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1.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 71(11): 429-436, 2022 Mar 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1744552

ABSTRACT

The B.1.1.529 (Omicron) variant of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, has been the predominant circulating variant in the United States since late December 2021.* Coinciding with increased Omicron circulation, COVID-19-associated hospitalization rates increased rapidly among infants and children aged 0-4 years, a group not yet eligible for vaccination (1). Coronavirus Disease 19-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET)† data were analyzed to describe COVID-19-associated hospitalizations among U.S. infants and children aged 0-4 years since March 2020. During the period of Omicron predominance (December 19, 2021-February 19, 2022), weekly COVID-19-associated hospitalization rates per 100,000 infants and children aged 0-4 years peaked at 14.5 (week ending January 8, 2022); this Omicron-predominant period peak was approximately five times that during the period of SARS-CoV-2 B.1.617.2 (Delta) predominance (June 27-December 18, 2021, which peaked the week ending September 11, 2021).§ During Omicron predominance, 63% of hospitalized infants and children had no underlying medical conditions; infants aged <6 months accounted for 44% of hospitalizations, although no differences were observed in indicators of severity by age. Strategies to prevent COVID-19 among infants and young children are important and include vaccination among currently eligible populations (2) such as pregnant women (3), family members, and caregivers of infants and young children (4).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Population Surveillance/methods , United States
2.
Ann Intern Med ; 174(10): 1409-1419, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515633

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused substantial morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: To describe monthly clinical trends among adults hospitalized with COVID-19. DESIGN: Pooled cross-sectional study. SETTING: 99 counties in 14 states participating in the Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET). PATIENTS: U.S. adults (aged ≥18 years) hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 during 1 March to 31 December 2020. MEASUREMENTS: Monthly hospitalizations, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, and in-hospital death rates per 100 000 persons in the population; monthly trends in weighted percentages of interventions, including ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and vasopressor use, among an age- and site-stratified random sample of hospitalized case patients. RESULTS: Among 116 743 hospitalized adults with COVID-19, the median age was 62 years, 50.7% were male, and 40.8% were non-Hispanic White. Monthly rates of hospitalization (105.3 per 100 000 persons), ICU admission (20.2 per 100 000 persons), and death (11.7 per 100 000 persons) peaked during December 2020. Rates of all 3 outcomes were highest among adults aged 65 years or older, males, and Hispanic or non-Hispanic Black persons. Among 18 508 sampled hospitalized adults, use of remdesivir and systemic corticosteroids increased from 1.7% and 18.9%, respectively, in March to 53.8% and 74.2%, respectively, in December. Frequency of ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and vasopressor use decreased from March (37.8%, 27.8%, and 22.7%, respectively) to December (20.5%, 12.3%, and 12.8%, respectively); use of noninvasive respiratory support increased from March to December. LIMITATION: COVID-NET covers approximately 10% of the U.S. population; findings may not be generalizable to the entire country. CONCLUSION: Rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalization, ICU admission, and death were highest in December 2020, corresponding with the third peak of the U.S. pandemic. The frequency of intensive interventions for management of hospitalized patients decreased over time. These data provide a longitudinal assessment of clinical trends among adults hospitalized with COVID-19 before widespread implementation of COVID-19 vaccines. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Hospitalization/trends , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Care/trends , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units/trends , Length of Stay/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Respiration, Artificial/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use , Young Adult
3.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(36): 1255-1260, 2021 Sep 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441397

