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1.
Nurs Open ; 2023 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238998

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study was to identify the influencing factors of sleep disorders and sleep quality in healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis of observational research. METHODS: The databases of the Cochrane Library, Web of Science, PubMed, Embase, SinoMed database, CNKI, Wanfang Data, and VIP were systematically searched. The quality of studies was assessed using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality evaluation criteria and the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. RESULTS: A total of 29 studies were included, of which 20 were cross-sectional studies, eight were cohort studies, and 1 was a case-control study; 17 influencing factors were finally identified. Greater risk of sleep disturbance was associated with female gender, single relationship status, chronic disease, insomnia history, less exercise, lack of social support, frontline work, days served in frontline work, department of service, night shift, years of work experience, anxiety, depression, stress, received psychological assistance, worried about being infected, and degree of fear with COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers did have worse sleep quality than the general population. The influencing factors of sleep disorders and sleep quality in healthcare workers are multifaceted. Identification and timely intervention of resolvable influencing factors are particularly important for preventing sleep disorders and improving sleep. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: This is a meta-analysis of previously published studies so there was no patient or public contribution.

2.
Nurs Open ; 10(5): 2746-2756, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2289971

ABSTRACT

AIM: This systematic review evaluated the quality of evidence for the prevention and management of facial pressure injuries in medical staff. DESIGN: This review was presented in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. METHODS: We retrieved the relevant studies from 19 databases. Using the literature evaluation standards and evidence grading system of the Australian Joanna Briggs Institute Evidence-Based Health Care Center, we evaluated the quality of the literature encompassing different types of research and assessed their levels of evidence. RESULTS: A total of 13 studies were included, including seven expert consensuses, two recommended practices, one clinical decision, one best practice information booklet, one systematic review and one randomized controlled trial. In the end, 31 best evidence were summarized, including skin cleaning and care, PPE placement and movement, reasonable use of dressings, treatment measures and education and training.


Subject(s)
Pressure Ulcer , Humans , Australia , Medical Staff , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
3.
J Clin Nurs ; 2023 Apr 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2306603

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study systematically compared the efficacy of various dressings that may prevent facial medical device-related pressure injury (MRDPI) in medical staff during the COVID-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, medical staff who are required to wear masks, goggles and other personal protective equipment (PPE) are susceptible to facial MRDPI, which exacerbates working conditions. Dressings can effectively prevent or alleviate MRDPI, but it is unclear which dressings are most effective. DESIGN: A systematic review and network meta-analysis, in accordance with PRISMA. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was conducted in four English and four Chinese databases to identify relevant studies published up to 8 September 2022. The selected studies were randomised controlled trials, with populations comprising medical staff who wore PPE during the COVID-19 pandemic and included an observation and control group. RESULTS: The network meta-analysis of the 12 selected articles showed that foam dressing, hydrocolloid dressing and petrolatum gauze were better than conventional protection for preventing MRDPI. The surface under the cumulative ranking curve indicated that foam dressing was the best preventative. CONCLUSION: Foam dressing is more effective than other dressings in preventing facial MRDPI in medical staff. When PPE must be worn for many hours, such as during the COVID-19 pandemic, medical staff can use foam dressings to prevent MRDPI. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The results support the use of dressings, especially foam dressings, to prevent MRDPI in healthcare workers. The appropriate dressings are recommended to prevent MRDPI associated with wearing PPE.

4.
Int J Nurs Pract ; 29(2): e13125, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2282750

ABSTRACT

AIM: To evaluate the incidence of facial pressure injuries in health-care professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic in a meta-analysis. METHODS: Related studies were obtained through electronic databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) Chinese Scientific Journal (VIP) China Biomedical Literature service systems (CBM) and Wanfang Data (from inception to 27 November 2021). The pooled incidence and the 95% confidence interval of facial pressure injuries were calculated with Review Manager v5.4 software. RESULTS: Overall, 16 studies with 14 430 health-care professionals were included. Pooled results showed that the pooled incidence of facial pressure injury in health-care professionals was 58.8% (95% CI: 49.0%-68.7%; p < 0.01). The results of the subgroup analysis showed that the incidence of facial pressure injury in these staff was high, and predominantly stage I pressure injury, in the following cases: in health-care professionals who wore personal protective equipment for longer than 4 h, in those without any training experience, and on the nose. CONCLUSION: Administrators and researchers should pay attention to preventing facial pressure injury related to the wearing of personal protective equipment (PPE) by ensuring all health-care professionals receive training and by limiting prolonged periods of use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Pressure Ulcer/prevention & control , Pandemics , Incidence , Health Personnel
5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(51): e32336, 2022 Dec 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2269429

