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1.
Mediators Inflamm ; 2022: 9821506, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1807716
2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-314409

ABSTRACT

2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is firstly found in Wuhan and has caused over 14,000 infections all over the world. We retrospectively investigated the presence of 2019-nCoV among influenza-like illness patients in Wuhan. Nine cases in January 2020 were 2019-nCoV positive, suggesting the virus has established community transmission in Wuhan, the origin and center of this epidemic.Authors Wen-Hua Kong, Yao Li, and Ming-Wei Peng contributed equally to this work.

3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325349

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 outbreak first reported in Wuhan has been officially declared as a global pandemic. Considering the fecal shedding of SARS-CoV-2 has been proven by the viral strains isolated from COVID-19 patient’s stool specimens, it proposed the possibility that contaminated wastewater and fomites might involve in the disease transmission in outbreak cities. In this study, we collected the wastewater samples collected from COVID-19 designated hospitals, Fangcang shelter hospitals, quarantine spots and wastewater treatment plants in Wuhan, China, and performed RT-qPCR and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for the detection of SARS-CoV-2. Although high concentration of residual chlorine for disinfection of SARS-CoV-2 is persisted, low level SARS-CoV-2 RNA can be detected by qPCR and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) in the wastewater samples during the COVID-19 outbreak. This preliminary data firstly described in China implies the potential transmission risk of SARS-CoV-2 through medical wastewater in the cities during the COVID-19 outbreak, which calls particular attention for the surveillance and efficient disinfection of wastewater from COVID-19 related facilities.

4.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 727419, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444039

ABSTRACT

Background: Blood parameters, such as neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, have been identified as reliable inflammatory markers with diagnostic and predictive value for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, novel hematological parameters derived from high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) have rarely been studied as indicators for the risk of poor outcomes in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Here, we aimed to assess the prognostic value of these novel biomarkers in COVID-19 patients and the diabetes subgroup. Methods: We conducted a multicenter retrospective cohort study involving all hospitalized patients with COVID-19 from January to March 2020 in five hospitals in Wuhan, China. Demographics, clinical and laboratory findings, and outcomes were recorded. Neutrophil to HDL-C ratio (NHR), monocyte to HDL-C ratio (MHR), lymphocyte to HDL-C ratio (LHR), and platelet to HDL-C ratio (PHR) were investigated and compared in both the overall population and the subgroup with diabetes. The associations between blood parameters at admission with primary composite end-point events (including mechanical ventilation, admission to the intensive care unit, or death) were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to compare the utility of different blood parameters. Results: Of 440 patients with COVID-19, 67 (15.2%) were critically ill. On admission, HDL-C concentration was decreased while NHR was high in patients with critical compared with non-critical COVID-19, and were independently associated with poor outcome as continuous variables in the overall population (HR: 0.213, 95% CI 0.090-0.507; HR: 1.066, 95% CI 1.030-1.103, respectively) after adjusting for confounding factors. Additionally, when HDL-C and NHR were examined as categorical variables, the HRs and 95% CIs for tertile 3 vs. tertile 1 were 0.280 (0.128-0.612) and 4.458 (1.817-10.938), respectively. Similar results were observed in the diabetes subgroup. ROC curves showed that the NHR had good performance in predicting worse outcomes. The cutoff point of the NHR was 5.50. However, the data in our present study could not confirm the possible predictive effect of LHR, MHR, and PHR on COVID-19 severity. Conclusion: Lower HDL-C concentrations and higher NHR at admission were observed in patients with critical COVID-19 than in those with noncritical COVID-19, and were significantly associated with a poor prognosis in COVID-19 patients as well as in the diabetes subgroup.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Cholesterol, HDL/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , China , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Female , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Leukocytes/cytology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Virol Sin ; 35(6): 752-757, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217477

ABSTRACT

The immense patient number caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic brings the urge for more knowledge about its immunological features, including the profile of basic immune parameters. In this study, eighty-eight reported COVID-19 patients in Wuhan were recruited from January to February, 2020, including 32 severe/critical cases and 56 mild/moderate cases. Their mean age was 56.43 years (range 17-83) and gender ratio (male/female) was 43:45. We tested SARS-CoV-2 RNA with commercial kits, investigated the level of serologic IgM and IgG antibodies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) using magnetic particle chemiluminescence immunoassays, and compared the results of serologic tests and nucleic acid test (NAT). Among 88 patients, 95.45% were confirmed as positive by the combination of NAT and antibody test, which was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than by single nucleic acid test (73.86%) or serologic test (65.91%). Then the correlation between temporal profile and the level of antibody response was analyzed. It showed that seroconversion started on day 5 after disease onset and IgG level was rose earlier than IgM. Comparison between patients with different disease severity suggested early seroconversion and high antibody titer were linked with less severe clinical symptoms. These results supported the combination of serologic testing and NAT in routine COVID-19 diagnosis and provided evidence on the temporal profile of antibody response in patients with different disease severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Luminescent Measurements/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Young Adult
7.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 11: 525, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690147

ABSTRACT

Background: Diabetes correlates with poor prognosis in patients with COVID-19, but very few studies have evaluated whether impaired fasting glucose (IFG) is also a risk factor for the poor outcomes of patients with COVID-19. Here we aimed to examine the associations between IFG and diabetes at admission with risks of complications and mortality among patients with COVID-19. Methods: In this multicenter retrospective cohort study, we enrolled 312 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 from 5 hospitals in Wuhan from Jan 1 to Mar 17, 2020. Clinical information, laboratory findings, complications, treatment regimens, and mortality status were collected. The associations between hyperglycemia and diabetes status at admission with primary composite end-point events (including mechanical ventilation, admission to intensive care unit, or death) were analyzed by Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results: The median age of the patients was 57 years (interquartile range 38-66), and 172 (55%) were women. At the time of hospital admission, 84 (27%) had diabetes (and 36 were new-diagnosed), 62 (20%) had IFG, and 166 (53%) had normal fasting glucose (NFG) levels. Compared to patients with NFG, patients with IFG and diabetes developed more primary composite end-point events (9 [5%], 11 [18%], 26 [31%]), including receiving mechanical ventilation (5 [3%], 6 [10%], 21 [25%]), and death (4 [2%], 9 [15%], 20 [24%]). Multivariable Cox regression analyses showed diabetes was associated increased risks of primary composite end-point events (hazard ratio 3.53; 95% confidence interval 1.48-8.40) and mortality (6.25; 1.91-20.45), and IFG was associated with an increased risk of mortality (4.11; 1.15-14.74), after adjusting for age, sex, hospitals and comorbidities. Conclusion: IFG and diabetes at admission were associated with higher risks of adverse outcomes among patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood Glucose/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Diabetes Complications/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/physiopathology , Glucose Intolerance/complications , Hyperglycemia/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Fasting , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Glucose Intolerance/virology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Hyperglycemia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate
9.
Nat Microbiol ; 5(5): 675-678, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-42049

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), was first reported in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China in late December 2019. We re-analysed 640 throat swabs collected from patients in Wuhan with influenza-like-illness from 6 October 2019 to 21 January 2020 and found that 9 of the 640 throat swabs were positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by quantitative PCR, suggesting community transmission of SARS-CoV2 in Wuhan in early January 2020.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , China , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
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