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1.
Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics ; 26(3):390-408, 2023.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-20237923

ABSTRACT

Opportunities to participate in physical activities (PA) and fitness exercises in public and private facilities have been reduced or banned due to social distancing regulations during the height of the global pandemic. Though Korea has not experienced lockdown, several venues have been restricted to prevent the spread of Covid-19. Despite the limitations of PA engagement, people have found alternative activities by using online platforms to keep active and fit. Thus, this study focuses on analyzing fitness-related video titles from YouTube. By collecting data through text mining and conducting network analysis, it provides basic knowledge of the fitness trends from pre- and post-Covid-19. As a result, 'exercise' was found to have the highest tendency and had strong connections to keywords that indicated specific methods of working out to become fit, but it also had connections to trendy keywords such as 'hip-up' and 'body-profile' which reflect the fitness culture in Korea.

2.
Sport in Society ; 26(3):390-408, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2316079

ABSTRACT

Opportunities to participate in physical activities (PA) and fitness exercises in public and private facilities have been reduced or banned due to social distancing regulations during the height of the global pandemic. Though Korea has not experienced lockdown, several venues have been restricted to prevent the spread of Covid-19. Despite the limitations of PA engagement, people have found alternative activities by using online platforms to keep active and fit. Thus, this study focuses on analyzing fitness-related video titles from YouTube. By collecting data through text mining and conducting network analysis, it provides basic knowledge of the fitness trends from pre- and post-Covid-19. As a result, ‘exercise' was found to have the highest tendency and had strong connections to keywords that indicated specific methods of working out to become fit, but it also had connections to trendy keywords such as ‘hip-up' and ‘body-profile' which reflect the fitness culture in Korea.

3.
Sport in Society ; : 1-19, 2022.
Article in English | Taylor & Francis | ID: covidwho-2070030
4.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(5): 1096-1104, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784697

ABSTRACT

AIM: To analyse the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and examine its related factors among nurses who worked during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in Daegu, South Korea. BACKGROUND: Nurses are a high-risk population for PTSD, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study was conducted to identify the nursing work environmental factors that should be addressed to reduce PTSD. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional design, 365 nurses were enrolled. Their characteristics (intrapersonal, interpersonal, organizational, and COVID-19-related) and PTSD Checklist-5 scores were analysed. RESULTS: The average PTSD score was 14.98 ± 15.94, and 16.5% of the participants had a high risk of PTSD. Nurses were more likely to have PTSD if they were married (odds ratio = 3.02, p = .013) and when nurse managers' abilities, leadership, and support of nurses were low (odds ratio = 3.81, p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The nursing work environment was found to be associated with PTSD. Therefore, interventions are necessary to increase nurse managers' abilities, leadership, and support for nurses to reduce the risk of PTSD among nurses. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Effective professional and social support and interventions to improve nurse managers' abilities, leadership, and support of nurses are needed to reduce PTSD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurse Administrators , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology
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