ABSTRACT

Although COVID-19-associated hospitalizations and deaths have occurred more frequently in adults,† COVID-19 can also lead to severe outcomes in children and adolescents (1,2). Schools are opening for in-person learning, and many prekindergarten children are returning to early care and education programs during a time when the number of COVID-19 cases caused by the highly transmissible B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is increasing.§ Therefore, it is important to monitor indicators of severe COVID-19 among children and adolescents. This analysis uses Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET)¶ data to describe COVID-19-associated hospitalizations among U.S. children and adolescents aged 0-17 years. During March 1, 2020-August 14, 2021, the cumulative incidence of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations was 49.7 per 100,000 children and adolescents. The weekly COVID-19-associated hospitalization rate per 100,000 children and adolescents during the week ending August 14, 2021 (1.4) was nearly five times the rate during the week ending June 26, 2021 (0.3); among children aged 0-4 years, the weekly hospitalization rate during the week ending August 14, 2021, was nearly 10 times that during the week ending June 26, 2021.** During June 20-July 31, 2021, the hospitalization rate among unvaccinated adolescents (aged 12-17 years) was 10.1 times higher than that among fully vaccinated adolescents. Among all hospitalized children and adolescents with COVID-19, the proportions with indicators of severe disease (such as intensive care unit [ICU] admission) after the Delta variant became predominant (June 20-July 31, 2021) were similar to those earlier in the pandemic (March 1, 2020-June 19, 2021). Implementation of preventive measures to reduce transmission and severe outcomes in children is critical, including vaccination of eligible persons, universal mask wearing in schools, recommended mask wearing by persons aged ≥2 years in other indoor public spaces and child care centers,†† and quarantining as recommended after exposure to persons with COVID-19.§§.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/trends , Adolescent , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
4.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257622, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438350

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Some studies suggested more COVID-19-associated hospitalizations among racial and ethnic minorities. To inform public health practice, the COVID-19-associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) quantified associations between race/ethnicity, census tract socioeconomic indicators, and COVID-19-associated hospitalization rates. METHODS: Using data from COVID-NET population-based surveillance reported during March 1-April 30, 2020 along with socioeconomic and denominator data from the US Census Bureau, we calculated COVID-19-associated hospitalization rates by racial/ethnic and census tract-level socioeconomic strata. RESULTS: Among 16,000 COVID-19-associated hospitalizations, 34.8% occurred among non-Hispanic White (White) persons, 36.3% among non-Hispanic Black (Black) persons, and 18.2% among Hispanic or Latino (Hispanic) persons. Age-adjusted COVID-19-associated hospitalization rate were 151.6 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 147.1-156.1) in census tracts with >15.2%-83.2% of persons living below the federal poverty level (high-poverty census tracts) and 75.5 (95% CI: 72.9-78.1) in census tracts with 0%-4.9% of persons living below the federal poverty level (low-poverty census tracts). Among White, Black, and Hispanic persons living in high-poverty census tracts, age-adjusted hospitalization rates were 120.3 (95% CI: 112.3-128.2), 252.2 (95% CI: 241.4-263.0), and 341.1 (95% CI: 317.3-365.0), respectively, compared with 58.2 (95% CI: 55.4-61.1), 304.0 (95%: 282.4-325.6), and 540.3 (95% CI: 477.0-603.6), respectively, in low-poverty census tracts. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, COVID-19-associated hospitalization rates were highest in high-poverty census tracts, but rates among Black and Hispanic persons were high regardless of poverty level. Public health practitioners must ensure mitigation measures and vaccination campaigns address needs of racial/ethnic minority groups and people living in high-poverty census tracts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Status Disparities , Hospitalization , Minority Groups , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States/epidemiology
5.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(32): 1088-1093, 2021 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355299

ABSTRACT

Clinical trials of COVID-19 vaccines currently authorized for emergency use in the United States (Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and Janssen [Johnson & Johnson]) indicate that these vaccines have high efficacy against symptomatic disease, including moderate to severe illness (1-3). In addition to clinical trials, real-world assessments of COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness are critical in guiding vaccine policy and building vaccine confidence, particularly among populations at higher risk for more severe illness from COVID-19, including older adults. To determine the real-world effectiveness of the three currently authorized COVID-19 vaccines among persons aged ≥65 years during February 1-April 30, 2021, data on 7,280 patients from the COVID-19-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) were analyzed with vaccination coverage data from state immunization information systems (IISs) for the COVID-NET catchment area (approximately 4.8 million persons). Among adults aged 65-74 years, effectiveness of full vaccination in preventing COVID-19-associated hospitalization was 96% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 94%-98%) for Pfizer-BioNTech, 96% (95% CI = 95%-98%) for Moderna, and 84% (95% CI = 64%-93%) for Janssen vaccine products. Effectiveness of full vaccination in preventing COVID-19-associated hospitalization among adults aged ≥75 years was 91% (95% CI = 87%-94%) for Pfizer-BioNTech, 96% (95% CI = 93%-98%) for Moderna, and 85% (95% CI = 72%-92%) for Janssen vaccine products. COVID-19 vaccines currently authorized in the United States are highly effective in preventing COVID-19-associated hospitalizations in older adults. In light of real-world data demonstrating high effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines among older adults, efforts to increase vaccination coverage in this age group are critical to reducing the risk for COVID-19-related hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Vaccines, Synthetic
6.
Clin Infect Dis ; 72(11): e695-e703, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249282

