population. Indeed, throughout the studied period, the patients receiving fertility treatment were much more likely than the general population to receive a test, as they were undergoing testing while asymptomatic. Additionally, the rate in February of 2021 was higher than that of the general population. IMPACT STATEMENT: The Covid-19 pandemic was unprecedented in the history of gynecologic endocrinology and infertility, and impacted the ability of patients to access fertility care worldwide. Our findings reveal that with proper mitigation techniques, infertility treatment can be safely delivered even in the face of a pandemic without radically increasing the risk of infection. (Table Presented).

5.
Fertility and Sterility ; 116(3 SUPPL):e233, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1880493

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess if COVID-19 infection differentially impacts first trimester outcomes in patients seeking infertility care at one large fertility practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective chart review of all female patients actively pursuing fertility care in a single fertility center with positive COVID-19 test results from March 2020 to February of 2021 was performed. Positive COVID-19 test results included PCR tests performed in our clinic and symptomatic patients who informed us of their outside positive test results by phone during their treatment with our clinic. This was compared to a control group of all comers in our clinic in 2020. Information was gathered on infertility treatment type, and pregnancy outcomes. Chemical pregnancy rate (CPR) is documented as a positive pregnancy test and ongoing pregnancy was documented as a positive fetal heart beat between 7-8 weeks of gestation and discharge to routine OBGYN care. Fishers exact test was used to calculate p value, statistically significant associations were considered to exist when the p value ≤0.05. RESULTS: A total of 178 cases of COVID-19 were documented in patients between April 2020 and February 2021. After COVID-19 infection (Covid+) sixty-two pregnancies were documented, with sustained implantation in fifty-three (85%) patients. In the subgroup of Covid+ patients that underwent subsequent fertility treatment the CPR was 30.1% with IUI, and 70.1% with IVF and single frozen embryo transfer. This is in comparison to our control population CPR of 14.1 % with IUI (p=0.002) and 68% (p=0.78) with IVF with single embryo transfer (Table 1). Clinical pregnancy loss rate was recorded and shown in Table 1. CONCLUSIONS: In an infertile population, a recent history of COVID-19 diagnosis did not negatively impact pregnancy outcome as measured against a control population. One of the limitations of this study was the relatively small sample size, which may have conflated our data on COVID-19 patients who underwent IUI, whose higher rate of pregnancy is unlikely to be clinically significant. IMPACT STATEMENT: Patients who have had COVID-19 and then proceeded with infertility treatment were no more likely than our control population to have first trimester complications in one fertility clinic. The findings from this study should provide reassurance that attempts at pregnancy do not need to be delayed after recovery from a COVID-19 diagnosis.

6.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 205:2, 2022.
Article in English | English Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1880321
7.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 205:2, 2022.
Article in English | English Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1880320
8.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 205:1, 2022.
Article in English | English Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1880127
9.
Fertility and Sterility ; 116(3 SUPPL):e299, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1880076

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic has created many uncertainties for those pursuing fertility care and assisted reproductive technology (ART) procedures, due to ever-changing healthcare restrictions. There is a lack of research on large-scale data for ART procedures during the pandemic. The objective of our study is to evaluate ART procedures, specifically oocyte retrieval and in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles, prior to and during the pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Claims data from Symphony Health, one of thelargest databases of patient-level data on morethan 280 million patientsin the US, was examined from May 1, 2019 to February 28, 2021. Reproductiveaged women were included in the analysis. March - April 2020 was used as a threshold for when healthcare restrictions became widespread. We compared 10 months prior to the pandemic (May 2019 - Feb 2020) and the same time period after the start of the pandemic (May 2020 - Feb 2021). ART procedures were identified using CPT codes (58970 for oocyte retrieval, and S4011, S4015, and S4016 for IVF) under ICD-10. Data analysis was conducted in Stata, version 16.1, using 2-sided t-tests with significance set at P < 0.05. RESULTS: Our search yielded 39,087 oocyte retrievals and 14,365 IVF cycles. The average age of patients who started an IVF cycle (36±4.2 vs 35±4.4 years) as well as the age of those who had an oocyte retrieval (36.2±4.6 vs 35.3±4.7 years) prior to and during the pandemic was statistically different. Time series plots show that, after a substantial drop in focal variables in March - April 2020, ART procedures quickly recovered to pre-pandemic baseline by June 2020. Afterwards, oocyte retrievals increased from 1,703 per month pre-pandemic to 2,010 per month during the pandemic, and this difference approached significance (P=0.06). There was not a significant difference in IVF cycles (677 per month pre-pandemic vs 686 per month during the pandemic, P=0.88). CONCLUSIONS: Despite concerns regarding suspension of ART and delivery of infertility care during the pandemic, our study shows no significant difference in oocyte retrievals and IVF cycles prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic. IMPACT STATEMENT: These results suggest reassuring outcomes despite a health crisis in the US. There was no significant delay or interruption of fertility care and ART procedures in the US. Further research should examine how other social determinants such as ethnicity, income and geographic location affected access to and utilization of infertility care.

