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1.
Current Issues in Education ; 24(1), 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20234499

ABSTRACT

Findings in the literature strongly support the importance of family engagement in education. However, effective partnerships between families and schools are rare, especially in ethnically diverse communities where families may lack efficacy or face structural challenges for engagement. Additionally, educator perspectives toward engagement are often framed by White, middle-class paradigms. Educators often fail to acknowledge structural challenges faced by low-income families or the cultural contributions low-income and/or minoritized families can bring. To facilitate engagement between families and schools, a new ECHO® line, TeleNGAGE, was developed at Oklahoma State University, Educational Leadership program. ECHO®, traditionally used in the field of medicine, has utility for professional development for educators because it offers a platform for case-based learning where real problems are addressed in real-time. Additionally, didactic presentations provide professional development for collaborative learning. Through the lens of Communities of Practice (CoP), this qualitative case study explores how relationships between families and schools changed as a result of participation in TeleNGAGE. Tenets of CoP, negotiated meaning, mutual engagement, and a shared repertoire, support a collaborative approach to addressing complex problems. Findings suggest that a CoP has emerged through TeleNGAGE and has resulted in changes in perspectives across families and educational leaders about "what it means to be engaged," enhanced family efficacy for engagement, and changes in engagement practice as family voice has expanded through sharing of concerns/perspectives. These findings have important implications for equitable engagement in a convenient, cost-free environment where educators and families can communicate and develop mutually supportive understandings and practices.

3.
Chest ; 162(2): e77-e80, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1972017

ABSTRACT

CASE PRESENTATION: In July 2020, a previously healthy 6-year-old boy was evaluated in a pulmonary clinic in New York after two episodes of pneumonia in the previous 3 months. For each episode, the patient presented with cough, fever, and hemoptysis, all of which resolved with antibiotic therapy and supportive care. The patient never experienced dyspnea during these episodes of pneumonia. He was asymptomatic at the current visit. The patient had no history of travel, sick contacts, asthma, or bleeding disorders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hemoptysis , Child , Dyspnea , Hemoptysis/diagnosis , Hemoptysis/etiology , Hemoptysis/therapy , Humans , Lung , Male , Pandemics
4.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 552, 2022 Jun 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962758

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Initial reports on US COVID-19 showed different outcomes in different races. In this study we use a diverse large cohort of hospitalized COVID-19 patients to determine predictors of mortality. METHODS: We analyzed data from hospitalized COVID-19 patients (n = 5852) between March 2020- August 2020 from 8 hospitals across the US. Demographics, comorbidities, symptoms and laboratory data were collected. RESULTS: The cohort contained 3,662 (61.7%) African Americans (AA), 286 (5%) American Latinx (LAT), 1,407 (23.9%), European Americans (EA), and 93 (1.5%) American Asians (AS). Survivors and non-survivors mean ages in years were 58 and 68 for AA, 58 and 77 for EA, 44 and 61 for LAT, and 51 and 63 for AS. Mortality rates for AA, LAT, EA and AS were 14.8, 7.3, 16.3 and 2.2%. Mortality increased among patients with the following characteristics: age, male gender, New York region, cardiac disease, COPD, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, history of cancer, immunosuppression, elevated lymphocytes, CRP, ferritin, D-Dimer, creatinine, troponin, and procalcitonin. Use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.001), shortness of breath (SOB) (p < 0.01), fatigue (p = 0.04), diarrhea (p = 0.02), and increased AST (p < 0.01), significantly correlated with death in multivariate analysis. Male sex and EA and AA race/ethnicity had higher frequency of death. Diarrhea was among the most common GI symptom amongst AAs (6.8%). When adjusting for comorbidities, significant variables among the demographics of study population were age (over 45 years old), male sex, EA, and patients hospitalized in New York. When adjusting for disease severity, significant variables were age over 65 years old, male sex, EA as well as having SOB, elevated CRP and D-dimer. Glucocorticoid usage was associated with an increased risk of COVID-19 death in our cohort. CONCLUSION: Among this large cohort of hospitalized COVID-19 patients enriched for African Americans, our study findings may reflect the extent of systemic organ involvement by SARS-CoV-2 and subsequent progression to multi-system organ failure. High mortality in AA in comparison with LAT is likely related to high frequency of comorbidities and older age among AA. Glucocorticoids should be used carefully considering the poor outcomes associated with it. Special focus in treating patients with elevated liver enzymes and other inflammatory biomarkers such as CRP, troponin, ferritin, procalcitonin, and D-dimer are required to prevent poor outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Black or African American , Aged , Biomarkers , Diarrhea , Ferritins , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Procalcitonin , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Troponin
6.
World J Clin Cases ; 9(28): 8374-8387, 2021 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513222

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disproportionately affected African Americans (AA) and Hispanics (HSP). AIM: To analyze the significant effectors of outcome in African American patient population and make special emphasis on gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, laboratory values and comorbidities. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the medical records of 386 COVID-19 positive patients admitted at Howard University Hospital between March and May 2020. We assessed the symptoms, including the GI manifestations, comorbidities, and mortality, using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Of these 386 COVID-19 positive patients, 257 (63.7%) were AAs, 102 (25.3%) HSP, and 26 (6.45%) Whites. There were 257 (63.7%) AA, 102 (25.3%) HSP, 26 (6.45%) Whites. The mean age was 55.6 years (SD = 18.5). However, the mean age of HSP was the lowest (43.7 years vs 61.2 for Whites vs 60 for AAs). The mortality rate was highest among the AAs (20.6%) and lowest among HSP (6.9%). Patients with shortness of breath (SOB) (OR2 = 3.64, CI = 1.73-7.65) and elevated AST (OR2 = 8.01, CI = 3.79-16.9) elevated Procalcitonin (OR2 = 8.27, CI = 3.95-17.3), AST (OR2 = 8.01, CI = 3.79-16.9), ferritin (OR2 = 2.69, CI = 1.24-5.82), and Lymphopenia (OR2 = 2.77, CI = 1.41-5.45) had a high mortality rate. Cough and fever were common but unrelated to the outcome. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus were the most common comorbidities. Glucocorticoid treatment was associated with higher mortality (OR2 = 5.40, CI = 2.72-10.7). Diarrhea was prevalent (18.8%), and GI symptoms did not affect the outcome. CONCLUSION: African Americans in our study had the highest mortality as they consisted of an older population and comorbidities. Age is the most important factor along with SOB in determining the mortality rate. Overall, elevated liver enzymes, ferritin, procalcitonin and C-reactive protein were associated with poor prognosis. GI symptoms did not affect the outcome. Glucocorticoids should be used judiciously, considering the poor outcomes associated with it. Attention should also be paid to monitor liver function during COVID-19, especially in AA and HSP patients with higher disease severity.

8.
Gynecologic Oncology ; 162:S120-S120, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1366725

ABSTRACT

Same-day discharge (SDD) after minimally invasive hysterectomy for benign or malignant gynecologic conditions has been shown to be safe and feasible, but remains challenging to implement. We designed and implemented a quality improvement perioperative program for minimally invasive gynecologic oncology surgery (MIGOS). Our aim was to improve SDD rate from 30% to 75% over the study period, while maintaining acceptable 30-day perioperative outcomes and patient experience. Consecutive patients undergoing minimally invasive hysterectomy at a single cancer centre were included during the 9-month project period and a historical cohort of 100 consecutive patients was identified for comparison. A team of gynecologic oncologists, anesthesiologists, and nurses developed a comprehensive perioperative care program and met bi-weekly to revise interventions through plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycles. Patients were followed for 30 days after discharge. We conducted a descriptive analysis of the characteristics of pre-MIGOS and MIGOS patient cohorts using Wilcoxon rank-sum or Fisher exact tests. We used a run chart to monitor effects of interventions on outcomes and a pre-post analysis to evaluate for statistical significance of change in SDD and perioperative outcomes. We assessed 100 consecutive pre-MIGOS and 79 consecutive MIGOS patients. Overall SDD rates increased from 31% (31/100) to 71% (56/79) after implementation (p<0.001) (Figure 1). There was a consistent increase in SDD rate after implementation, although more pronounced following the start of the COVID pandemic. The MIGOS cohort was significantly younger (59 vs. 65;p=0.04) and had shorter operative times (168 vs. 202 minutes;p<0.001) but the two groups were not different with respect to BMI, comorbidity, stage distribution, type of procedure performed, and intraoperative blood loss. We found no difference in 30-day perioperative complication rates, readmission, reoperation, clinic visits, emergency department visits, mortality or morbidity. The most common reason for overnight admission was nausea and vomiting (35%), complications related to pre-existing comorbidities (15%) and urinary retention (10%). Overall, 89% of MIGOS patients rated their experience as 'very good' or 'excellent', and 87% felt that their post-operative length of stay was adequate. [Display omitted] Following implementation of a perioperative quality improvement program targeted towards minimally invasive gynecologic oncology surgery, a multidisciplinary team significantly improved SDD rates while maintaining low 30-day perioperative complications and excellent patient experience. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Gynecologic Oncology is the property of Academic Press Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

9.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0241956, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-967485

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Healthcare workers face distinct occupational challenges that affect their personal health, especially during a pandemic. In this study we compare the characteristics and outcomes of Covid-19 patients who are and who are not healthcare workers (HCW). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed a cohort of 2,842 adult patients with known HCW status and a positive SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR test presenting to a large academic medical center emergency department (ED) in New York State from March 21 2020 through June 2020. Early in the pandemic we instituted a policy to collect data on patient occupation and exposures to suspected Covid-19. The primary outcome was hospital admission. Secondary outcomes were ICU admission, need for invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), and mortality. We compared baseline characteristics and outcomes of Covid-19 adult patients based on whether they were or were not HCW using univariable and multivariable analyses. RESULTS: Of 2,842 adult patients (mean age 53+/-19 years, 53% male) 193 (6.8%) were HCWs and 2,649 (93.2%) were not HCWs. Compared with non-HCW, HCWs were younger (43 vs 53 years, P<0.001), more likely female (118/193 [61%] vs 1211/2649 [46%], P<0.001), and more likely to have a known Covid-19 exposure (161/193 [83%] vs 946/2649 [36%], P<0.001), but had fewer comorbidities. On presentation to the ED, HCW also had lower frequencies of tachypnea (12/193 [6%] vs 426/2649 [16%], P<0.01), hypoxemia (15/193 [8%] vs 564/2649 [21%], P<0.01), bilateral opacities on imaging (38/193 [20%] vs 1189/2649 [45%], P<0.001), and lymphocytopenia (6/193 [3%] vs 532/2649 [20%], P<0.01) compared to non-HCWs. Direct discharges home from the ED were more frequent in HCW 154/193 (80%) vs 1275/2649 (48%) p<0.001). Hospital admissions (38/193 [20%] vs 1264/2694 [47%], P<0.001), ICU admissions (7/193 [3%] vs 321/2694 [12%], P<0.001), need for IMV (6/193 [3%] vs 321/2694 [12%], P<0.001) and mortality (2/193 [1%] vs 219/2694 [8%], P<0.01) were lower than among non-HCW. After controlling for age, sex, comorbidities, presenting vital signs and radiographic imaging, HCW were less likely to be admitted (OR 0.6, 95%CI 0.3-0.9) than non HCW. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with non HCW, HCW with Covid-19 were younger, had less severe illness, and were less likely to be admitted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Service, Hospital , Health Personnel , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Sex Factors
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