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1.
J Clin Med ; 11(11)2022 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869672

ABSTRACT

While the relative efficacy of remdesivir as a therapeutic agent in selected patients with COVID-19 has been established, safety concerns have been raised regarding potential nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. Our main objective was to investigate the kidney- and liver-related safety outcomes in patients with COVID-19 treated with remdesivir in a public hospital in New York. A propensity score-matched retrospective study was conducted in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 from 1 June 2020 to 10 March 2021. A total of 927 patients were included in this study (remdesivir: 427, non-remdesivir: 500; women: 51.8%; median age 61 years; median BMI: 28.5 kg/m2). Matching without replacement yielded a cohort of 248 patients (124 in each group). In the matched cohort, the remdesivir group had a significantly lower rate of acute kidney injury (AKI) (12.1% vs. 21.8%, p = 0.042), a lower rate of acute liver injury (ALI) on the verge of statistical significance (7.3% vs. 14.5%, p = 0.067), and non-significantly lower death rate (13.7% vs. 16.1%, p = 0.593) compared to the non-remdesivir group. Multivariable analyses revealed that patients treated with remdesivir were found to be associated with a significantly lower likelihood for AKI (OR: 0.40; 95% CI: 0.24-0.67, p < 0.001), no association was found for ALI (OR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.35-1.30, p = 0.241), while a trend towards an association of patients treated with remdesivir with a lower likelihood for in-hospital death was observed (OR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.32-1.01, p = 0.053). In conclusion, no safety concerns with regards to renal and liver outcomes were raised in patients with COVID-19 treated with remdesivir. Instead, there were signals of possible nephroprotection and improved in-hospital mortality.

2.
J Clin Med ; 11(3)2022 Jan 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650049

ABSTRACT

Severe obesity increases the risk for negative outcomes in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Our objectives were to investigate the effect of BMI on in-hospital outcomes in our New York City Health and Hospitals' ethnically diverse population, further explore this effect by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and timing of admission, and, given the relationship between COVID-19 and hyperinflammation, assess the concentrations of markers of systemic inflammation in different BMI groups. A retrospective study was conducted in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in the public health care system of New York City from 1 March 2020 to 31 October 2020. A total of 8833 patients were included in this analysis (women: 3593, median age: 62 years). The median body mass index (BMI) was 27.9 kg/m2. Both overweight and obesity were independently associated with in-hospital death. The association of overweight and obesity with death appeared to be stronger in men, younger patients, and individuals of Hispanic ethnicity. We did not observe higher concentrations of inflammatory markers in patients with obesity as compared to those without obesity. In conclusion, overweight and obesity were independently associated with in-hospital death. Obesity was not associated with higher concentrations of inflammatory markers.

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