ABSTRACT

The sudden outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has deep and wide negative mental impacts on the public, and studies on the impact of COVID-19 on social and mental well-being are necessary. This study aimed to evaluate mental distress, including anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and its related risk factors in Chinese adults in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. This study used a large-scale cross-sectional design. A total of 2067 adult participants completed the online survey via REDcap from 1st to 15th of March 2020 during the COVID-19 outbreak in China. Anxiety, depression, PTSD, and related risk factors, including self-efficacy, coping style, and social support, were measured using valid and reliable instruments. The data were analyzed using multiple linear regression. We found that 201 (9.7%) participants reported moderate-to-severe anxiety, 669 (33.8%) reported depression, and 368 (17.8%) reported symptoms of PTSD. Self-efficacy, coping style, and social support significantly affected anxiety, depression, and PTSD symptoms. Participants' sociodemographic characteristics, COVID-19 pandemic-related factors, low self-efficacy, low social support, and negative coping were predictors of mental distress during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our study will help healthcare professionals carry out early predictions and identification of high-risk groups and provide appropriate interventions to target groups during public health emergencies that plague the world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Pandemics , East Asian People , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology
6.
J Tissue Viability ; 32(2): 206-212, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2235949

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the influencing factors of medical device related pressure injury (MDRPU) in medical staff by meta-analysis. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was conducted by PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CNKI, VIP, CBM, and WanFang Data (from inception to July 27, 2022). Two researchers independently performed literature screening, quality evaluation and data extraction, and meta-analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.4 and Stata12.0 software. RESULTS: Total of 11215 medical staff were included in 9 articles. Meta analysis showed that gender, occupation, sweating, wearing time, single working time, department of COVID-19, preventive measures, and level 3 PPE were the risk factors for MDRPU in medical staff (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The outbreak of COVID-19 led to the occurrence of MDRPU among medical staff, and the influencing factors should be focused on. The medical administrator can further improve and standardize the preventive measures of MDRPU according to the influencing factors. Medical staff should accurately identify high-risk factors in the clinical work process, implement intervention measures, and reduce the incidence of MDRPU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Crush Injuries , Pressure Ulcer , Humans , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Pressure Ulcer/prevention & control , Pandemics , Health Personnel , Risk Factors , Crush Injuries/complications
7.
Medicine ; 101(51), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2168918

ABSTRACT

The sudden outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has deep and wide negative mental impacts on the public, and studies on the impact of COVID-19 on social and mental well-being are necessary. This study aimed to evaluate mental distress, including anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and its related risk factors in Chinese adults in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. This study used a large-scale cross-sectional design. A total of 2067 adult participants completed the online survey via REDcap from 1st to 15th of March 2020 during the COVID-19 outbreak in China. Anxiety, depression, PTSD, and related risk factors, including self-efficacy, coping style, and social support, were measured using valid and reliable instruments. The data were analyzed using multiple linear regression. We found that 201 (9.7%) participants reported moderate-to-severe anxiety, 669 (33.8%) reported depression, and 368 (17.8%) reported symptoms of PTSD. Self-efficacy, coping style, and social support significantly affected anxiety, depression, and PTSD symptoms. Participants' sociodemographic characteristics, COVID-19 pandemic-related factors, low self-efficacy, low social support, and negative coping were predictors of mental distress during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our study will help healthcare professionals carry out early predictions and identification of high-risk groups and provide appropriate interventions to target groups during public health emergencies that plague the world.

8.
J Adv Nurs ; 77(9): 3880-3893, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325009

ABSTRACT

AIM: Frontline nurses' willingness to work has significant implications for maintaining workforce stability and quality of care during the COVID-19 pandemic; however, few studies have investigated their willingness and the corresponding reasons. This study aims to examine frontline nurses' willingness to work, identify its predictors and explore its corresponding reasons. DESIGN: A mixed-methods design was conducted. METHODS: Based on a multilevel behavioural-diagnostic model, a questionnaire survey was used to collect quantitative and qualitative data concurrently from 13 February to 24 February 2020 to explore frontline nurses' willingness to work and the corresponding reasons in two hospitals in Wuhan, China. One was a designated hospital which only received COVID-19 patients, and the other was built up temporarily for COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: Of the 2014 participants, most (n = 1950, 96.8%) indicated their willingness to work, and a few (n = 64, 3.2%) expressed their unwillingness. Binary logistic regression analysis identified five predictors of participants' willingness to work, including monthly family income, average working hours per shift, belief in their colleagues' preparedness, belief in their hospitals' preparedness and levels of depression. These indicators explained 27% of the variance (p < .05). Frontline nurses' willingness to work mainly arose from professional commitment, patriotism and faith, while unwillingness to do so primarily stemmed from safety concerns and family responsibility. CONCLUSION: Most frontline nurses were willing to work and showed great professional commitment. IMPACT: Professional commitment and patriotism were two important individual-level factors affecting frontline nurses' willingness to work during a pandemic. Strategies should be implemented, such as appreciating and acknowledging their contribution, rewarding their valuable work, arranging reasonable working hours, enhancing colleagues' and hospitals' preparedness, and providing emotional support. Moreover, adequate personal protective equipment, self-protection training and social support should be ensured to address frontline nurses' safety concerns and family responsibility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
BMJ Open ; 11(5): e048822, 2021 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234305