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Data on risk factors for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-associated hospitalization are needed to guide prevention efforts and clinical care. We sought to identify factors independently associated with COVID-19-associated hospitalizations. METHODS: Community-dwelling adults (aged ≥18 years) in the United States hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 during 1 March-23 June 2020 were identified from the COVID-19-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET), a multistate surveillance system. To calculate hospitalization rates by age, sex, and race/ethnicity strata, COVID-NET data served as the numerator and Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System estimates served as the population denominator for characteristics of interest. Underlying medical conditions examined included hypertension, coronary artery disease, history of stroke, diabetes, obesity, severe obesity, chronic kidney disease, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Generalized Poisson regression models were used to calculate adjusted rate ratios (aRRs) for hospitalization. RESULTS: Among 5416 adults, hospitalization rates (all reported as aRR [95% confidence interval]) were higher among those with ≥3 underlying conditions (vs without) (5.0 [3.9-6.3]), severe obesity (4.4 [3.4-5.7]), chronic kidney disease (4.0 [3.0-5.2]), diabetes (3.2 [2.5-4.1]), obesity (2.9 [2.3-3.5]), hypertension (2.8 [2.3-3.4]), and asthma (1.4 [1.1-1.7]), after adjusting for age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Adjusting for the presence of an individual underlying medical condition, higher hospitalization rates were observed for adults aged ≥65 or 45-64 years (vs 18-44 years), males (vs females), and non-Hispanic black and other race/ethnicities (vs non-Hispanic whites). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings elucidate groups with higher hospitalization risk that may benefit from targeted preventive and therapeutic interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
7.
Cancer Nurs ; 45(2): E628-E638, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1114920

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The worldwide spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has impacted the treatment of cancer patients. Treatment changes can negatively affect patients' prognosis and may be psychologically burdensome. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore whether COVID-19-related treatment changes (delays, cancellations, changes) influenced fear of cancer recurrence, anxiety, and depression in breast cancer patients. METHODS: A convenience sample (n = 154) of patients who were diagnosed with breast cancer no longer than 2 years ago was obtained from an online community and social network site. The survey content included COVID-19-related treatment experiences and psychological status. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, χ2 test, independent t test, and analysis of variance. RESULTS: Twenty-nine patients (18.8%) had experienced COVID-19-related treatment changes, and changes of the treatment plan had a significant correlation with depression (t = 2.000, P = .047). Fear of cancer recurrence was high (mean score, 84.31 ± 24.23). Fifteen percent had moderate to severe levels of anxiety, and 24.7% had moderate to severe levels of depression. Narrative reports also identified COVID-19-related unforeseen costs. CONCLUSION: In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, breast cancer patients experienced treatment changes, and changes in treatment plans were significantly associated with depression. Fear of recurrence, anxiety, and depression were found at high levels. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Oncology nurses should assess the psychological status of cancer patients in the early survivorship phase who appear to be especially vulnerable during the COVID-19 pandemic. Oncology nurses can also monitor whether patients are receiving timely supportive care to alleviate fears and anxiety and assess financial needs for COVID-19-related costs.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Anxiety/psychology , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Depression/psychology , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Clin Infect Dis ; 72(5): e162-e166, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1114842

ABSTRACT

Among 513 adults aged 18-49 years without underlying medical conditions hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) during March 2020-August 2020, 22% were admitted to an intensive care unit, 10% required mechanical ventilation, and 3 patients died (0.6%). These data demonstrate that healthy younger adults can develop severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Laboratories , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
9.
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report ; 69(38):1347-1354, 2020.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1085787