10.
Fertility and Sterility ; 116(3 SUPPL):e213, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1880075

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The delivery of women's healthcare has changed drastically with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. This has undoubtedly created significant uncertainties for those interested in conception counseling. In particular, fertility preservation (FP) is time-sensitive and often emergent or urgent for patients undergoing gonadotoxic therapy. ASRM provided close monitoring and guidelines during this time of crisis. Our objective was to examine the effect of the pandemic on fertility preservation counseling and family planning. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Claims data from Symphony Health, one of the largest databases of patient-level data on more than 280 million patients in the US, was examined from May 1, 2019 to February 28, 2021. Reproductive-aged women were included in the analysis. March - April 2020 was used as a threshold for when healthcare restrictions became widespread. We compared 10 months prior to the pandemic (May 2019 - Feb 2020) and the same time period after the start of the pandemic (May 2020 - Feb 2021). Fertility preservation counseling (Z31.62), FP procedures (Z31.84), and general family planning counseling (Z31.61 and Z31.69) were identified using ICD-10 codes. Data analysis was conducted in Stata, version 16.1, using 2-sided t-tests with significance set at P < 0.05. RESULTS: In our search, 14,491 FP consultations, 15,049 FP procedures, and 359,218 family planning encounters were identified. The mean age of women undergoing FP and family planning counseling decreased significantly when comparing prior to and during the pandemic (31.9±7.6 vs 31.4±7.1 years, and 32.2±6.1 vs 31.6±6 years, respectively). The average age for patients who underwent a FP procedure (33.5±6.5 vs 33±6.4 years) was also statistically different. Time series plot shows a substantial dropin focal variables in March - April 2020. Interestingly, all three variables quickly recovered to prepandemic baseline by June 2020. FP consultations increased from 542 encounters per month pre-pandemic vs 737 per month during the pandemic, P < 0.001. Similarly, FP proceduresincreased from 640 to 781, P=0.02. In contrast, family planning did not change significantly (16,376 vs 17,552, P=0.21). CONCLUSIONS: FP counseling and procedures increased during the pandemic, despite healthcare restrictions and lockdown measures. On the other hand, family planning encounters did not change. Despite barriers to care related to the pandemic, time-sensitive fertility preservation counseling and procedures continued to be utilized. Our findings also reflect ASRM recommendations regarding suspension of non-emergent fertility management at the onset of the pandemic, and continuity of urgent services afterwards. IMPACT STATEMENT: FP counseling and treatment are emergent services that were not negatively impacted by pandemic-related healthcare restrictions. Under ASRM guidelines, FP continued at an increased pace. This experience shows that, under close guidance, emergent or urgent services may be continued during a public health crisis.

11.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(10): 3760-3770, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1876425

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This meta-analysis aims to assess the susceptibility to and clinical outcomes of COVID-19 in autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic disease (AIRD) and following AIRD drug use. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We included observational and case-controlled studies assessing susceptibility and clinical outcomes of COVID-19 in patients with AIRD as well as the clinical outcomes of COVID-19 with or without use of steroids and conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARDs). RESULTS: Meta-analysis including three studies showed that patients with AIRD are not more susceptible to COVID-19 compared to patients without AIRD or the general population (OR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.58 to 2.14). Incidence of severe outcomes of COVID-19 (OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 0.76 to 2.35) and COVID-19 related death (OR: 1.21, 95% CI: 0.68 to 2.16) also did not show significant difference. The clinical outcomes of COVID-19 among AIRD patients with and without csDMARD or steroid showed that both use of steroid (OR: 1.69, 95% CI: 0.96 to 2.98) or csDMARD (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 0.63 to 3.08) had no effect on clinical outcomes of COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: AIRD does not increase susceptibility to COVID-19, not affecting the clinical outcome of COVID-19. Similarly, the use of steroids or csDMARDs for AIRD does not worsen the clinical outcome.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents , Autoimmune Diseases , COVID-19 , Rheumatic Diseases , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Incidence , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Rheumatic Diseases/epidemiology
12.
2022 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1874731

