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1.
Br J Radiol ; 95(1129): 20210835, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575206

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of a barrier shield in reducing droplet transmission and its effect on image quality and radiation dose in an interventional suite. METHODS: A human cough droplet visualisation model in a supine position was developed to assess efficacy of barrier shield in reducing environmental contamination. Its effect on image quality (resolution and contrast) was evaluated via image quality test phantom. Changes in the radiation dose to patient post-shield utilisation was measured. RESULTS: Use of the shield prevented escape of visible fluorescent cough droplets from the containment area. No subjective change in line-pair resolution was observed. No significant difference in contrast-to-noise ratio was measured. Radiation dosage to patient was increased; this is predominantly attributed to the increased air gap and not the physical properties of the shield. CONCLUSION: Use of the barrier shield provided an effective added layer of personal protection in the interventional radiology theatre for aerosol generating procedures. ADVANCES IN KNOWLEDGE: This is the first time a human supine cough droplet visualisation has been developed. While multiple types of barrier shields have been described, this is the first systematic practical evaluation of a barrier shield designed for use in the interventional radiology theatre.


Subject(s)
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Protective Devices , Radiology, Interventional/instrumentation , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , Cough , Equipment Design , Fluorescence , Humans , Male , Phantoms, Imaging , Radiation Dosage , Signal-To-Noise Ratio , Supine Position
2.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 2021 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1471884

ABSTRACT

Aerosol generating procedures are avoided for COVID-19 patients to lower the risk of transmission to healthcare providers. However, when bronchoscopy is indicated, it remains unclear if the procedure performed under general anesthesia leads to contamination of the surroundings and if standard endoscopy reprocessing methods are effective in eradicating SARS-CoV-2. We share our experience of bronchoscopic retrieval of airway foreign body under general anesthesia in a patient tested positive for novel 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID 19). We focus on anesthesia techniques to minimise aerosolization.

4.
J Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 36(10): 2715-2719, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192144

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is a unique challenge that has disrupted endoscopy training. Initial infection control measures aimed at protecting patients and staff meant nonessential endoscopic activity was suspended in many countries. The decrease in elective caseload from the pandemic also reduced training numbers during this period. While hands-on training took a backseat, more efforts were directed to didactic training of cognitive competencies. We review the literature describing the impact of COVID-19 on endoscopy training and summarize key measures aimed at mitigating this effect. These include leveraging on web-based didactic material and video-conferences, increased use of simulation and models to hone technical competencies, and a shift in focus from numbers-based accreditation to competency-based accreditation. While COVID-19 was hoped to be short-lived, it is clear the impact is long-lasting. Hence, it is crucial for training programs to take stock of how endoscopy training is evolving and use this opportunity to implement new paradigms into their endoscopic training curricula. COVID-19 might just be the catalyst that transforms endoscopy training into a new digital era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Endoscopy/education , Gastroenterology/education , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Humans
5.
BMJ Open Gastroenterol ; 7(1)2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-934087

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Clinician burnout is an important occupational hazard that may be exacerbated by the novel COVID-19 pandemic. Within Southeast Asia, burnout in gastroenterology is understudied. The primary objective of this study is to estimate the prevalence of burnout symptoms within gastroenterology, in member states of the Associations of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. The secondary objective is to identify work-related stressors that contribute to burnout in ASEAN gastroenterologists. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is an observational study that will use anonymised online surveys to estimate the prevalence of burnout symptoms at two time points: during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 and in 2022 (assumed to be after the pandemic). Gastroenterologists from Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines and Brunei will be invited to participate in the online survey through their national gastroenterology and endoscopy societies. Burnout will be assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey tool. Supplementary questions will collect demographic and qualitative data. Associations between demographic characteristics and burnout will be tested by multiple regression. RESULTS: The prevalence of burnout symptoms in gastroenterology during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the baseline prevalence after COVID-19, will be established in the above-mentioned countries. Work-related stressors commonly associated with burnout will be identified, allowing the introduction of preventative measures to reduce burnout in the future. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was granted by the Singhealth Centralised Institutional Review Board (2020/2709). Results will be submitted for publication.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Gastroenterology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Asia/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
6.
World J Gastrointest Endosc ; 12(9): 256-265, 2020 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807806

ABSTRACT

The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has resulted in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) which has affected more than 4.5 million people in 213 countries, and has been declared a pandemic by World Health Organization on March 11, 2020. The transmission of SARS-CoV-2 has been reported to occur primarily through direct contact or droplets. There have also been reports that SARS-CoV-2 can be detected in biopsy and stool specimens, and it has been postulated that there is potential for fecal-oral transmission as well. Gastrointestinal symptoms have been reported in 17.6% of COVID-19 patients and transmission can potentially occur through gastrointestinal secretions in this group of patients. Furthermore, transmission can also occur in asymptomatic carriers or patients with viral shedding during the incubation period. Endoscopic procedures hence may pose significant risks of transmission (even for those not directly involving confirmed COVID-19 cases) as endoscopists and endoscopy staff are in close contact with patients during these aerosol generating procedures. This could result in inadvertent transmission of infection at time of endoscopy.

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