ABSTRACT

Surveillance of pregnant women with COVID-19, including those with asymptomatic infections, is important to understand the short- and long-term consequences of COVID-19 for mothers and newborns. In this study, residents of the predefined surveillance catchment area who had a positive molecular test for SARS-CoV-2 during hospitalization or up to 14 days before hospital admission were classified as having a COVID-19-associated hospitalization and were included in COVID-NET surveillance. Thirteen states (California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee and Utah) contributed data to this report. One in four women aged 15-49 years who had a COVID-19-associated hospitalization during March 1-August 22, 2020 was pregnant, based on a convenience sample from COVID-NET. Among 598 hospitalized pregnant women with COVID-19, 55% were asymptomatic at admission. Severe illness occurred among symptomatic pregnant women, including intensive care unit admissions (16%), mechanical ventilation (8%) and death (1%). Pregnancy losses occurred for 2% of pregnancies completed during COVID-19-associated hospitalizations and were experienced by both symptomatic and asymptomatic women. Pregnant women and health care providers should be aware of potential risks for severe COVID-19, including adverse pregnancy outcomes.

10.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 7(11): ofaa528, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-960576

ABSTRACT

Using a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-associated hospitalization surveillance network, we found that 42.5% of hospitalized COVID-19 cases with available data from March 1-June 30, 2020, received ≥1 COVID-19 investigational treatment. Hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin, and remdesivir were used frequently; however, hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin use declined over time, while use of remdesivir increased.

11.
Clin Infect Dis ; 72(5): e162-e166, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-955785

ABSTRACT

Among 513 adults aged 18-49 years without underlying medical conditions hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) during March 2020-August 2020, 22% were admitted to an intensive care unit, 10% required mechanical ventilation, and 3 patients died (0.6%). These data demonstrate that healthy younger adults can develop severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Laboratories , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
12.
Health Equity ; 4(1): 500-504, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-949513

ABSTRACT

Latinos have been affected at higher rates in California. These include undocumented immigrants who are the largest group of Californians that remains uninsured. This population has limited access to health care services and coverage options. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has shown that undocumented immigrants are particularly vulnerable during this outbreak as they are more likely to delay seeking medical care and lack a regular source of care. In addition, many work in essential services, have low or moderate incomes, and live in overcrowded conditions increasing their risk for exposure to COVID-19. To reduce the state's COVID-19 burden, California should expand comprehensive Medi-Cal to all eligible individuals regardless of immigration status.

13.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(43): 1576-1583, 2020 Oct 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895763

ABSTRACT

Health care personnel (HCP) can be exposed to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), both within and outside the workplace, increasing their risk for infection. Among 6,760 adults hospitalized during March 1-May 31, 2020, for whom HCP status was determined by the COVID-19-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET), 5.9% were HCP. Nursing-related occupations (36.3%) represented the largest proportion of HCP hospitalized with COVID-19. Median age of hospitalized HCP was 49 years, and 89.8% had at least one underlying medical condition, of which obesity was most commonly reported (72.5%). A substantial proportion of HCP with COVID-19 had indicators of severe disease: 27.5% were admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), 15.8% required invasive mechanical ventilation, and 4.2% died during hospitalization. HCP can have severe COVID-19-associated illness, highlighting the need for continued infection prevention and control in health care settings as well as community mitigation efforts to reduce transmission.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
14.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(38): 1347-1354, 2020 Sep 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-791874

ABSTRACT

Pregnant women might be at increased risk for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) (1,2). The COVID-19-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) (3) collects data on hospitalized pregnant women with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19; to date, such data have been limited. During March 1-August 22, 2020, approximately one in four hospitalized women aged 15-49 years with COVID-19 was pregnant. Among 598 hospitalized pregnant women with COVID-19, 54.5% were asymptomatic at admission. Among 272 pregnant women with COVID-19 who were symptomatic at hospital admission, 16.2% were admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), and 8.5% required invasive mechanical ventilation. During COVID-19-associated hospitalizations, 448 of 458 (97.8%) completed pregnancies resulted in a live birth and 10 (2.2%) resulted in a pregnancy loss. Testing policies based on the presence of symptoms might miss COVID-19 infections during pregnancy. Surveillance of pregnant women with COVID-19, including those with asymptomatic infections, is important to understand the short- and long-term consequences of COVID-19 for mothers and newborns. Identifying COVID-19 in women during birth hospitalizations is important to guide preventive measures to protect pregnant women, parents, newborns, other patients, and hospital personnel. Pregnant women and health care providers should be made aware of the potential risks for severe COVID-19 illness, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and ways to prevent infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Asymptomatic Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Laboratories, Hospital , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
15.
Sci. Ed. ; 2(7): 111-117, 2020.
Article in English | WHO COVID, ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-749240

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study examined changes in Asian journal editors' daily life and work during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and investigated their opinions on expected changes, thereby providing preliminary data to support the future needs of journal editors. Methods: A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to 1,537 editors and staff of Asian scientific journals from July 13 to 19, 2020. The items gathered information on participants' general characteristics, changes in daily life, changes in work life, anticipated future changes, and suggestions in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Results: Of the 152 respondents (response rate, 9.7%), most were editors. Fifty-seven respondents (37.5%) felt very or extremely anxious about the COVID-19 pandemic, and 101 (68.4%) reported spending more time on the internet. The workload of editing, reviewing, and publishing had increased for about one-third of respondents (34.2%, n=52). Forty-four respondents (28.9%) said that the number of submissions had increased. Of the 68 editors who had received manuscripts on COVID-19, 30 (44.1%) prioritized them. Most respondents (73.7%, n=112) predicted that online-only journal publishing would expand after the COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusion: COVID-19 appears to be a source of anxiety to editors, which may be related to the increased time they spend on the internet. Some editors reported an increased workload. To promote online communication, a better environment and training tools are required. Editors and staff will need more opportunities to prepare for online publishing, as editors believed that the online-only publication of scholarly journals would accelerate after the COVID-19 pandemic.

16.
J Clin Nurs ; 2020 Aug 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-710906

ABSTRACT

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to examine the lived experience of physicians and nurses who underwent hospitalised isolation during the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus outbreak that hit Korea in 2015, and how it may have affected their professional self-image. BACKGROUND: Health professionals caring for patients during infectious outbreaks such as the Middle East respiratory syndrome have reported negative psychological effects. However, little is known about how the experience influences their professional self-image. DESIGN: An interpretive phenomenological approach was applied using individual in-depth interviews. METHODS: Through purposeful and snowball sampling, 11 health professionals who had experienced hospital isolation due to suspicious symptoms of Middle East respiratory syndrome during the outbreak, participated in face-to-face interviews (50-90 min). We adhered to the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research guideline for reporting. RESULTS: Six themes were identified: (a) engulfed in chaos and exhaustion; (b) feeling hurt and constrained by the rejection and blame; (c) anxiety induced by the enclosed environment; (d) dread of this uncertain and critical disease; (e) sustained by family and colleagues; and (f) reflection at this turning point, expanding self-understanding and seeking a balance. CONCLUSION: Hospitalised isolation was a "turning point" that appeared to change health professionals' sense of identity and direction. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Preparedness for infectious epidemics should ensure tangible assistance, protection, and clear communication with health professionals, with careful attention to their psychological needs and affirmation of their self-image in the aftermath.

17.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(32): 1081-1088, 2020 Aug 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696036

ABSTRACT

Most reported cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in children aged <18 years appear to be asymptomatic or mild (1). Less is known about severe COVID-19 illness requiring hospitalization in children. During March 1-July 25, 2020, 576 pediatric COVID-19 cases were reported to the COVID-19-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET), a population-based surveillance system that collects data on laboratory-confirmed COVID-19-associated hospitalizations in 14 states (2,3). Based on these data, the cumulative COVID-19-associated hospitalization rate among children aged <18 years during March 1-July 25, 2020, was 8.0 per 100,000 population, with the highest rate among children aged <2 years (24.8). During March 21-July 25, weekly hospitalization rates steadily increased among children (from 0.1 to 0.4 per 100,000, with a weekly high of 0.7 per 100,000). Overall, Hispanic or Latino (Hispanic) and non-Hispanic black (black) children had higher cumulative rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations (16.4 and 10.5 per 100,000, respectively) than did non-Hispanic white (white) children (2.1). Among 208 (36.1%) hospitalized children with complete medical chart reviews, 69 (33.2%) were admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU); 12 of 207 (5.8%) required invasive mechanical ventilation, and one patient died during hospitalization. Although the cumulative rate of pediatric COVID-19-associated hospitalization remains low (8.0 per 100,000 population) compared with that among adults (164.5),* weekly rates increased during the surveillance period, and one in three hospitalized children were admitted to the ICU, similar to the proportion among adults. Continued tracking of SARS-CoV-2 infections among children is important to characterize morbidity and mortality. Reinforcement of prevention efforts is essential in congregate settings that serve children, including childcare centers and schools.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adolescent , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Chronic Disease , Clinical Laboratory Services , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pandemics , Pediatric Obesity/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , United States/epidemiology
18.
Clin Infect Dis ; 72(9): e206-e214, 2021 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-649371