ABSTRACT

Contact tracers assist in containing the spread of highly infectious diseases such as COVID-19 by engaging community members who receive a positive test result in order to identify close contacts. Many contact tracers rely on community member's recall for those identifications, and face limitations such as unreliable memory. To investigate how technology can alleviate this challenge, we developed a visualization tool using de-identified location data sensed from campus WiFi and provided it to contact tracers during mock contact tracing calls. While the visualization allowed contact tracers to find and address inconsistencies due to gaps in community member's memory, it also introduced inconsistencies such as false-positive and false-negative reports due to imperfect data, and information sharing hesitancy. We suggest design implications for technologies that can better highlight and inform contact tracers of potential areas of inconsistencies, and further present discussion on using imperfect data in decision making. © 2022 ACM.

13.
2022 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1874718

ABSTRACT

Recently, chatbots have been deployed in health care in various ways such as providing educational information, and monitoring and triaging symptoms. However, they can be ineffective when they are designed without a careful consideration of the cultural context of the users, especially for marginalized groups. Chatbots designed without cultural understanding may result in loss of trust and disengagement of the user. In this paper, through an interview study, we attempt to understand how chatbots can be better designed for Black American communities within the context of COVID-19. Along with the interviews, we performed design activities with 18 Black Americans that allowed them to envision and design their own chatbot to address their needs and challenges during the pandemic. We report our findings on our participants' needs for chatbots' roles and features, and their challenges in using chatbots. We then present design implications for future chatbot design for the Black American population. © 2022 Owner/Author.

14.
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry ; 2022 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1864404

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to assess internalizing problems before and during the pandemic with data from Dutch consortium Child and adolescent mental health and wellbeing in times of the COVID-19 pandemic, consisting of two Dutch general population samples (GS) and two clinical samples (CS) referred to youth/psychiatric care. Measures of internalizing problems were obtained from ongoing data collections pre-pandemic (NGS = 35,357; NCS = 4487) and twice during the pandemic, in Apr-May 2020 (NGS = 3938; clinical: NCS = 1008) and in Nov-Dec 2020 (NGS = 1489; NCS = 1536), in children and adolescents (8-18 years) with parent (Brief Problem Monitor) and/or child reports (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System®). Results show that, in the general population, internalizing problems were higher during the first peak of the pandemic compared to pre-pandemic based on both child and parent reports. Yet, over the course of the pandemic, on both child and parent reports, similar or lower levels of internalizing problems were observed. Children in the clinical population reported more internalizing symptoms over the course of the pandemic while parents did not report differences in internalizing symptoms from pre-pandemic to the first peak of the pandemic nor over the course of the pandemic. Overall, the findings indicate that children and adolescents of both the general and clinical population were affected negatively by the pandemic in terms of their internalizing problems. Attention is therefore warranted to investigate long-term effects and to monitor if internalizing problems return to pre-pandemic levels or if they remain elevated post-pandemic.

15.
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention ; 31(1):2, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1854514
16.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(9): 3342-3350, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1856620

