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1.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-314013

ABSTRACT

Background: Enhanced coagulation in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients is considered a major obstacle for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), but systematic analyses are sparse. We compared filter survival and citrate-induced complications during CRRT with regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) in COVID-19 and Non-COVID-19 patients. Methods: : In this retrospective study we included all consecutive adult patients (n=97) with acute kidney injury (AKI) treated with RCA-CRRT at seven ICUs of a tertiary university hospital over the tree month period. Medical data were collected to compare the efficacy and complications of RCA-CRRT between COVID-19 (n=44) and Non-COVID-19 patients (n=53). Results: : There was no significant difference in the number of CRRT filters used per patient in COVID-19 vs. Non-COVID-19 patients (median 5 vs 3 filters, p=0.103). Mean filter run-time was significantly higher in COVID-19 patients compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (68.4 (95%CI 67.0-69.9) vs. 65.2 (95%CI 63.2-67.2) hours, respectively;log-rank 0.014). COVID-19 patients showed significantly higher activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) throughout the CRRT due to systemic anticoagulation compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (54 (IQR 45 – 61) vs. 47 (IQR 41 - 58) seconds, respectively;p<0.001). A significantly higher incidence of combined metabolic disturbances (metabolic alkalosis, hypercalcemia and hypernatremia), consistent with reduced filter patency and citrate overload during RCA, was observed in COVID-19 patients compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (19.1% vs. 12.7%, respectively;p=0.04). These metabolic disarrangements were resistant to per-protocol adjustments and disappeared after replacement of the CRRT-filter. Conclusions: : In contrast to initial concerns, adequate filter life-span can be achieved with RCA during CRRT in COVID-19 patients. However, close monitoring of the acid-base balance appears warranted, as these patients tend to develop reduced filter patency leading to a higher incidence of citrate overload and metabolic disturbances. Trial Registration (local authority): EA1/285/20 (Ethikkommission der Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin);date of registration 08.10.2020.

2.
J Crit Care ; 67: 126-131, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509976

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We compared filter survival and citrate-induced complications during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) with regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) in COVID-19 and Non-COVID-19 patients. METHODS: In this retrospective study we included all consecutive adult patients (n = 97) treated with RCA-CRRT. Efficacy and complications of RCA-CRRT were compared between COVID-19 and Non-COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: Mean filter run-time was significantly higher in COVID-19 patients compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (68.4 (95%CI 67.0-69.9) vs. 65.2 (95%CI 63.2-67.2) hours, respectively; log-rank 0.014). COVID-19 patients showed significantly higher activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) throughout the CRRT due to intensified systemic anticoagulation compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (54 (IQR 45-61) vs. 47 (IQR 41-58) seconds, respectively; p < 0.001). A significantly higher incidence of metabolic alkalosis, hypercalcemia and hypernatremia, consistent with reduced filter patency and citrate overload, was observed in COVID-19 patients compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (19.1% vs. 12.7%, respectively; p = 0.04). These metabolic disarrangements were resistant to per-protocol adjustments and disappeared after replacement of the CRRT-filter. CONCLUSIONS: RCA-CRRT in COVID-19 patients with intensified systemic anticoagulation provides an adequate filter lifespan. However, close monitoring of the acid-base balance appears warranted, as these patients tend to develop reduced filter patency leading to a higher incidence of citrate overload and metabolic disturbances. TRIAL REGISTRATION (LOCAL AUTHORITY): EA1/285/20 (Ethikkommission der Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin); date of registration 08.10.2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Citrates , Citric Acid/adverse effects , Critical Illness , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Crit Care ; 24(1): 676, 2020 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-962957

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is emerging evidence for enhanced blood coagulation in coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) patients, with thromboembolic complications contributing to morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms underlying this prothrombotic state remain enigmatic. Further data to guide anticoagulation strategies are urgently required. METHODS: We used viscoelastic rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) in a single-center cohort of 40 critically ill COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: Clear signs of a hypercoagulable state due to severe hypofibrinolysis were found. Maximum lysis, especially following stimulation of the extrinsic coagulation system, was inversely associated with an enhanced risk of thromboembolic complications. Combining values for maximum lysis with D-dimer concentrations revealed high sensitivity and specificity of thromboembolic risk prediction. CONCLUSIONS: The study identifies a reduction in fibrinolysis as an important mechanism in COVID-19-associated coagulopathy. The combination of ROTEM and D-dimer concentrations may prove valuable in identifying patients requiring higher intensity anticoagulation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fibrinolysis/physiology , Thrombelastography/methods , Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation/physiology , Blood Coagulation Tests/methods , Blood Coagulation Tests/standards , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cohort Studies , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Point-of-Care Systems/standards , Point-of-Care Systems/statistics & numerical data , Thromboembolism/diagnostic imaging , Viscoelastic Substances/analysis , Viscoelastic Substances/therapeutic use
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