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Currently, the United States has the largest number of reported coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases and deaths globally. Using a geographically diverse surveillance network, we describe risk factors for severe outcomes among adults hospitalized with COVID-19. METHODS: We analyzed data from 2491 adults hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 between 1 March-2 May 2020, as identified through the Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network, which comprises 154 acute-care hospitals in 74 counties in 13 states. We used multivariable analyses to assess associations between age, sex, race and ethnicity, and underlying conditions with intensive care unit (ICU) admission and in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: The data show that 92% of patients had ≥1 underlying condition; 32% required ICU admission; 19% required invasive mechanical ventilation; and 17% died. Independent factors associated with ICU admission included ages 50-64, 65-74, 75-84, and ≥85 years versus 18-39 years (adjusted risk ratios [aRRs], 1.53, 1.65, 1.84, and 1.43, respectively); male sex (aRR, 1.34); obesity (aRR, 1.31); immunosuppression (aRR, 1.29); and diabetes (aRR, 1.13). Independent factors associated with in-hospital mortality included ages 50-64, 65-74, 75-84, and ≥ 85 years versus 18-39 years (aRRs, 3.11, 5.77, 7.67, and 10.98, respectively); male sex (aRR, 1.30); immunosuppression (aRR, 1.39); renal disease (aRR, 1.33); chronic lung disease (aRR 1.31); cardiovascular disease (aRR, 1.28); neurologic disorders (aRR, 1.25); and diabetes (aRR, 1.19). CONCLUSIONS: In-hospital mortality increased markedly with increasing age. Aggressive implementation of prevention strategies, including social distancing and rigorous hand hygiene, may benefit the population as a whole, as well as those at highest risk for COVID-19-related complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
19.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(15): 458-464, 2020 04 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-42192

ABSTRACT

Since SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), was first detected in December 2019 (1), approximately 1.3 million cases have been reported worldwide (2), including approximately 330,000 in the United States (3). To conduct population-based surveillance for laboratory-confirmed COVID-19-associated hospitalizations in the United States, the COVID-19-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) was created using the existing infrastructure of the Influenza Hospitalization Surveillance Network (FluSurv-NET) (4) and the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Hospitalization Surveillance Network (RSV-NET). This report presents age-stratified COVID-19-associated hospitalization rates for patients admitted during March 1-28, 2020, and clinical data on patients admitted during March 1-30, 2020, the first month of U.S. surveillance. Among 1,482 patients hospitalized with COVID-19, 74.5% were aged ≥50 years, and 54.4% were male. The hospitalization rate among patients identified through COVID-NET during this 4-week period was 4.6 per 100,000 population. Rates were highest (13.8) among adults aged ≥65 years. Among 178 (12%) adult patients with data on underlying conditions as of March 30, 2020, 89.3% had one or more underlying conditions; the most common were hypertension (49.7%), obesity (48.3%), chronic lung disease (34.6%), diabetes mellitus (28.3%), and cardiovascular disease (27.8%). These findings suggest that older adults have elevated rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalization and the majority of persons hospitalized with COVID-19 have underlying medical conditions. These findings underscore the importance of preventive measures (e.g., social distancing, respiratory hygiene, and wearing face coverings in public settings where social distancing measures are difficult to maintain)† to protect older adults and persons with underlying medical conditions, as well as the general public. In addition, older adults and persons with serious underlying medical conditions should avoid contact with persons who are ill and immediately contact their health care provider(s) if they have symptoms consistent with COVID-19 (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html) (5). Ongoing monitoring of hospitalization rates, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of hospitalized patients will be important to better understand the evolving epidemiology of COVID-19 in the United States and the clinical spectrum of disease, and to help guide planning and prioritization of health care system resources.

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