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) can occur in association with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). It is not easy to differentiate MIS-C from severe COVID-19 or Kawasaki disease based on symptoms. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and laboratory characteristics of MIS-C. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We searched PubMed/Medline for case series and reports of MIS-C published until June 20, 2020. From a total of nine articles involving 45 cases, various clinical and laboratory data were extracted. Each target case was evaluated by using different diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: The average age at onset of MIS-C was 8.6 years. In 80% of cases, the age of patients ranged from 5 to 15 years. Fever (100%) and shock (82%) were the most common presenting symptoms. Sixty percent of cases met the diagnostic criteria for typical or atypical Kawasaki disease. Biomarkers indicative of inflammation, coagulopathy, or cardiac injury were characteristically elevated as follows: ferritin (mean: 1,061 ng/mL), CRP (217 mg/L), ESR (69 mm/hr), IL-6 (214.8 pg/mL), TNFα (63.4 pg/mL), D-dimer (3,220 ng/mL), PT (15.5 s), troponin I (1,006 ng/L), and BNP (12,150 pg/mL). Intravenous immunoglobulin was administered in all target cases, and inotropic agents were commonly used as well. No case of death was observed. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that MIS-C is a serious condition that presents with fever, rash, as well as cardiovascular and gastrointestinal symptoms. Although it is challenging to differentiate MIS-C from Kawasaki disease or severe COVID-19, initiation of appropriate treatments through early diagnosis is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome , Adolescent , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Child, Preschool , Fever/diagnosis , Humans , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/diagnosis , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis
17.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2021 Dec 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1852985

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Following SARS-CoV-2 infection or vaccination there is significant variability between individuals in protective antibody levels against SARS-CoV-2, and within individuals against different virus variants. However, host demographic or clinical characteristics that predict variability in cross-reactive antibody levels are not well-described. These data could inform clinicians, researchers, and policy makers on the populations most likely to require vaccine booster shots. METHODS: In an institutional review board-approved prospective observational cohort study of staff at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, we identified participants with plasma samples collected after SARS-CoV-2 infection, after mRNA vaccination, and after vaccination following infection, and quantitated IgG levels by ELISA to the spike receptor binding domain (RBD) from five important SARS-CoV-2 variants (Wuhan Hu-1, B.1.1.7, B.1.351, P.1 and B.1.617.2). We used regression models to identify factors that contributed to cross-reactive IgG against one or multiple viral variants. RESULTS: Following infection, a minority of the cohort generated cross-reactive antibodies, IgG antibodies that bound all tested variants. Those that did had increased disease severity, poor metabolic health, and were of a particular ancestry. Vaccination increased the levels of cross-reactive IgG levels in all populations including immunocompromised, elderly and persons with poor metabolic health. Younger people with a healthy weight mounted the highest responses. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide important new information on individual antibody responses to infection/vaccination that could inform clinicians on the populations that may require follow-on immunization.

18.
12th International Conference on ICT Convergence (ICTC) - Beyond the Pandemic Era with ICT Convergence Innovation ; : 1703-1706, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1853469

ABSTRACT

In interest of pleasing the needs of customers finding new styles in fashion, we present a novel method that is capable of creating novel plaid and check patterned shirts based on consumer taste integrated with well-known art piece, as well as giving a predicted look of the shirt on the customer. This is done through a combination of three existing deep neural networks [1]-[3]. Since public stores are closing due to the COVID-19, customers are unable to try out apparel before purchasing. Qualitative experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. We believe that our service meets the need of frustrated customers in the pandemic of COVID-19.

19.
12th International Conference on ICT Convergence (ICTC) - Beyond the Pandemic Era with ICT Convergence Innovation ; : 1441-1443, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1853463

ABSTRACT

This study aims to analyze the effects of Covid-19 on the floating population of Seoul, based on population influx/outflux data from January-June, 2019 and January- June, 2020. The datasets are partitioned into their respective administrative districts. Moreover, to understand the effects of Covid-19, the PageRank algorithm is employed to analyze and identify the districts with the most population influx as well as the changes in population movement in Seoul between 2019 to 2020.

20.
12th International Conference on ICT Convergence (ICTC) - Beyond the Pandemic Era with ICT Convergence Innovation ; : 486-489, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1853462

ABSTRACT

This paper proposes virtual reality content for non-face-to-face job education and job experience With the development of digital devices and communication technology, online communities are emerging, and people's lifestyles are also changing. Recently, due to COVID-19, telecommuting and online classes through video conferencing programs have been conducted, and they have also begun to be used for interviews. However, job training and hands-on activities other than classes after employment were mainly conducted offline, and virtual reality content was devised for non-face-to-face job education and job experience First, it was developed for the purpose of job experience, and content was produced under the theme of horticulture artists who are not well recognized as jobs but perform familiar tasks. It was configured similarly to the natural environment with the aim of rapid adaptation of users. In addition, heart rate data through heart rate sensors were used to induce intensive participation in the content of users and to elicit emotional stability.

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