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to establish a set of disability weights (DWs) for COVID-19 symptoms, evaluate the disease burden of inpatients and analyse the characteristics and influencing factors of the disease. DESIGN: This was a multicentre retrospective cross-sectional descriptive study. SETTING: The medical records generated in three temporary military hospitals in Wuhan. PARTICIPANTS: Medical records of 2702 inpatients generated from 5 February to 5 April 2020 were randomly selected for this study. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: DWs of COVID-19 symptoms were determined by the person trade-off approach. The inpatients' medical records were analysed and used to calculate the disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). The mean DALY was evaluated across sex and age groups. The relationship between DALY and age, sex, body mass index, length of hospital stay, symptom duration before admission and native place was determined by multiple linear regression. RESULTS: For the DALY of each inpatient, severe expiratory dyspnoea, mild cough and sore throat had the highest (0.399) and lowest (0.004) weights, respectively. The average synthetic DALY and daily DALY were 2.29±1.33 and 0.18±0.15 days, respectively. Fever and fatigue contributed the most DALY at 31.36%, whereas nausea and vomiting and anxiety and depression contributed the least at 7.05%. There were significant differences between sex and age groups in both synthetic and daily DALY. Age, body mass index, length of hospital stay and symptom duration before admission were strongly related to both synthetic and daily DALY. CONCLUSIONS: Although the disease burden was higher among women than men, their daily disease burdens were similar. The disease burden in the younger population was higher than that in the older population. Treatment at the hospitals relieved the disease burden efficiently, while a delay in hospitalisation worsened it.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cost of Illness , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals, Military , Humans , Inpatients , Male , Quality-Adjusted Life Years , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
10.
researchsquare; 2020.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-RESEARCHSQUARE | ID: ppzbmed-10.21203.rs.3.rs-80924.v1

ABSTRACT

Background: Since the advent of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, in most parts of the world, people are still at risk of the disease. We aimed to establish a set of disability weights (DWs) for COVID-19 symptoms, evaluate the disease burden of inpatients, analyze the characteristics, and influencing factors of the disease. Methods: The symptoms were identified by literature review and medical staff questionnaire. DWs of COVID-19 symptoms were determined by the person-trade-off approach proposed by the World Health Organization. The extracted medical records data of 2,702 randomly selected inpatients with COVID-19 at three temporary military hospitals in Wuhan, China, were analyzed and used to calculate the disability adjusted life years (DALY). Means DALY between gender and age groups were tested by analysis of variance. Multiple line regression models were used to determine the relationship between DALY and age, gender, body mass index, length of stay, symptom duration before admission, and native place. Results: For the DALY of each inpatient, severe expiratory dyspnea and mild cough and sore throat had the highest (0.399) and lowest (0.004) weights, respectively. The average synthetic DALY and daily DALY were 2.29±1.33 and 0.18±0.15 days, respectively. Fever and fatigue contributed the largest DALY at 31.36%; nausea and vomiting, and anxiety and depression contributed the least at 7.05%. There were significant differences between gender and age groups in both synthetic and daily DALY. Age, body mass index, length of stay, and symptom duration before admission were strongly related to both synthetic and daily DALY. Conclusions: COVID-19 and its symptoms could cause heavy disease burden. Although the disease burden was higher among females than in the males; however, their daily disease burdens were similar. Life value differs for different age groups; taking the changing life value with age into account; the disease burden in the younger population was higher than that in the older population. Besides, treatment at the hospitals relieved the disease burden efficiently, while delay in hospitalization could worsen it. Therefore, deployment of adequate medical resources for early hospitalization of patients with moderate or severe symptoms is needed by the public health authority.

11.
EClinicalMedicine ; 24: 100424, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-624750

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, frontline nurses face enormous mental health challenges. Epidemiological data on the mental health statuses of frontline nurses are still limited. The aim of this study was to examine mental health (burnout, anxiety, depression, and fear) and their associated factors among frontline nurses who were caring for COVID-19 patients in Wuhan, China. METHODS: A large-scale cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational study design was used. A total of 2,014 eligible frontline nurses from two hospitals in Wuhan, China, participated in the study. Besides sociodemographic and background data, a set of valid and reliable instruments were used to measure outcomes of burnout, anxiety, depression, fear, skin lesion, self-efficacy, resilience, and social support via the online survey in February 2020. FINDINGS: On average, the participants had a moderate level of burnout and a high level of fear. About half of the nurses reported moderate and high work burnout, as shown in emotional exhaustion (n = 1,218, 60.5%), depersonalization (n = 853, 42.3%), and personal accomplishment (n = 1,219, 60.6%). The findings showed that 288 (14.3%), 217 (10.7%), and 1,837 (91.2%) nurses reported moderate and high levels of anxiety, depression, and fear, respectively. The majority of the nurses (n = 1,910, 94.8%) had one or more skin lesions, and 1,950 (96.8%) nurses expressed their frontline work willingness. Mental health outcomes were statistically positively correlated with skin lesion and negatively correlated with self-efficacy, resilience, social support, and frontline work willingness. INTERPRETATION: The frontline nurses experienced a variety of mental health challenges, especially burnout and fear, which warrant attention and support from policymakers. Future interventions at the national and organisational levels are needed to improve mental health during this pandemic by preventing and managing skin lesions, building self-efficacy and resilience, providing sufficient social support, and ensuring frontline work willingness.

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