Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 28(3): 756-759, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674279

ABSTRACT

To clarify transmissibility of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 Omicron variant, we determined serial intervals and secondary attack rates among household contacts in South Korea. Mean serial interval for 12 transmission pairs was 2.9 days, and secondary attack rate among 25 households was 50.0%, raising concern about a rapid surge in cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Family Characteristics , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
2.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21568, 2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500503

ABSTRACT

We aimed to investigate the associations of previous influenza/URI with the susceptibility of COVID-19 patients compared to that of non-COVID-19 participants. A nationwide COVID-19 cohort database was collected by the Korea National Health Insurance Corporation. A total of 8,070 COVID-19 patients (1 January 2020 through 4 June 2020) were matched with 32,280 control participants. Severe COVID-19 morbidity was defined based on the treatment histories of the intensive care unit, invasive ventilation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and death. The susceptibility/morbidity/mortality associated with prior histories of 1-14, 1-30, 1-90, 15-45, 15-90, and 31-90 days before COVID-19 onset were analyzed using conditional/unconditional logistic regression. Prior influenza infection was related to increased susceptibility to COVID-19 (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 3.07 [1.61-5.85] for 1-14 days and 1.91 [1.54-2.37] for 1-90 days). Prior URI was also associated with increased susceptibility to COVID-19 (6.95 [6.38-7.58] for 1-14 days, 4.99 [4.64-5.37] for 1-30 days, and 2.70 [2.55-2.86] for 1-90 days). COVID-19 morbidity was positively associated with influenza (3.64 [1.55-9.21] and 3.59 [1.42-9.05]) and URI (1.40 [1.11-1.78] and 1.28 [1.02-1.61]) at 1-14 days and 1-30 days, respectively. Overall, previous influenza/URI did not show an association with COVID-19 mortality. Previous influenza/URI histories were associated with increased COVID-19 susceptibility and morbidity. Our findings indicate why controlling influenza/URI is important during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Cohort Studies , Humans , Middle Aged , Morbidity , Republic of Korea
4.
Front Pharmacol ; 12: 653064, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1245288

ABSTRACT

Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), a member of the Coronaviridae family has become increasingly probelmatic in the pig farming industry. Currently, there are no effective, globally applicable vaccines against PEDV. Here, we tested a recombinant PEDV vaccine candidate based on the expression of the core neutralising epitope (COE) of PEDV conjugated to polymeric immunoglobulin G scaffold (PIGS) in glycoengineered Nicotiana be nthamiana plants. The biological activity of COE-PIGS was demonstrated by binding to C1q component of the complement system, as well as the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in vitro. The recombinant COE-PIGS induced humoral and cellular immune responses specific for PEDV after both systemic and mucosal vaccination. Altogether, the data indicated that PEDV antigen fusion to poly-Fc could be a promising vaccine platform against respiratory PEDV infection.

5.
J Clin Nurs ; 30(13-14): 1990-2000, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146727

ABSTRACT

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to compare anxiety, resilience, and depression between COVID-19 unit (confirmed patients and suspected patients) and non-COVID-19 unit nurses and assess their effects on depression. BACKGROUND: Nurses working during the global pandemic are known to be physically and psychologically exhausted, and experience severe anxiety and depression. However, there is a lack of studies comparing anxiety and depression between COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 unit nurses. DESIGN: Descriptive research study. METHODS: This study was conducted on 64 nurses who directly worked for more than a month in a COVID-19 unit of a general hospital with nationally designated negative-pressure isolation beds and 64 nurses working in a non-COVID-19 unit. Data were collected through questionnaires and were analysed using SPSS 25.0. Reporting of this research adheres to the STROBE guidelines. RESULTS: Anxiety and depression were significantly higher in nurses working with patients suspected to have COVID-19 rather than nurses working with confirmed COVID-19 patients and non-COVID-19 patients. Resilience was significantly lower in suspected patient unit nurses than in COVID-19 unit nurses. Anxiety was the major factor predicting depression in both COVID-19 unit (confirmed patients and suspected patients) and non-COVID-19 unit nurses with 76.6%, 80.7%, and 63.6% explanatory power, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Among nurses working in COVID-19 units, suspected patients unit nurses had higher depression than confirmed patients unit nurses due to an unsafe facility environment, insufficient personal protective equipment, and unknown conditions of the patients. Thus, interventions which have a high impact on depression need to be provided to relieve anxiety. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The nursing organisation must provide comprehensive support including coordinated shifts, internal motivation, incentives, up-to-date information, and clear infection prevention guidelines to relieve anxiety caused by exhaustive workload, uncertainty of infectious diseases, and lack of human and material resources.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Nurses/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Hospitals , Humans
6.
Emerg. infect. dis ; 26(10), 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-706614

ABSTRACT

We analyzed reports for 59,073 contacts of 5,706 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) index patients reported in South Korea during January 20-March 27, 2020. Of 10,592 household contacts, 11.8% had COVID-19. Of 48,481 nonhousehold contacts, 1.9% had COVID-19. Use of personal protective measures and social distancing reduces the likelihood of transmission.

7.
J Korean Med Sci ; 35(31): e288, 2020 Aug 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-704430

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In February 2020, a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak was reported in fitness centers in Cheonan, Korea. METHODS: From February 24 to March 13, an epidemiological investigation was conducted on the fitness center outbreak. All those who were screened were tested for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS CoV-2) using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Contacts were traced and self-isolated for 14 days. We determined the epidemiological characteristics of confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection, and estimated the time-dependent reproduction number to assess the transmission dynamics of the infection. RESULTS: A total of 116 cases were confirmed, and 1,687 contacts were traced. The source cases were 8 Zumba instructors who led aerobics classes in 10 fitness centers, and had the largest average number of contacts. A total of 57 Zumba class participants, 37 of their family members, and 14 other contacts were confirmed as cases. The attack rate was 7.3%. The contacts at Zumba classes and homes had a higher attack rate than other contacts. The mean serial interval (± standard deviation) were estimated to be 5.2 (± 3.8) days. The time-dependent reproduction number was estimated to be 6.1 at the beginning of the outbreak, but it dropped to less than 1, 2 days after the epidemiological investigation was launched. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the COVID-19 outbreak was effectively contained with rigorous contact tracing, isolating, and testing in combination with social distancing without a lock-down.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Contact Tracing , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Fitness Centers , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Quarantine , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 26(8): 1666-1670, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-120058

ABSTRACT

We describe the epidemiology of a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in a call center in South Korea. We obtained information on demographic characteristics by using standardized epidemiologic investigation forms. We performed descriptive analyses and reported the results as frequencies and proportions for categoric variables. Of 1,143 persons who were tested for COVID-19, a total of 97 (8.5%, 95% CI 7.0%-10.3%) had confirmed cases. Of these, 94 were working in an 11th-floor call center with 216 employees, translating to an attack rate of 43.5% (95% CI 36.9%-50.4%). The household secondary attack rate among symptomatic case-patients was 16.2% (95% CI 11.6%- 22.0%). Of the 97 persons with confirmed COVID-19, only 4 (1.9%) remained asymptomatic within 14 days of quarantine, and none of their household contacts acquired secondary infections. Extensive contact tracing, testing all contacts, and early quarantine blocked further transmission and might be effective for containing rapid outbreaks in crowded work settings.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disease Outbreaks , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Call Centers , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Contact Tracing/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Family Characteristics , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Quarantine/methods , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL