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1.
Sustainability ; 15(8):6428, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2297877

ABSTRACT

The rapid development of information technology and the diffusion of Internet-only banks have made mobile banking an essential service in Korea. Meanwhile, the spread of non-face-to-face services triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic is encouraging continuous innovation in the banking sector. This study explored the application design attributes of mobile banking in the context of the sustainability of Internet-only banks. Specifically, this study empirically analyzed user usage intention and attitude using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and seven service design attributes derived from previous studies, namely: information quality, service quality, utilitarian value, hedonic value, ease of use, usefulness, and aesthetics. Information quality, utilitarian value, ease of use, and usefulness positively affected sustainable usage intention and attitude, while service quality, hedonic value, and aesthetics did not affect sustainable usage intention and attitude. Notably, this study derived the theoretical attributes of financial service design from the user's perspective, which has not yet received much attention in existing research, by applying the TPB. It also identified mobile banking service attributes that may support the sustainability of financial services, which lays a foundation for further research. Moreover, this study's findings offer insights into which user touchpoints designers should focus on when developing services.

3.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(4)2022 Apr 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792376

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) vaccines have a significant impact on reducing morbidity and mortality from infection. However, vaccine hesitancy remains an obstacle in combating the pandemic. The Arab American (AA) population is understudied; thus, we aimed to explore COVID-19 attitudes within this community. (2) Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. An anonymous online survey was distributed to members of different AA associations and to the community through the snowball method. (3) Results: A total of 1746 participants completed the survey. A total of 92% of respondents reported having received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. A total of 73% reported willingness to receive a booster, and 72% plan to give their children the vaccine. On multivariate analysis, respondents were more likely to be vaccine-hesitant if they were hesitant about receiving any vaccine in general. They were less likely to be vaccine-hesitant if they were immigrants, over the age of 40, up to date on their general vaccination and if they believed that COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective in preventing an infection. The belief that all vaccines are effective at preventing diseases was also associated with lower hesitancy. (4) Conclusions: This sample of AAs have higher vaccination rates and are more willing to vaccinate their children against COVID-19 when compared to the rest of the population. However, a reemergence of hesitancy might be arising towards the boosters.

4.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(9)2021 Aug 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374542

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccine hesitancy is the next great barrier for public health. Arab Americans are a rapidly growing demographic in the United States with limited information on the prevalence of vaccine hesitancy. We therefore sought to study the attitudes towards the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine amongst Arab American health professionals living in the United States. METHODS: This was a cross sectional study utilizing an anonymous online survey. The survey was distributed via e-mail to National Arab American Medical Association members and Arab-American Center for Economic and Social Services healthcare employees. Respondents were considered vaccine hesitant if they selected responses other than a willingness to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. RESULTS: A total of 4000 surveys were sent via e-mail from 28 December 2020 to 31 January 2021, and 513 responses were received. The highest group of respondents were between the ages of 18-29 years and physicians constituted 48% of the respondents. On multivariable analysis, we found that respondents who had declined an influenza vaccine in the preceding 5 years (p < 0.001) and allied health professionals (medical assistants, hospital administrators, case managers, researchers, scribes, pharmacists, dieticians and social workers) were more likely to be vaccine hesitant (p = 0.025). In addition, respondents earning over $150,000 US dollars annually were less likely to be vaccine hesitant and this finding was significant on multivariable analysis (p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: Vaccine hesitancy among health care providers could have substantial impact on vaccine attitudes of the general population, and such data may help inform vaccine advocacy efforts.

5.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(5): e2111629, 2021 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1245327

ABSTRACT

Importance: The impact of COVID-19 in the US has been far-reaching and devastating, especially in Black populations. Vaccination is a critical part of controlling community spread, but vaccine acceptance has varied, with some research reporting that Black individuals in the US are less willing to be vaccinated than other racial/ethnic groups. Medical mistrust informed by experiences of racism may be associated with this lower willingness. Objective: To examine the association between race/ethnicity and rejection of COVID-19 vaccine trial participation and vaccine uptake and to investigate whether racial/ethnic group-based medical mistrust is a potential mediator of this association. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional survey study was conducted from June to December 2020 using a convenience sample of 1835 adults aged 18 years or older residing in Michigan. Participants were recruited through community-based organizations and hospital-academic networks. Main Outcomes and Measures: Separate items assessed whether respondents, if asked, would agree to participate in a research study to test a COVID-19 vaccine or to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Participants also completed the suspicion subscale of the Group-Based Medical Mistrust Scale. Results: Of the 1835 participants, 1455 (79%) were women, 361 (20%) men, and 19 (1%) other gender. The mean (SD) age was 49.4 (17.9) years, and 394 participants (21%) identified as Black individuals. Overall, 1376 participants (75%) reported low willingness to participate in vaccine trials, and 945 (52%) reported low willingness to be vaccinated. Black participants reported the highest medical mistrust scores (mean [SD], 2.35 [0.96]) compared with other racial/ethnic groups (mean [SD] for the total sample, 1.83 [0.91]). Analysis of path models revealed significantly greater vaccine trial and vaccine uptake rejection among Black participants (vaccine trial: B [SE], 0.51 [0.08]; vaccine uptake: B [SE], 0.51 [0.08]; both P < .001) compared with the overall mean rejection. The association was partially mediated by medical mistrust among Black participants (vaccine trial: B [SE], 0.04 [0.01]; P = .003; vaccine uptake: B [SE], 0.07 [0.02]; P < .001) and White participants (vaccine trial: B [SE], -0.06 [0.02]; P = .001; vaccine uptake: B [SE], -0.10 [0.02]; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this survey study of US adults, racial/ethnic group-based medical mistrust partially mediated the association between individuals identifying as Black and low rates of acceptance of COVID-19 vaccine trial participation and actual vaccination. The findings suggest that partnerships between health care and other sectors to build trust and promote vaccination may benefit from socially and culturally responsive strategies that acknowledge and address racial/ethnic health care disparities and historical and contemporary experiences of racism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/ethnology , Clinical Trials as Topic/psychology , Racial Groups/psychology , Trust , Vaccination Refusal/ethnology , Adolescent , Adult , Black or African American/psychology , Black or African American/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Asian/psychology , Asian/statistics & numerical data , Attitude to Health/ethnology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hispanic or Latino/psychology , Hispanic or Latino/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Michigan , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/ethnology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Racial Groups/statistics & numerical data , Trust/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , White People/psychology , White People/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
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